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Full text of "Missionary Visitor, The (1920)"

THE MISSIONARY 




Church of the ^Brethren 



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Dahanu Boarding School Girls at the Well Drawing Their Day's Supply of Water 



VOL. XXII 



JANUARY, 1920 






NO. 1 

■mmi 






The Missionary Visitor 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN 
THROUGH HER GENERAL MISSION BOARD 



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Different members of the same family may each give a dollar or more, and extra sub- 
scriptions, thus secured, may upon request be sent to persons who they know will be in- 
terested in reading the Visitor. 

Kindly notice, however, that these subscription terms do not include a subscription for 
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Min sters. In consideration of their services to the church, influence in assisting the 
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be sent to ministers of the Church of the Brethren. 

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October 3, 1917, authorized Aug. 20, 1918. 



Contents for January, 1920 

EDITORIALS, , 1 

ESSAYS— 

The Depressed Classes in Our Field, By J. B. Emmert, ."'. 3 

Why and How Educate the Depressed Classes, By J. M. Blough, 5 

Industrial Schools for the Depressed Classes, By S. Ira Arnold, 7 

Trained Workers the Hope of the Mass Movement, By I. S. Long 10 

Mass Movement Among the Methodists, By A. T. Hoffert, , . 12 

The C. M. S. Mass Movement, By H. L. Alley, 14 

Mass Movement of Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society, South In- 
dia, By Ella Ebbert, 17 

How to Prepare the Soil for a Mass Movement, By H. P. Garner, .... 18 

Learning from Others About Mass Movements, By Wilbur Stover, .... 21 
Opportunities for Work Among Girls of the Depressed Classes, By 

Olive Widdowson, 21 

India Notes for October, By Ida C. Shumaker, 23 

China Notes for October, By V. Grace Clapper, 24 

THE JUNIOR MISSIONARY— 

Lukshmi's Story to the Visitor Children, By B. M. R., 26 

FINANCIAL REPORT, 28 



Volume XXII 



JANUARY, 1920 



No. 1 



EDITORIALS 



Written by Sister Eliza B. Miller, Editor of This Issue of the Missionary Visitor 



" Scattered over the length and breadth 
of India there are 60,000,000 people who 
have been for centuries untold downtrod- 
den and outcaste and oppressed, treated 
rather as animals than men by the rest of 
the population. But a new day is dawning: 
the cry of these countless multitudes is 
making itself heard. They are beginning 
to demand the right to an ordinary human 
existence, which has been denied to them 
all through the ages. We talk about the 
awakening of the great Chinese nation from 
her sleep of centuries; we might also talk 
of the awakening of the downtrodden class- 
es of India." 



" The question is, how are we to tackle 
the problem?— 60,000,000 people, accessible, 
as never before, to the Gospel. They are 
in many cases asking for social improve- 
ment, for education, for something they do 
not understand but vaguely feel they need. 
Many, many are truly feeling after God, if 
haply they may find him, and so great is 
their desire for the satisfaction of their 
souls' need, that they are willing to bear 
months of bitter persecution, from their 
still heathen neighbors, as the price of their 
struggle into the freedom with which Christ 
alone can make them free. How is their 
need to be satisfied? How are we to reach 
so many? How are we to give them the 
Gospel to which they have just as much 
right as you and I? That is the problem 
that faces us today." 



" There are three open doors before these 
waiting masses. Three different classes of 
people are offering them their religion: 1. 
The Mohammedans are inviting them, but 
all they have to offer them is the loveless 
religion of a dead prophet — an escape from 



one bondage to be enslaved by a new one. 
2. The Arya Samaj (a reformed sect of Hin- 
duism) is struggling to get them, but what 
have they to give them? No forgiveness 
of sins; no peace with God; no life of vic- 
tory over temptation; no glorious future, 
and no real satisfaction for their souls' hun- 
ger. 3. We Christians ought to be giving 
them the chance to choose Christ, because 
he gave his life for them. The power of 
Christ can transform these people, and 
make of degraded and cringing and utterly 
sunken men and women, manly, courageous 
Christians. Will you help give them the 
chance? " 

The above quotations are taken from the 
C. M. S. Booklet on the Mass Movement. 
It so well fits to the situation we wish to 
present to you in this issue that we have 
quoted it just as given in the Booklet. We 
desire your interest and prayers as you read 
this issue of the Visitor. 



The missionary's prayer must often be in 
the words of J. R. Clark: 

" Lord, let not my burdens break me, 
But let them just awake me; 
Till I may soon betake me, 
To thy sweet love which can make me, 
Holy and serene." 



The India Sunday-school Union called all 
Sunday-schools in India to join in special 
prayer and thanksgiving for Sunday- 
schools, Oct. 19-20. It suggested that spe- 
cial preparation be made during the week 
for the occasion, and that Sunday, the 19th, 
be a Decision Day for the young people. 



The National Missionary Society of In- 
dia had Sunday, Oct. 5, set apart as a day 
especially devoted to its interests. It is a 



5 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1920 



103 



most worthy organization. It is interde- 
nominational. Its workers and mission- 
aries are self-sacrificing men and women. 
Its "object" is worthy of attention: "With 
India men, India money and India manage- 
ment, but in cooperation with all missionary 
societies, founding no new denomination, 
but preserving the strongest loyalty to the 
churches; soliciting no funds outside of In- 
dia, but laying the burden of India's evan- 
gelization upon her own sons and daugh- 
ters, the society has been evangelizing some 
of the neglected districts of India for the 
last thirteen and a half years." 

Sister Ziegler, with a company of men 
and women, is spending several days at a 
big Hindu religious fair near Jhagadia. This 
is a yearly gathering of pilgrims and devout 
Hindus from all over India. Gospels and 
tracts are sold and distributed, and the 
message of the Gospel is given verbally 
wherever and whenever opportunity comes. 

Sister Mow is our representative at the 
National W. C. T. U. Convention held at 
Lucknow from Nov. 6-12. The president 
of the W. C. T. U. is one of the wide-awake 
American missionaries of the Reformed 
Presbyterian Mission of the Punjab. Tem- 
perance finds a warm place in the hearts of 
pious Christians, Mohammedans and Hin- 
dus all over the land. 



Brethren Stover and Pittenger were our 
representatives at the Western India Coun- 
cil of Missions, held in Bombay early in 
September. Bro. Stover was elected chair- 
man of the Council for 1920. 



Brethren Long and Stover were our del- 
egates to the Gujarat Book and Tract So- 
ciety, held at Anand the last week in Qc- 
tober. New resolutions and by-laws for the 
society were framed and accepted. These 
provide for membership from all mission- 
ary societies as well as India Christians. 

The Hindu Missionary Society of Nag- 
pur, Central Province, now two years old, 
recently initiated about thirty young men 
of the depressed classes and invested them 
with the sacred thread. 



At a recent series of meetings the follow- 
ing story was related in one of the address- 
es: In a village in South India the educated 
high-caste women became interested in 
Christ, and, fearing that their husbands 
might not consent to their being baptized, 
fifty of them decided to be baptized and 
tell their husbands afterwards. On hearing 
of this, the men met to decide what they 
should do. After consultation they stated 
that they found their wives just the same 
as they were before, except more loving, 
and kind, and gentle, and they decided to 
say nothing about it. One of the wives 
could not rest until her husband joined her 
in her new-found joy, and by prayer and 
persuasion led him to Christ. Then the Hin- 
du leaders became greatly stirred. They 
gathered the Bibles of the women and 
burned them, beating the women and forc- 
ing them to sign a letter to the bishop, stat- 
ing that they were no longer Christians, 
and asking him tp take their names from 
the church roll. But a little later the wom- 
en managed to get a letter to the bishop, 
telling him that the former letter had been 
signed under compulsion and for him to 
pay no attention to it. They still loved and 
followed the Savior. One of their perse- 
cutors died while burning the Bibles, and 
another died in great agony, crying out that 
he saw Jesus Christ. 

The late Rev. John P. Jones, more than 
thirty years missionary in this country, 
once gave the following on the wonderful 
opportunities offered to the Christian forces 
at work: "I know of no land that needs 
the Gospel more than does India, and this 
sense of her need is increasing constantly. 
It is true they are a proud people of an 
ancient civilization, and yet their entire cult 
is a decadent one, wholly powerless to sat- 
isfy the people. The appeal of India is a 
colossal one. The conversion of the people 
to Christian thought and life is a challenge 
to the Christian forces of the church at 
home. One-fifth of the population of the 
world is confined within the limits of the 
peninsula. It has as many races as all 
Europe, and they speak 147 languages. In- 
dia has always held the leadership of Asia 
in all the deep things of the soul. To win 



January 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



India for Christ is to strike at the heart of 
Asia, and to bring the million heathen 
shrines to naught." 



Speaking of India's villages, Rev. R. H. 
Clancy says: " If Christ had started on the 
day of his baptism to preach in the villages 
of India, and had continued up to the pres- 
ent, visiting one village each day, healing 
the sick and proclaiming the Gospel, he 
would still have left unvisited 30,000 villages 
in India. The villages of India contain 
nine-tenths of the population of the land, or 
more than 280,000,000 people. It is among 
these villages that the great Mass Move- 
ment is taking place." 

///.'/ r 

It is of these villages that the National 
Missionary Intelligence speaks as follows: 
" Life in the village is not by any means 
an easy one for Indian missionaries. Being 



away from the society of educated people, 
with none of the advantages of a reading 
room, or a library, a telegraph or postoffice, 
with no schools to educate their children 
and with no easy or cheap means of com- 
munication with the nearest towns or rail- 
way stations, it is obvious that they have 
to undergo many hardships. To live in 
these villages and to carry on the Lord's 
work among our illiterate and ignorant 
countrymen is certainly to carry the cross 
every day. But when we remember that 
90 per cent of the population of India live 
in villages, can we think of a more effective 
way of winning our countrymen for Christ 
than that of the Indian church sending 
forth such cross-bearers by scores and hun- 
dreds into our villages? The village work- 
ers certainly need the prayers of the church. 
They need courage to stand loyally for 
Jesus Christ in the midst of a crooked and 
perverse generation." 



The Depressed Classes of Our Field 



IN this article the term 
classes " refers chiefly to the descend- 
ants of the peoples whom the Aryans 
found in India when they came down from 
their ancient home in central Asia more 
than three thousand years ago. The prob- 
ability is that then there were not more 
than four or five distinct divisions of these 
aboriginal tribes. As the caste system de- 
veloped among the Aryans and they were 
divided and subdivided, and redivided over 
and over again, the subject races also were 
influenced by this movement and were 
formed into castes. These gradually be- 
came separated one from the other in so- 
cial customs, caste rules and religious prac- 
tices. 



Within the borders of our mission field 
we have three distinct divisions of these 
aborigines, with subdivisions in each of 
them. To the looker-on from without, the 
differences are small, but to them they are 
sufficiently important to cause very sharp 
divisions on social questions. 

In general we may say that in their re- 
ligious beliefs and observances they are 



J. B. Emmert 

1 depressed much alike. They have no religious book, 
nor do they have recognized leaders or 
priests to guide or teach them. They fol- 
low tradition, and " custom " is to them an 
iron law. They believe in a vague way in 
one supreme God, but their belief in lesser 
gods and goddesses is much more real. 
They worship these lesser spirits, who, as 
they suppose, dwell in stones and idols 
which are set up and dedicated to their 
use, and also in certain kinds of trees. One 
of the most popular of their " divinities " is 
called " Mother." She has shrines at most 
of their villages and is greatly feared by 
the people. She gets credit for all their 
good fortunes and blame for all the mis- 
haps they may have. Sickness is supposed 
to be sent by some offended spirit. Men 
known among them as " bhagats " profess 
to be " mediums " through whom the of- 
fended spirits make known their demands. 
They may demand the offering of a chicken 
or goat or other animal to be sacrificed at 
a shrine of the offended spirit; or they 
may demand some deed of merit, as the 
erection of a shrine or setting up of an 



* COLLEGE LIBRARY 



The Missionary Visitor 



idol. The sick person usually takes a vow 
to perform what the god or goddess de- 
mands. If he dies the vow is forgotten by 
his friends. If he recovers he may or may 
not carry out the vow, accord- 
ing to his religious tendencies. 
However, if he fails to per- 
form it, any later sickness or 
mishap is at once attributed 
to his failure to keep his vow. 
There is strong belief in the 
return of the spirits of the 
dead to torment their living 
relatives and friends unless 
due honor is paid to their bod- 
ies at the time of death and 
to their memory from year to 
year. Due to this fear, little 
wooden images of departed 
ones are set up in a fence cor- 
ner near the old home. At 
least once a year these images 
are visited, are reclothed and 
given bits of food and oil with 
due ceremony, thus to keep 
the departed ones happy and 
contented. Fear, fear, FEAR 
is the motive that spurs them 
on in the observance of their 
religious ceremonies. 

For centuries these people, 
like the higher-caste Hindus 
about them, have been con- 
tent to remain as their fathers 
had been before them. Edu- 
cation, culture, improvement, 
advancement had no lure or 
charm for them. The fact 
that there were other men 
and women farther down in 
the scale of caste than they 
were seemed to blind them to 
their own distressed condition, and was 
ground for an amazing amount of caste 
pride and self-esteem. 

The aborigines in our field may be rough- 
ly divided into three general divisions: the 
Bhils of Anklesvar, Raj Pipla and Ahwa; 
the Gamit-Dhordia group of Vyara, Jalal- 
por and Bulsar; the Mithna-Varley group 
of Dahanu and Vada. Their total number 
is about 700,000, 140,000 of whom are chil- 
dren of school-going age. Most of these 




This man walked 14 miles 
with his sick baby and son 
to reach the Bulsar Dispen- 
sary. The mother had died. 
They were all nearly dead 
with starvation. The baby 
he carries in a clotli ar- 
ranged like a bag and slung 
from his shoulder. The ba- 
by died on the second day 
after coming here. The 
man left later with the boy 
much improved in health. 



January 

1920 

children, too, are not in school and most 
likely will never see inside a school unless 
it be some way through your help. 

A great work has been done among the 
Bhils at Anklesvar and Raj 
Pipla, hundreds of them hav- 
ing already united with the 
church and many other hun- 
dreds being decidedly favor- 
able to Christianity. They are 
sending their children to 
school and most commendable 
progress has been made by 
many of them. Some of the 
finest characters thus far de- 
veloped in our church in India 
come from this class of peo- 
ple. The missionaries at Ahwa 
also have been made to re- 
joice because of a very decid- 
ed turn of the people towards 
the work of the mission. 
About thirty were added to 
the church this year, which 
makes an increase of 42 per 
cent in the membership there, 
and "many more are clamor- 
ing for early baptism." So a 
recent report informs us. 

The Gamits and kindred 
tribes in the Vyara territory 
also have responded in great 
numbers. Hundreds have unit- 
ed with the church and many 
others are turning or are 
ready to turn in greater num- 
bers than the missionary and 
his Indian staff are able to in- 
struct. These people are send- 
ing their children to school in 
larger numbers than the pres- 
ent equipment of the schools 

can accommodate. The outlook in this part 

of the field is exceedingly bright. 

The Dhordia-Nayka-Dubla tribes of Bul- 
sar and Jalalpor have been slower to re- 
spond to the gospel call, but they, too, have 
been largely influenced during the past 
three or four years. Their attitude has 
changed and they are calling for schools 
and Christian teachers. This demand has 
been larger than the supply and constitutes 
a real problem to the missionaries in charge 



January 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



of the work. Here, too, boys and girls are 
asking admittance to the boarding schools, 
and the resources of the mission ar*e taxed 
to the utmost. Sufficiently large numbers 
have come from all three of these castes 
to indicate that we need to prepare for a 
movement among them similar to that at 
Anklesvar and Vyara. 

The Mitnas and Varleys of Dahanu and 
Vada have not yet responded in an encour- 
aging way. They are much oppressed by 
the land owners and money lenders, so that 
they have little freedom of thought or ac- 
tion. However, the missionaries and In- 
dian workers who are laboring among them 
have reason to be encouraged and are con- 
fident that ere long these people will be 
convinced of the power and love and grace 
of our adorable Lord and turn to him in 
large numbers. The faith of the Christian 
forces in these parts is so strong that they 
are preparing for the movement just as 
definitely as are those who have already 



seen the beginnings of the Mass Move- 
ment. 

What does this all mean to the church 
in America? Are we in earnest in this 
work? Have we been praying that God 
would turn the hearts of the heathen to 
himself? Are we desirous of great success 
in our mission work? We can say "Yes" 
heartily to all these questions and mean it, 
too. Then the awakenings, and stirrings 
and movements of the 700,000 reachable 
people in our India mission field constitute 
a mighty call to every member of the 
church to do all in his power adequately to 
equip the mission with missionaries, Indian 
workers, schoolhouses and churches, and 
to furnish money to carry the work to a 
successful issue. It also constitutes a 
mighty call to every child of God to pray 
that God will continue to turn men unto 
himself and bring to himself great honor 
and glory on our India mission field. 

Huntingdon, Pa. 



Why and How Educate the Depressed Classes 



J. M. 

WHY educate anybody? All the ar- 
guments that can be put forth in 
favor of education here in Ameri- 
ca can be urged in behalf of the depressed 
classes in India; and they can be urged 
with greater insistence because of the con- 
ditions in which these classes are com- 
pelled to live. Most of them are serfs, liv- 
ing in agrestic slavery, in debt to their mas- 
ters from birth till death, without any hope 
of deliverance. But education will give 
them not only hope and knowledge of a 
better life, but also the power to realize 
that life of freedom. Education will bring 
them release from this state of dependence, 
poverty and degradation. They will learn 
to know and respect themselves, and take 
their place in the ranks of an honorable 
community. Ignorance breeds superstition, 
idolatry, demon-worship, and all abomina- 
ble heathen beliefs and practices. Educa- 
tion is the light to dispel this darkness and 
to set its prisoners free. 

But it is not simply education for which 
we plead, but Christian education. Why 



Blough 

should missions undertake to educate the 
depressed classes? First of all, because 
present agencies are insufficient. They can- 
not educate themselves; the higher classes 
in India generally take no interest in their 
education, really preferring to keep them in 
ignorance; and the government schools and 
methods are inadequate to meet the needs 
of these people. Hence, missions should 
endeavor to give them education. 

But it is because they need Christian ed- 
ucation that missions should be eager to 
come to their rescue. To educate these 
people without giving them Christ would 
be to make them atheists like Japanese, or 
to bring them under the influence of some 
large non-Christian religion where they will 
be harder to reach for Christ than they are 
now. These people are away down and 
must be reached by somebody that is above 
them and is willing to go down and lift 
them. That is the Christian church. Most 
of our Christians are coming from these 
classes; hence there is an intensified rea- 
son for educating them — at least those that 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1920 



are Christian or in touch with Christianity. 
The Indian church must be intelligent, and 
we must make it so. We want the church 
to become self-supporting, self-propagat- 
ing and self-governing, but unless we ed- 
ucate we can cherish no hope along this 
line. They have no teaching in the home — 
nowhere in fact; all must be given by the 
Christian mission. And why stop with 
those who are at present under the influ- 
ence of the church? Why not reach out in 
our educational policy until we have 
reached the 700,000? It is practically cer- 
tain that if we educate the children of these 
classes they will become Christian, and 
through them their relatives and friends, as 
we have proved by experience. We need 
to educate them to bring them into the 
Christian church, and then educate them to 
make them a useful and influential church. 
Christianity implies education. Without 
education these depressed classes cannot be 
expected to develop into a high type of 
Christians. 

Now how shall we educate them? It is 
impossible to plan to educate the aged, or 
even the middle-aged. They do learn some 
truths, thank God, enough to believe and 
be saved. But education is for children and 
youths, and our plans must be for them, 
both male and female. At present this ed- 
ucation is carried on by means of two 
kinds of schools, and we shall confine this 
discussion to these two. 

First is the village school. The people 
live in villages, so the village school is very 
convenient for all, and becomes a very nec- 
essary part of village life. The Christian 
village school becomes most influential 
among the villagers, for the Christian 
teacher not only teaches the children in 
school, but he also teaches the parents in 
the evening as they assemble in the school- 
house for night school and a prayer serv- 
ice; and the teacher with his family as he 
lives a daily example among the villagers, 
shows them how to live, and so is instru- 
mental in building up a Christian commu- 
nity. Well, this plan looks ideal, but lis- 
ten! Consider the number of trained Chris- 
tian teachers this plan requires, and as yet 
we do not have them. Then, too, putting a 
teacher into a village does not mean that 



there is a school, or that all the children of 
school age will be in school. Many claim 
to be too poor to send their children to 
school and many are too indifferent. Nev- 
ertheless, the village school is a necessity 
and must be provided. 

Second is the boarding school. This is 
the central school, generally at the mission 
station, where children are brought and fed 
and clothed and educated largely at mission 
expense. A few of the reasons for these 
schools are: (1) It is a chance to educate 
children whose parents are too poor to send 
them to a village school. (2) Village 
schools are of necessity very primary, but 
in the boarding schools children, are taken 
through the grades. (3) In the boarding 
school the children are removed from their 
heathen surroundings and so learn Chris- 
tian ways better and become Christians 
much sooner, and can be trained to become 
teachers also. The ideal is to select only 
the most promising out of the village 
schools and bring these into the boarding 
schools in the hope of training them to be- 
come workers among their own people. Aft- 
er the boarding school they are sent to the 
training school to finish their education. 
Some have already become workers. Pray 
the Lord for many more. 



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Children of the Bible School Students 




Ahwa Boarding School Boys 



January 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



Industrial Schools for the Depressed Classes 



S. Ira Arnold 



SIXTY millions! Not so long ago the 
population of the United States was 
not more than sixty millions, and to- 
day if that number were taken from us we 
would wonder where all the people had 
gone. Yes, sixty millions are a large num- 
ber of people, but that many are held in 
slavery in India today; slavery, not legal, 
but literal slavery. During the 60s, while 
the manhood of America's then sixty mil- 
lion population were fighting to liberate 
one million negroes from legal slavery, the 
fathers of an equal sixty million in India 
were striving under depressed conditions, 
making, continuing and increasing debts 
that would be passed on to their children 
and children's children, holding them in 
slavery no less literal and scarcely less se- 
vere than that from which the negroes were 
liberated. 

The man who was born with the debt of 
his father resting upon him, and who, after 
striving a lifetime, finds that the debt has 
only increased as a legacy for his son, has 
indeed lived the life of a slave. He has 
lived, has worked for his creditor master, 
has received only the bare necessities of 
life until the debt should be paid, has bor- 
rowed more money that he might have a 
wedding for his son, has spent his life in 
deepest ignorance and poverty, and has 
passed away, never knowing the meaning 
of liberty. Or the man who was so for- 
tunate as to inherit from his father a small 
field finds it even more difficult in his ig- 
norance and with his crude methods to 
maintain his standing. An English officer, 
while discussing these people and their 
condition, remarked that after all such a 
social condition was perhaps best for these** 
people, as they were very little above the 
brute. But, regardless of depression, ig- 
norance and superstition, and all that goes 
with heathen poverty, the missionary sees 
in each one a something that is far above 
the brute; a social and intellectual power, 
although latent, yet nevertheless potential 
and capable of being developed, and most 
of all a living soul to be saved. 

The true representative of Jesus Christ 



believes the Gospel to be the saving mes- 
sage for every soul in India, the wealthy 
and learned, the poor and ignorant. The 
missionary will usually not withhold the 
message from the first comer; and who 
shall these first comers be but these de- 
pressed people, already feeling their need 
and insufficiency? While the better-to-do 
are also desired to become members of the 
fold, the depressed classes can in no way 
be despised, for God is no Respecter of 
persons. 

The missionary, leaving his home of nec- 
essary comforts, may go out among these 
less-favored people. He may travel for 
miles and pass hundreds of huts, such as a 
modern American farmer would not even 
use to shelter his swine, yet each of these 
huts houses one or more families, together 
with their goats, cattle and such animals 
as they may possess. Shall he call these 
people brethren? It is difficult, yet for 
them Christ died; for them the mission- 
ary's heart goes out in deepest sympathy; 
for them he must give his efforts, his all, 
his very life if need be. He may teach them 
and preach to them; he may tell them the 
story of Jesus and they may respond; he 
may baptize them and they may become 
Christian, but to bring to them the light of 
the world, to lift them in their plane of liv- 
ing, to increase their wants and leave them 
unable to supply those wants can be little 
less than criminal. To increase their needs 
witnout increasing their ability to produce 
is to render their condition worse. They 
may revile against the one who awakened 
them from their slumbering ignorance. 

The missionary soon finds that if he 
alone is to teach the multitudes his task is 
hopeless. The masses do not understand 
him properly; neither does he understand 
their meaning in life. If his work is to 
prosper he must have helpers. Thus the 
first of his converts, and especially the chil- 
dren among the first converts, may be giv- 
en the opportunity o*f a first-class education 
and become the workers and teachers on 
whom the duties of evangelizing the mass- 
es fall. Their increased needs are supplied 



8 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 

1920 



by the wages paid by the mission, which 
may be double or even quadruple what they 
could earn in their original condition. Many 
of the children aspire to be masters. But 
not every person is gifted to be a teacher; 
neither could the mission employ all if they 
were fitted. The boy who has passed the 
vernacular final, upon going back to his 
village finds his wants have doubled, but 
his productive ability may not have in- 
creased over that of his father. The six to 
eight years of schooling at mission expense 
will not render him more satisfied to re- 
turn to hard, unskilled labor at six to ten 
cents per day. To a limited number the 
mission might dole out free rations, but 
this would be unwise, except at times of 
misfortune or disaster; neither could it be 
done to the masses. To Christianize a de- 
pressed people means to raise their stand- 
ard of living and to increase their just 
wants. To leave them unable to supply 
those wants is to bring dissatisfaction and 
invite ruin later. 

There seems to be but one way to meet 
the increased wants by increased produc- 
tive ability, and that is to teach the people 
to work. The average man of these sixty 
millions receives about eight cents per day 
for his labor. If his efforts were on the 
American market they might be worth 
twenty-five cents, but certainly not much 
more. Two men are required to dig a post 
hole. I had procured from Montgomery 
Ward & Co. a shovel, a spade, and a post- 
hole digger, but I must use them myself or 
they remain unused. One man will sit flat 
on the ground and dig with a sharp iron 
digger until there is a quantity of loose 
dirt. Then with *his hands he fills the dirt 
into a basket and gives it to the assistant, 
who dumps it on a pile beside the hole. 
If the space is less crowded he may stand 
and dig with a one-pointed pick; then fill 
the basket, using a hoe, and hand it to the 
assistant. While either man could dig the 
hole and dump the dirt without moving 
from his tracks, and each must wait while 
the other works, this second man seems to 
be necessary, although his chief duty is to 
let the dirt fall from the basket. The short 
hand-saws of the carpenters are operated 
by two men. A rude handle is fastened to 
the little end of the saw and the men al- 



ternately push and pull until the stick is 
cut in two. In weeding the fields, however, 
each must do his own work, for I have 
never seen two men weeders. The weeding 
instrument is like an old-fashioned grass 
hook, with curved blade about six inches 
long, sharpened on both edges at the point; 
thus, going or coming, it will cut. The 
weeders usually work in groups of three 
to twenty persons. Each one sitting on 
the ground proceeds to dig out, one at a 
time, the stalks of grass within his reach. 
An hour later we may be able to note his 
progress, for he actually may have moved 
to a new spot three feet farther down the 
row. We also procured some American 
garden hoes for the boys, but they did not 
take to them much for cutting grass or 
weeds. What few did soon had the han- 
dles broken from several — for why should 
such long handles be put into hoes if they 
were not to be struck with all one's might? 

The missionaries are awake to the fact 
that industrial education is one of the main 
forces that may be used in the regeneration 
of India, and many have already started 
industrial schools. An ignorant, depressed, 
unskilled and indolent people may be at- 
tracted to Christianity because of material 
benefits, and indeed these benefits should 
not be found lacking; but to be substantial 
and lasting these benefits should be the 
fruits of the efforts of the converted; con- 
verted in spirit, mind and body, new-born 
in ways of worship, ways of thought and 
ways of work. 

The mission industrial schools of India 
are teaching the boys carpentry, black- 
smithing, machine work, engine running, 
printing and bookbinding, cane work, brass 
work, brick and concrete building, weaving, 
tailoring, drawing, farming and gardening 
and other trades. Of the students in school 
about 75 per cent are from the depressed- 
classes. In some schools they are slower 
in learning than their classmates from the 
higher castes, but prove equally efficient 
after training. The father in his native vil- 
lage may earn from four to twenty cents 
per day, an average of perhaps eight cents. 
His trained son will receive an average of 
about 35 cents a day for his work, solving 
nicely the problem of increased wants. 

About 75 per cent of the students finish 



January 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



some prescribed course, after which they 
may find employment on plantations and 
estates, running farm engines, working in 
factories, on the railway, public work, 
teaching in the schools, but perhaps best of 
all in starting independent shops, farms 
and enterprises for themselves. It is also 
gratifying to note that about 90 per cent of 
the mission-trained industrial men find em- 
ployment outside the mission. This is as 
it is desired. The best may be held for 
teachers, or expert managers, but the mass- 
es should go out to serve the industry of 
their country. When the converted masses 
can maintain themselves on an elevated 
plane of living, independent of mission 
help, the leaven of Christianity may well be 
in way for leavening the whole lump. The 
efforts of the mission may then be directed 
to material aid to an ever-increasing num- 
ber and more spiritual help to all. 

The flow of industrial graduates is to- 
wards the cities. Only a very small per- 
centage go back to their native or similar 
villages. For themselves they find better 
wages, more entertainments and excite- 
ment; also better schools for their children. 
But their ignorant relatives get little bene- 
fit from their learning and skill. Further- 
more, the father may complain that the 
mission stole his boy, sent him to school, 
then to the city and lost him to their home. 
He may become embittered against the ef- 
forts for good. With the student of agri- 
culture this may not be, for he will find a 
sphere of activity on the fields of his own 
or similar" village. He may go back and 
carry to his people the leavening influence 
of his material, mental and spiritual im- 
provement. He can raise better crops than 
his father. He can make, repair and han- 
dle tools better than his father; he knows 
more about raising stock than his father; 
he becomes the pride of his father and a 
definite, permanent asset to the Christian 
mission that gave him his training. 

The above is a limited view of India in 
general, of which our own mission is no ex- 
ception. In our area are hundreds of thou- 
sands of these depressed people. We have 
started many schools among them, and 
hundreds of the boys and girls are now in 
school. The government curriculum to 



which we have catered because of recogni- 
tion and a very small grant-in-aid, is chiefly 
a literary course training for teaching or 
for government positions, but the boy who 
aspires to neither of these finds little that 
is of real practical value to him. He may 
return to his village, knowing no more of 
improved methods and perhaps less of the 
crude methods of production than his ig- 
norant father. 

True, our mission has offered not only 
the government literary course. We have 
taught carpentry to a large number of boys, 
many of whom are now able to cope with 
the best workmen in their trade. To a less 
extent they have also been taught iron 
work, weaving, tailoring, laundrying, cook- 
ing, farming and gardening. On the girls' 
side the art of better home-making has not 
been neglected. But our industrial work 
has yet had a mere beginning. 

The depressed classes form a large pop- 
ulation of our field. They are mostly an 
agricultural people, farming their own or 
rented fields, or are in the employ of the 
land owners. They are now open to the 
gospel teaching, and in the north part of 
our territory the awful problem of Indian 
castes offers little or no hindrance to the 
work. Our progress may be measured by 
our ability to furnish competent teachers 
and leaders. But for permanent results 
they must be taught to maintain themselves 
on the necessary higher plane of living. 

When our good doctors came to us we 
rejoiced greatly, for their healing touch 
was a blessing to all. But their greatest 
usefulness became apparent when they 
were given an institution in which to work. 
With their splendid hospital they are able 
to do infinitely more than they could pos- 
sibly do singly or empty-handed. This year 
we rejoice at the coming of a graduate in 
agriculture to our field. Bro. Miller will 
have a work unique in itself. Our doctor 
without a hospital might administer a sin- 
gle dose of medicine in a private house 
that would save a life. But hardly so with 
the agriculture man. His work, to be of 
real value, must be a teaching, and for this 
an institution will be necessary. He must 
teach the people, but he alone can not hope 
to reach the masses. He must prepare 
leaders to go out and touch the people. 



10 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1920 



For this an institution will be indispensa- 
ble. An agriculture school, connected with 
a demonstration and experiment farm, 
should be not only our dream but the real- 
ization of the near future, where boarding- 
school boys may work and see the in- 
creased results of their labor, where school- 
teachers may become acquainted with the 
principles and where advanced students 
may learn the science of agriculture and 
carry it back to their people. 

The late war was won not only by the 



soldiers in the trenches, but by the mobi- 
lized people of all classes in the nation. 
They who dug the coal, they who produced 
the crops, they who laid the rails had just 
as important a part of the war as the sol- 
diers who fired the guns. The gospel of 
the plow may not be essential to the sal- 
vation of any one individual, but this gos- 
pel of industry alone can pave the way for 
the greater Gospel of peace and love. 
Umalla, via Anklesvar, India. 



Trained Workers the Hope of the Mass 

Movement 



I. S. Lohg 




Bible School, Bulsar 

SITTING recently with an experienced 
missionary, I tried to tell him the con- 
ditions and opportunities existing in 
the Brethren Mission in India. He replied, 
"Then your prime need is not money nor 
foreign missionaries, but intelligent and 
consecrated native helpers." 

In this age of training and specialization 
I take it that every one will concede that 
my subject is obviously true. A big job, a 
large movement, requires the trained 
worker. 

The meaning of " trained workers " is 
understood by all. Human nature is much 
the same all around the world. Conditions 
vary, it is true; but for overcoming lethargy 
and carelessness in the non-Christians and 
making them aspire to better things in life 
and for the world to come, leaders whose 
abilities and consecration make them really 
influential are the supreme need. 

About fifteen years ago Raj Pipla State 
seemed ripe unto the harvest and some 
hundreds were baptized into the church. 
Because of workers who were morally unfit 



for their posts, most of those raw Chris- 
tians fell away into a worse state than ever 
before. In our Vyara field, too, the people 
of several villages, once warm and enthusi- 
astic in their love for the Master, have 
grown cold and careless. Sixty-five Chris- 
tian men, of one very large village, under 
the instruction of a good worker a few 
years ago positively refused to climb the 
toddy tree (to bring down the sap, which, 
on being fermented in the sun, is intoxicat- 
ing) ; but today the liquor men tell me that 
only one is a teetotaler in every way. Any- 
where the first gush of love for Christ may 
be stronger than it is some time later. In 
India the main cause for this condition is, 
I think, unqualified teachers, men without 
influence over the flock. 

It is a sad fact that the very large ma- 
jority of village school-children in India 
never get farther in their studies than the 
first standard. The poverty of the people, 
the consequent need for the children to 
help earn the livelihood, and that the value 
of an education is not at all appreciated, 
we concede. Nevertheless, the main cause 
for poor results I dare to put to the account 
of the teacher. One of our Vyara mission 
schools ran for eight years and never had 
any but kindergartners, and of these one 
girl sat in school for three years and never 
even learned the alphabet. With the com- 
ing of a good teacher, that school in the 
last two years has seen a revolution. It 



January 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



11 



makes the missionary's heart glad to visit 
the school today. 

Village school-children have to be called 
to school, daily. The teacher has to go the 
rounds and literally bring them in, else 
they stay at home; and parents are usually 
glad they do, for doesn't some one have to 
care for the baby or graze the pestiferous 
goats and cattle? One of my trained work- 
ers went with me to a village where we 
stayed and taught and sang songs with the 
children and parents for several days. This 
teacher so delighted the children by the 
songs and drills and drum playing that 
they seemed to have been born again. He 
said to me : " If I were teacher in this 
jungle I would not have to go and call the 
children. They would come anyhow." He 
might have been fooled a bit, yet I am sure 
that there is more truth than fiction in his 
statement. 

One old missionary in convention said: 
"We have ten thousand Christians at my 
nation, and yet they come and come, to be 
baptized. To provide workers, we bring in 
raw, intelligent men, and with three 
months' training, beginning with the A B 
C's, song and Bible stories, we give them a 
diploma and send them forth to teach and 
witness for Jesus." This dear old brother 
is doing the best he can ; but what ought 
to be expected of illiterate, raw workers 
who have had only three months' instruc- 
tion for their work? 

Recently I saw a day school of sixty, and 
was told that the Sunday prior there were 
over one hundred in Sunday-school, at a 
place where the' like has not been before. A 
brother said to me, "That place has not 
seen a worker of that type before now." 
Training, like blood, counts. 

In the Bombay Presidency only 5.2 per 
cent of the male, and 1.4 per cent of the 
female population is under instruction. 
The proportion among the backward classes 
is far below that, even. Of 140,000 of these, 
who ought to be in school, not more than 
10,000 of school-going age, or one in four- 
teen, are actually in school. Their parents 
and ancestors tell of one unbroken line of 
ignorance and superstition and nakedness — 
bare backs, empty heads and darkened 
souls. Seven hundred thousand of these in 
our field, and they are reachable ! It is a 
matter of experience in several locations 



of our field that the qualified teacher, 
whether of grown-ups in night school, or of 
children in the day school, can literally 
lead his flock into the church. Tell me, 
then, dear reader, who or what is the hope 
of the large work ahead of us? 

Untrained teachers, who are also only 
nominal Christians, will never make good 
in this glorious outlook. We have tried 
them and have to weep over results. The 
flock look to them and are not fed. Instead, 
they are scolded for not being better Chris- 
tians. We can't go forward, winning and 
baptizing more people, because we are un- 
able to shepherd them. We are not suc- 
cessfully leading them from faith to virtue 
and knowledge and patience and godliness, 
etc., etc. 

Briefly, these backward classes are all 
farming people, and need schooling in- 
timately connected with the work by which 
they earn their bread. Their utter igno- 
rance has been hinted at above. They are 
also almost wholly without religious in- 
struction of any kind. Truly, they are a 
people " having no hope and without God 
in the world." Our plan is to raise up as 
quickly as possible all the teachers we can, 
and put them to work in the villages. The 
more children in the boarding schools, the 
sooner- will our hope be realized. 

The mission is planning a large central 
industrial-agricultural boarding school. It 
is hoped the agricultural part of this pro- 
gram (including intensive and extensive 
farming, dairying, stock raising and horti- 
culture, with needed demonstration in the 
laboratory) will be well cared for by the 
coming this fall of Bro. Arthur Miller, 
agricultural graduate. 

The School of Methods for Teachers, 
where we hope to make teachers, probably 
will be in connection. These teachers will 
also learn not only the theory but the prac- 
tice of many subjects directly related to 
the life of the village people. Later, in due 
time, these same teachers will sit in the 
Bible School, Bulsar, where they will learn 
more fully of Jesus and his love and will 
for the world. Eight years in the board- 
ing school, three years in the School of 
Methods, and from two to three years in 
the Bible School! Thus equipped, they bid 
fair to make good. 

Given 500 or 1,000 men thus trained, men 



12 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1920 



whom God has also called and sent forth, 
and the church in India would grow by 
leaps and bounds. In certain sections of 
India the masses are clamoring to come 
into the Christian church. The same is 
certain to be true in our field. We need by 
prayer and solid effort to prepare the soil 
and raise up workers to meet this onrush. 
Till we have the trained force our work 



is bound to lag and drag heavily on our 
hands. How sad! Yes, it will lag, no mat- 
ter how many foreign workers are on the 
field. The true "Lord's prayer" of today 
is found in Matt. 9: 38. Shall we not pray 
it, and then set about to answer the prayer 
in actual effort to raise up indigenous 
workers, even as the Master did? 
Vyara, India. 



Mass Movement Among the Methodists 



A. T. Hoffert 



THE M. E. Church of India is doing 
work in eight different provinces 
of the country and has a Christian 
community of 300,000. To tell the story 
with some fullness of how the Mass Move- 
ment among them is sweeping upwards of 
40,000 yearly into the kingdom would more 
than fill one number of the Missionary Vis- 
itor. Hence, in this article, I can give only 
a few sidelights of the great Movement. 
Besides the thousands that are being re- 
ceived yearly there are other thousands 
that must be kept waiting because the 
funds available and the present staff of 
teachers and workers are not sufficient to 
teach and shepherd the people as rapidly as 
they are responding to the gospel message. 
The Mass Movement does not mean that 
all the people of a certain district are be- 
coming Christians, but largely- those of a 
certain class, as the Movement runs along 
family and caste lines. It is the outcaste or 
" untouchables " who are without schools, 
without God and without hope in the world, 
that are responding in certain districts as 
a class to the appeal of Christianity. These 
depressed classes have been held down for 
centuries by heartless landlords and the 
more favored classes of India. With their 
response to Christianity and the education 
of their children, there will be a great bet- 
terment of their condition in this life am 
the promise of eternal riches in the life to 
come. 

The first Mass Movement was among the 
mehtars in Northwest India. This is the 
large " sweeper " class of India, who do the 
lowest form of work. In 1870 Robert Hos- 
kins, a many-sided missionary, came to 
Budaon, where he remained until 1885, with 



the exception of his furlough period of two 
years. During that time the Christian com- 
munity of his district increased from 192 to 
947, which was nearly half the entire num- 
ber of Methodist Christians then in this 
country. Concerning his work we read this 
statement in the Mass Movement Era: 
" The mehtars responded readily. He in- 
spired confidence and they came to see him. 
Their best young men learned of him on 
his bungalow veranda and in a measure be- 
came imbued with his spirit of conquest. 
He got them by the dozens and made 
preachers and teachers out of them, send- 
ing them out to win their fellows." Cross- 
ing the River Ganges the people went tell- 
ing of the new religion among their rela- 
tives, several hundred of whom became 
Christians. 

Another great class of " untouchables " 
are the chamers, the tanners and shoe- 
makers of this country, who are considered 
to be a caste higher than the " sweepers." 
Since there are many millions of them 
they also do farm labor and all sorts of 
heavy work. They were the next great 
class of Northwestern India to respond to 
Christianity. The report says: "Now 
they are coming more rapidly than we can 
care for them. Thousands of inquirers 
every day call from villages, and petitions 
are coming, saying, ' Come and teach us.' " 
The headman of a village that has become 
Christian goes to a neighboring village, 
tells of the hopes of the new religion, then 
the call comes for a Christian preacher. 
Thus the movement spreads. The people 
of this class usually call for a school after 
becoming Christians. 

Of the Belgaum district Mass Movement 



January 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



13 



in South India it is stated: "Within the 
short period of thirteen years the Lord has 
multiplied the nine Indian workers into 157, 
and the Christian community of 210 into 
one of 9,017." The Movement is also spread- 
ing among the Balahis, a small tribe of the 
central provinces, and the Sentals, an ab- 
original tribe of nearly one and one-half 
millions, are responding to the Gospel. A 
Mass Movement has set in among the Ma- 
ratas, of whom there are 19,000,000 in West- 
ern India to the south of Gujarat. There 
are now 40,000 Protestant Marati Chris- 
tians. 

One of the largest Movements is among 
the Talugas, who live along the eastern 
coast to the north of Madras. The account 
of the Movement in 1909 reads: " From ev- 
ery direction calls came, ' We want to be- 
come Christians — come.' Those who had 
already received baptism went everywhere 
telling the good news to relatives and 
friends. Meetings often lasted all night. 
In two days I baptized more than five hun- 
dred. Our converts began to be numbered 
by the thousands. By the end of 1909, we 
could not begin to receive the people who 
were knocking at the door of the church. 
Calls would come from villages into which 
we had never yet entered. No one could 
say that it was the work of man, for it was 
far beyond anything that we had imagined. 
From 1903 to 1913, a period of ten years, 
our Christian community increased to 17,- 
391. From 1913 to 1917, or four years, our 
increase was 13,227. These figures repre- 
sent the Hyderabad-Vikerabad district 
only. In one section, Bidar field, the Ta- 
lugas are coming in great numbers, and in 
one part of the Raichur district there is 
also a great movement toward Christ 
among them." 

The following incident at one of their 
outdoor meetings is remarkable: "One 
evening, on the outskirts of the crowd, an 
old man was seen to be walking up and 
down, up and down, with a large stone on 
his head. At first he was thought to be a 
workman about his work; but as he kept 
pacing up and down, one of the mission- 
aries went to him and asked him if he 
would not put the stone down and come 
into the meeting. ' No,' he replied, ' I will 
never put this stone down until peace 



comes into my heart. This stone repre- 
sents the great burden of sin that I am car- 
rying. I was told to come here that I might 
find peace.' Then the missionary talked to 
that dear old man, and pointed him to 
Jesus, the Son of God, and he was convert- 
ed in just the same way that any of us 
have ever been. With stone removed and 
with radiant face, he remained for the rest 
of the summer school meetings." 

To the question as to whether these con- 
verts are real Christians the missionary of 
Hyderabad states: "I think that a larger 
number remain true than among the same 
number of Christians at home. Indeed, 
these simple village people have been able 
to teach us many lessons in our own Chris- 
tian lives." One man, who was cut and 
bleeding from a severe beating, received 
because he was a Christian, afterwards 
stated to the missionary: "They can beat 
me, but they can't take away Jesus!" 

A great Mass Movement began among 
the Dherds, an outcaste and despised class 
of Gujarat, some five years before the fam- 
ine of 1900. Dead animals, which other 
castes will not touch, are disposed of by 
this class. The Movement had its origin 
in Bombay. 

In 1888 a young layman began preaching 
to the " sweepers " of the city. There were 
calls for baptism, and among them were a 
number who had come from Gujarat. When 
these went back to their people in Gujarat 
they began telling them the gospel story. 
These began to call for baptism, and in 
1895 Rev. G. W. Park, then of Baroda, bap- 
tized the first " sweeper " converts of his 
district, among whom were a number of 
Dherds. The Movement spread rapidly 
from village to village, and by the end of 
the season there were 550 baptisms, and 
during the next three years there were 3,- 
825 converts. At one open-air meeting, 
with an attendance of 2,900, there were 225 
applicants for baptism. Then came fam- 
ine, followed by plague and cholera of a 
severe form, which carried off several mis- 
sionaries and thousands among the native 
people. During this time of famine and 
relief work applicants were refused bap- 
tism, yet great numbers of them became 
convinced that the Gospel is true. The 
next year there were 6,291 baptisms, and 



14 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1920 



within six years there were nearly 14,000 
converts. Thousands of Christians died, 
due to a violent outbreak of the plague in 
1904, and the failure of rains added to the 
distress of the people. " In five years the 
death roll was 5,779." Since then it has 
been largely a development of character in 
the membership, rather than a large in- 
crease in numbers. 

From the primary schools in the villages, 
the brighter children are sent to central 
boarding schools, and from there they go 
to teacher-training schools and the theo- 
logical school; others through high school 
and later to the Christian college at Luck- 
now. Since 1909 their theological school 
has been turning out from ten to fifteen 
graduates for the village ministry. There 



is also an industrial training school in Gu- 
jarat and a teacher-training college for 
women. These institutions mean trained 
leadership for coming campaigns, and 
teachers for villages without schools. 

Mr. Bisbee, at the recent Gujarat Con- 
ference, told me that there is now a big 
movement toward Christianity in his dis- 
trict. Within five months he baptized 900. 
He said the secret of success is with the 
workers. When they themselves have ex- 
perienced the riches of God's saving grace, 
people will listen and heed their message. 
Without that they have no power. Dear 
reader, pray much for our Indian workers, 
that they may have the abundant life and 
become valiant witnesses for him! 

Anklesvar. 



The C. M. S. Mass Movement 



H.L. 

THE C. M. S. (Church Missionary So- 
ciety) is a society of the Church of 
England. It has work established in 
nearly all of the principal centers of India. 
Its members have so faithfully represented 
Christ that not only individuals here and 
there, but families, communities, and groups 
of communities have come to realize at the 
same time that somebody cares for them 
and have asked for instruction and baptism. 
Such a movement of the masses towards 
Christ has been experienced by C. M. S. 
workers throughout the country. Indeed, 
it has been so widespread that the society 
has divided its work with reference to the 
Mass Movement into five areas. They are, 
Travancore, Telugu Country, Western In- 
dia, Panjab, and United Provinces. 

A special commission, consisting of two 
Mass Movement missionaries from each 
of the five areas, with a chairman and sec- 
retary, was formed in September, 1916, to 
inquire into the needs, possibilities, and 
problems of the Mass Movement work 
throughout India. This commission im- 
mediately arranged for a concise " survey " 
of the opportunity and need in each of the 
five C. M. S. Mass Movement areas. These 
surveys have been made and published and 
have been greatly used by the "parent 
committee," at Salisbury Square, London, 



Alley 

to inform the whole C. M. S. constituency 
throughout the world of the men and 
means needed to cope with the already 
overripe harvest before it spoils for lack of 
reapers and before today's great opportu- 
nities are lost. 

The commission continues as a perma- 
nent channel through which the whole C. 
M. S. Mass Movement in India makes 
known its opportunities and needs to those 
in the homelands. It is also a powerful 
factor in the coordination of the work in 
the various areas in India, and facilitates 
the interchange of experience. The com- 
mission cooperates with the editorial de- 
partment at Salisbury Square, by supplying 
the editors of the various publications with 
suitable articles of the Mass Movement in 
its many phases. They have also had pre- 
pared a number of Mass Movement films 
for use in the homelands. 

Since October, 1917, the commission has 
been issuing the C. M. S. Mass Movement 
Quarterly as its official organ. The pur- 
pose of the Quarterly is to supply up-to- 
date information to ministers and laymen, 
who try to interest the many who know 
but little of the great opportunities of the 
Mass Movement. From the Quarterlies, 
surveys, and other sources at our disposal 
we have secured the following facts re- 



January 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



15 



garding each of the five Mass Movement 
areas: 

1. Travancore, a native state in South 
India. Present Mass Movement area, 5,- 
000 square miles. Total population, 1,500,- 
000. Outcastes in area, 200,000; 160,000 ac- 
cessible and open to receive the gospel 
message, but not yet gathered into the 
church. The movement here began in 1854, 
when Rev. John Hawksworth baptized the 
first converts from among the outcastes. 
Since then more than 80,000 have been bap- 
tized, who are either alive today or have 
died in the faith. In 1916 outcaste Chris- 
tians numbered 36,410. About 1,000 have 
been baptized each year since. From 3,000 
to 4,000 are being instructed all the time. 
In some areas not a heathen remains; all 
are Christians. In others the movement is 
active, reaching out after those outside. 
While yet other places are said to be "po- 
tential Mass Movement areas." 

In Travancore the people do not live in 
" villages " as in other parts of India. Each 
house has a plot of land on which grows 
an abundance of vegetation and cocoanut 
palms. A central place is chosen, a house 
for school and Sunday worship is erected, 
and the people for several miles around 
come here for instruction. This is called a 
" station " and is in charge of an Indian 
teacher who lives on the spot. Eight or 
ten such stations are grouped for adminis- 
trative purposes and called a " pastorate." 
Such an area is under the charge of an or- 
dained Indian clergyman or pastor who 
lives in the head-station, where there is a 
regular church. A group of such pastorates 
in one area forms what is called a " Dis- 
trict Church Council." Territories in which 
work is being done, not included in the 
councils, are called " Missionary Districts." 

In 1916 the C. M. S. in Travancore had 
213 stations, twenty-four pastorates, deal- 
ing exclusively or chiefly with outcaste con- 
verts, three District church councils, and 
five missionary districts. In 1916 the out- 
caste converts voluntarily contributed five 
thousand dollars towards the work of their 
church. 

Besides the station schools there were in 
1916 three boarding schools, two for boys, 
with sixty boys in each school, and one for 
girls, containing twenty girls. Here the 



C. M. S. workers consider is a weak point, 
and they are appealing for funds to enable 
them to gather many more of the boys 
and girls from the outcaste Christian fam-' 
ilies into the boarding schools, so as to 
train up some of the many workers that 
are needed. 

Travancore and its adjoining native state, 
Cochin, are different from any other part 
of India, in that in 1911 the census showed 
that of the total population of 4,347,085 
more than one-fourth, or 1,132,289, includ- 
ing Roman Catholics and Syrian Chris- 
tians, were Christians. However, the C. M. 
S. workers are anxious to win the other 
three-fourths, and believe that many of 
them can be won within the next few years 
if the workers — Indian and European — for 
whom they are pleading can be supplied. 

2. Telugu Country, an area of some 9,000 
square miles in Southeastern India. It con- 
tains 2,000 villages and 4,000 hamlets or 
collections of huts just outside the villages. 
In these huts the outcaste people live. 
They are looked upon by the caste people 
of the village as "untouchables"; persons 
whose presence in the streets would cause 
pollution and social disgrace. Among these 
people, mostly Malas and Madigas, the 
Mass Movement is very active. 

The Telugu Mission was begun in 1841 
and " owes its origin to the earnest appeals 
of men in the military and civil service of 
the East India Company." From its be- 
ginning to the present time there has been 
steady growth and progress. There are 
now 42,000 Christians. In the past twenty 
years they have trebled their numbers. 
There are forty-six ordained Indian clergy- 
men, and ten more preparing to be ordained 
next year. Each of these pastors has charge 
of from twenty to thirty village congrega- 
tions, of which there are about 350 in the 
mission in as many hamlets. In about 400 
of these hamlets there is also a school, but 
more than 500 of them have no school, and 
more than 400 have asked in vain for a 
resident teacher. 

The Telugu Mission is divided into five 
areas. Each has a girls' boarding school, 
with about fifty girls in each school. Each 
area also has a boys' boarding school. Then 
there is a central boarding school for boys, 
and a normal training school for boys and 



16 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1920 



one for girls. In one district there is the 
Noble College and High School with 1,293 
students, and in two other districts there 
are high schools, one having 728 pupils and 
the other 587 pupils. There is also a the- 
ological school at Dornakal. The Noble 
College is affiliated with Madras Univer- 
sity. Thus there are unlimited opportuni- 
ties in the mission for the promising Chris- 
tian child, even though he has come from 
the poorest hut of the outcaste's hamlet. 
The Mass Movement is causing hundreds 
of these promising boys and girls to be dis- 
covered, and they are being prepared to 
take a great part in the future of the Move- 
ment among the people of their own and 
other castes. Here the plowing has been 
done, the seed has been sown, the harvest 
is overripe and is " spoiling." The need is 
especially for means to enable these hun- 
dreds of high school and college graduates 
to become full-time evangelists and teach- 
ers. 

In 1916 the Indian church in Telugu 
Country contributed seven thousand dol- 
lars. Several congregations and at least 
one pastorate of seventeen congregations, 
embracing 1,300 Christians, are self-sup- 
porting. 

3. Western India. This area is divided 
into two districts, Aurangabad and Nasik 
Collectorate. In the former the Mass Move- 
ment is in full swing, while the latter is 
termed a " potential Mass Movement 
Area." 

In 1860 Rev. Ruttonji Nawraji began the 
Aurangabad Mission. While in charge of 
the work he baptized 1,500 people; but 
through lack of pastoral care many lapsed 
into heathenism and the work has not al- 
ways prospered as it would had the mission 
been adequately staffed. At present the 
outlook is very good. There are now 2,200 
Christians, 757 having been received in a 
recent five-year period. The 2,200 Chris- 
tians live in eighty-three villages. In twen- 
ty of these villages there is also a trained 
Christian teacher and twelve more are 
greatly needed. More schools and workers 
— Indian and European — are the most ur- 
gent requirements. 

In the Nasik Collectorate there are 75,- 
000 mahars, scattered over 5,800 square 
miles, in ten towns and 1,500 villages. The 



mahars have responded to the Gospel in 
other places and the workers here consider 
them open to the gospel message. One 
worker says: "We have prayed and prayed 
that God would open a door for us to enter, 
and here it stands before us wide open." 
Although progress has been slow, the suc- 
cess of the S. P. G., the American Marathi 
Mission, and others working in the same 
or adjoining areas, cause C. M. S. workers 
to believe that if they are properly rein- 
forced from the home base with men and 
means, before them also lie great successes. 

4. The Panjab is in North India. In this 
area there are 2,266,831 of the " untouch- 
ables." Of these 789,857 are known as 
" churas." Among these churas the Mass 
Movement is now active. One thousand, 
five hundred and thirty-two of these people 
were baptized in 1916 and 1,598 in 1917. 
The Movement began here less than thirty 
years ago and now is in full swing. In the 
ten years preceding the last census the 
number of Indian Christians increased 430 
per cent. " The line has been bent back." 
The forces of heathenism are retreating 
and the church is advancing. Thousands 
have been baptized and are growing in the 
faith, while almost all the remaining churas 
are desiring instruction and baptism. The 
difficulty here is to cope with the Move- 
ment, as so many are clamoring for ad- 
mittance at the door of the church. Ade- 
quately to care for those who have come 
and are coming to the church, a large num- 
ber of additional workers are needed. The 
danger of delay is expressed in the follow- 
ing quotation from the survey of the Move- 
ment in the Panjab: "And now, alas, the 
Arya Samajists also are sending out their 
Hindu missionaries into the villages, to 
turn aside the would-be Christians, and 
they, too, are meeting with a certain meas- 
ure of success. We must seize the oppor- 
tunity now, we must enter this door now, 
or it will slam to, and when, in fifteen or 
twenty years' time, if the Lord tarries, we 
send out to the Panjab the men who are 
required now, we shall find that they have 
come too late. The opportunity is a great 
one; an immediate advance is imperative." 

5. The United Provinces are in North- 
east India. Here there are a large number 

(Continued on Page 20) 



January 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



17 



Mass Movement of Wesleyan Methodist 
Missionary Society, South India 



Ella 

THE Wesleyan Mission in Haidara- 
bad State, South India, has been 
dealing with a Mass Movement 
among the Telugu Malas and the Madagas, 
the two great branches of the Panchama, 
or outcaste community. The extent of the 
evangelization of caste Hindus has been 
very small. The mission has felt that its 
chief and absorbing duty is to go to those 
who most want the Gospel and are calling 
for it. The January (1919) report gives 33,- 
000 as the number of baptized Christian ad- 
herents, with thousands of others waiting 
for their opportunity. 

The following is in brief an account of 
the existing organization, the methods 
hitherto followed, and the results accom- 
plished. An evangelist is placed in every 
village where there is a considerable num- 
ber of Christians. With his wife, he is not 
only pastor of the village congregation, 
conducting daily prayers and Sunday serv- 
ices, but also is responsible for the school. 
As a rule the greater part of the teaching 
during the day is given by the wife, and 
she receives remuneration for her work 
separate from the salary of the evangelist. 
Her husband visits outlying villages, in 
which are residing the relatives or acquaint- 
ances of converts. He tours principally 
during the dry season, when travel is eas- 
ier than at other times, and his report is 
brought in to the monthly agents' meeting. 

These evangelists are of two grades, 
known as " B " and " A." The former as a 
rule have been taken direct from the plough 
and the outcaste hamlet, and have had only 
a rudimentary education. The men of the 
"A" grade are of the same origin; but they 
have passed by the way of the boarding 
school into the service of the church. Not 
a few have had seminary training. 

Over these villages, grouped as they are 
from eight to twenty together, are the su- 
perintending evangelists, who usually are 
European missionaries. Often they accom- 
pany the evangelist on his visit to the vil- 



Ebbert 

lages. He directs the workers, and all the 
activities are under his supervision. 

This superintending evangelist has his 
headquarters in one of the most advan- 
tageously-located towns or villages, and 
here are the boarding schools, usually one 
for boys and one for girls. The number of 
children in these schools stands at over 
1,100, which means that on the computation 
usual in India about one in four of all chil- 
dren of school-going age is now in a board- 
ing school. These boarding schools are 
considered the most important educational 
factors at the present time. They are the 
feeders of the higher institutions, such as 
middle schools, middle agricultural school, 
middle vernacular school, middle English 
school. The high schools are the vocation- 
al school, seminary and normal school, 
English high school, and the university. 

One would naturally wonder what effect 
such a system of education and evangelism 
has had and is having upon the people, and 
how these low, ignorant, despised, de- 
pressed " untouchables " respond to this 
teaching. These people have from genera- 
tion to generation been in the clutches of 
the money-lender and land-owner, many of 
whom, both boys and girls, at birth or even 
before, were pledged by their parents, in 
discharge of an old debt. How do these 
born slaves repay the effort which is made 
in their behalf? Experience has proved 
that some at least of these converts have 
genuine Christian faith, for they have lived 
in beauty and obedience. While others 
among them may have been moved by de- 
sire of selfish and sordid gain, it probably 
is true to say of most that they recognize 
as superior to the worship of idols and de- 
mons the service of God, who is One and 
who is as good as he is great. They are 
willing to hear the Word of Christ, and in 
some simple fashion they receive him as 
Teacher and Guide. In nearly all of them 
is a discontent with their lot and a hope 
that in some way the new religion will Tib- 



18 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1920 



erate and raise them. With regard to the 
intellectual capacity of the outcaste, the 
modern history of India furnishes many 
examples of what can be achieved under 
just and sympathetic culture. 

Indeed, the great hope of these people is 
the children, who enter ' the boarding 
schools, and receive an education which 
emancipates them and raises them to a 
higher standard in every respect. Many 
of these students go into government serv- 
ice or into commercial service, in which 
positions, being Christians, they render 
valuable service to their country. There 
are those, to©, who enter the ministry and 
the teaching profession. Not a few reach 
the higher institutions of learning. Two 
young men from this district are studying 
in the Union Theological Seminary at 
Bangalore. One young man, son of an 



outcaste convert, is today reading with 
profit theological literature in English and 
the New Testament in the original. More 
of his kind are sure to follow. 

Inspired of God, this mission is laying 
the foundations of its educational system 
wide and deep, so that neither the hopes 
of the converts are frustrated nor their ob- 
ligations left unfulfilled. They are pouring 
out upon the Haidarabad field the treasures 
of concentrated devotion, and the prophecy 
is being fulfilled: " I will say to them which 
were not my people, Thou art my people; 
and they shall say, Thou art my God. n 
They are assisting in the making of a 
Christian nation by their wisdom of seeing 
and their grace of accepting their great 
part. 

Dahanu, India. 



How to Prepare the Soil for a Mass Movement 



H. P. Garner 




Day and Boarding School Pupils, Jalalpor 



W 



HAT kind of seed is this? What is 
the fruit like? Where does it 
grow? What kind of soil is re- 
quired? How do you prepare the soil? 
These and many other such questions are 
what our gardener asks when given a new 
variety of seed. And it is only natural that 
a good gardener should ask such questions. 
All of them are necessary if you want to 
reap the best harvest possible. If, then, 
this is true with such earthly matters how 
much more so is it true of eternal things! 

Now as we try to give a few thoughts on 
" How to Prepare the Soil for a Mass 
Movement " we will take it for granted that 
the former questions have been answered 



SHi^HHi* ' * ' _ A^s 


-' ' , 3 




K : JP1 














"; i 


Hrfa!' IS 


"s^^oKE 




v-''*£iH 




1 .. * -. .-.'.. _ - - 









Sunday Morning Congregation, Jalalpor 

and confine our remarks to the last one. As 
the writer has never been in touch with a 
Mass Movement what we will say will nat- 
urally take the form of general suggestions 
rather than specific instances. However, 
there is one Mass Movement in which I 
have been specially interested and from 
which, I wish to draw a few practical sug- 
gestions. 

I have always been much interested in 
the Mass Movement of Pentecost, and won- 
dered why we do not have some like it to- 
day. But I think I have overlooked some 
of the essential features leading up to that 
great ingathering into the church. I had 
read, thought, and studied about the ten 



January 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



19 



days' prayer meeting and the coming of the 
Holy Spirit, which was the immediate or 
final preparation of the workers, but how 
about the preparation of the people for this 
movement? 

We trace back through the Holy Record 
and we find that from the Garden of Eden, 
some seventy-four generations before, the 
story of the coming of a Savior was told 
and the promise of salvation to all who 
would believe on him. We follow down 
through the history of the wanderings of 
the Israelites, reigns of the kings, writings 
of the prophets, and the psalms of the great 
musician, and we hear that same familiar 
message, of the appearing of the star of 
Jacob, the coming of the Christ, the Lamb 
that was slain from the foundation of the 
world. It was advertised everywhere. And 
then, as the time drew nearer, John the 
Baptist was sent out to " prepare the way 
of the Lord"; and after preaching for six 
months, or probably nearly a year, we hear 
of Jesus himself coming and proclaiming 
the good tidings of great joy to all the 
world. Jesus taught and sent out preachers 
to do the same. All this, dear ones, was a 
preparation of the people for what hap- 
pened on Pentecost. If we want to reap 
results such as they had that day we must, 
from the preparation of the soil standpoint, 
do at least three things: 

1. We must advertise. Paul, in writing 
to the Romans, says: " How then shall they 
call on him in whom they have not be- 
lieved? and how shall they believe in him 
whom they have not heard? and how shall 
they hear without a preacher?" "Go ye 
into all the world and preach the gospel to' 
all creation." The most of the people do 
not believe the first time they hear the 
story, but it must be told over and over 
again and again. It has been in the older 
missions where this glad story has been 
told for from fifty to a hundred years that 
these Mass .Movements have been taking 
place. 

2. We must get the people to THINK- 
ING. You have no doubt heard the story 
of the old man who had much leisure — so 
much that some one asked him how he 
spent his time. And he replied: "Some- 
times I sit and think, and think, and think, 



and sometimes I just sit." Now there is a 
host of people in this latter condition. They 
just sit. I would say that the most of the 
people of India are just such. They have 
never been used to thinking for themselves 
or anyone else. Their money-lender tells 
them what to do. They wear what clothes 
he gives. They eat the food he doles out 
to them, and their religion is according to 
their liking, so long as it does not infringe 
on his rights. But even their religious du- 
ties are defined by the higher castes. You 
ask them why they do thus and so and 
they reply, "How do we know?" "How 
much debt have you? " And they say, " The 
money-lender knows." If we ask them 
about God, sin, salvation, heaven or hell, 
they simply say they have never thought 
about them. Surely one scripture they ful- 
fill: "Take no thought for the morrow." 
Consequently, until we can teach the peo- 
ple to think for themselves we have a hope- 
less task on our hands. 

3. We must create in them a desire for 
what we want to give them. When the 
writer was working in the office we had 
many salesmen calling. Often we used to 
tell them, " Yes, you have a very good line 
of goods, but we are not in need of any. 
We cannot use them in our business." We 
have a lot of such people in India. " Our 
religion is all right for us and yours is 
good for you." Recently, in talking with 
the government doctor, who is a Brahmin, 
he said, " Your religion is a very good re- 
ligion. You teach the people good things. 
Your Bible is very good." And he could 
quote many Bible sayings, but he also said, 
" No, as for myself I do not want to be- 
come a Christian." Old Chief Sekeletu 
wanted to take his lash and go out and 
make his tribesmen become Christians, but 
Livingstone told him that was not the way 
to make Christians, but that it was a mat- 
ter of " whosoever will." The people have 
not been used to exercising their own wills 
and thinking of their own needs, especially 
from a spiritual standpoint. In fact, the 
lower classes are taught that they cannot 
think, they cannot learn, for they have no 
brains. Our Brahmin pandit used to tell 
us it was no use to teach such low people 
anything, as they cannot learn. But, thank 

BRIDGEWATER COLLEGE LIBRARY 
BRIDGEWAIER, VIRGINIA 



20 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1920 



the Lord, our experience has been different. 
Now you are no doubt wondering why 
we have not had a Mass Movement in our 
mission in India. In my mind there is just 
one reason: the soil has not been prepared. 
And for this lack there are two reasons: 
lack of time and workers. Then " how shall 



they call on him whom they have not be- 
lieved? how shall they believe on him whom 
they have not heard? how shall they hear 
without a preacher? how shall they preach 
except they be sent?" and how shall they 
be sent except they volunteer? 
Vada, Thana District. 



Mass Movements 



(Continued 

of outcastes. Many of them have been 
won for Christ. Boarding schools for boys 
and for girls are making great changes in 
the lives of those who attend them. Prepa- 
ration is being made for an advance on a 
large scale. The future of the Mass Move- 
ment here is bright. 

Through the surveys and other appeals 
that have been made to them by the Mass 
Movement Commission the Parent Com- 
mittee in London has caught a vision of 
the bigness of the C. M. S. Mass Move- 
ment in India. To meet the needs that 
must be met, if continued progress is to 
be made, the committee is appealing to the 
C. M. S. constituency throughout the world 
for ninety thousand dollars and sixty new 
Mass Movement missionaries this year. 
Word has come that two-thirds of the 
money has been given or promised, but no 
news has yet come concerning the number 
of new missionaries available. 

The C. M. S., like all other missionary 
societies, suffered during the war for lack 
of men and money. But few new recruits 
have yet come. Those who served during 
those strenuous years just past are now in 



from Page 16) 

need of rest, and have gone or should go 
on furlough. Hence the pressing need just 
now not only for money but for MEN. A 
little study of the C. M. S. Mass Movement 
reveals that they have done great things 
in this line of mission work. They have 
organized in such a businesslike way that 
with the help of God, for which they all 
are praying, they will meet with greater 
success. With them, as with nearly all 
other missions that have experienced a 
Mass Movement towards Christianity, they 
have had to deal with the outcastes. But 
they are receiving them, and God through 
them is lifting the outcastes in many in- 
stances to a high plane of Christian living. 
Sixty thousand from these depressed 
classes were baptized by the C. M. S. dur- 
ing the five years, 1910-1914. The mission 
that has refused the outcaste has not suc- 
ceeded well in India. 

" God hath showed me that I should not 
call any man common or unclean." 

" Him that cometh unto me I will in no 
wise cast out." 

Dahanu, Thana District, India. 





Weighing Firewood 



Hauling Lumber, Bulsar 



January 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



21 



Learning from Others About Mass Movements 



Wilbur Stover 



PERHAPS, first of all, mention should 
be made of the fact that the more 
thoroughly the work is done the bet- 
ter will be the after-results. The same is 
true, whether numbers be many or few, in 
mission business or in other business. On 
the mission field we must do more than 
baptize people. 

2. I have often said (and I wish here to 
record the thought as an abiding convic- 
tion) that, other things being equal, when 
one good man works for years and gets 
little results, and another good man works 
for years and sees abundant results, this is 
no evidence that the Lord is with the one 
and not with the other. 

3. Long-continued sowing of the good 
seed in any one field, with little results, is 
no sign in itself that the field is hopeless, 
but should be taken by men of faith and 
vision as that much preparation for a great 
day coming — a day when hundreds and per- 
haps thousands may be gathered into the 
fold. Never give up what apparently is a 
hard field. t 

4. Develop plans for aggressive work, and 



then work your plans. This is commonly 
accepted as a good business principle. It 
also is good business for the mission field. 
However, there should be this strong res- 
ervation, if we have faith and vision, that 
if the Lord opens up larger avenues than 
had been planned for, or good ones on dif- 
ferent lines from what had been planned, 
there should be no hesitancy to enter the 
open door. Otherwise, if you wait till you 
are ready, the opportunity may pass and 
the open door be closed. 

5. In dealing with mass movements, a 
last thing I notice in the work of others 
is that they are careful to look after the 
children of the converts. The converts 
themselves often are very raw material, in- 
deed, and not what any one would expect 
as Christians, but their children come nat- 
urally into our hands and are wholly sus- 
ceptible to our teaching. This is an ex- 
ceedingly important item. Let us do all 
that is possible to us now, and the impos- 
sible of today will be possible to us to- 
morrow. 

Anklesvar, Broach District, India. 



Opportunities for Work Among Girls of the 
Depressed Classes 



Olive Widdowson 



THIS subject is one of much interest 
to me, and I know will be to you if 
I can make you acquainted with a 
few of my girl friends among these people. 
Let's take a look at the Anklesvar com- 
pound. There were about one hundred and 
twenty girls in school at Anklesvar when 
I left India, and the number was limited to 
the building accommodations, and soon will 
be limited to the number of girls one mis- 
sionary can supervise. 

I remember many of these girls when 
they arrived from villages near Anklesvar 
about three years ago. Some of the faces 
were old beyond their years. The girls 
scarcely knew their right from their left 
hand. They were filthy, had not learned 



their letters and were from homes gloomy 
with superstition and beliefs in evil spirits. 
Now they have made their grades each 
year, can read well, their faces are brighter 
and younger looking than when they came, 
and they have a desire to be clean. Most 
of them have become Christians. They 
have not only made this growth in them- 
selves, but many have been a rock of 
strength to parents who have accepted 
Christ, but have been sorely tempted by 
people in their village to renounce their 
faith in him. 

Now we will go to a village about seven 
miles from Anklesvar. The " flu " had swept 
through that place and left many house- 
holds motherless. We enter a boarding 



22 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1920 



girl's home. The mother was taken, a little 
baby is left. There is an older sister, who 
has been wanting to come to school, but 
who now finds the way entirely blocked, 
for of course she must care for the baby. 
She is a bright girl. How I wished we 
could get out frequently to that village, to 
encourage and teach her! Her father is a 
drunkard. He has made some good prom- 
ises, but so far has not kept them. You 
would say there is nothing in that home to 
inspire a young girl to rise above the ani- 
mal life which her father is living; nothing 
but hard words and occasional blows from 
the father. She follows us about as we 
visit the homes in the village, and we long 
to take her with us. 

We go on to another village. As we 
draw near we recognize a girl about eleven 
years of age, who one day came to me and 
said that her mother had sent her in to 
stay with her sister in the boarding and 
study. I had my doubts about it, for I 
knew her mother had told the teacher in 
the village that one girl in the boarding 
was enough, and that this girl must stay 
at home and make it easier for the mother 
to earn her living. The father had died 
and left the mother and these two girls. I 
let her stay and go to school, for I knew 
I would soon see the teacher and ascertain 
if it was all right. In about two days the 
mother came in, very angry. She said the 
daughter had run away. After the mother 
had taken the girl her sister was crying. 
I asked the reason, and she said her mother 
would beat her sister. 

These are but typical instances of the 
many we find, with a little variation, in all 
the villages in which we work. These girls 
know they will have to suffer for their ef- 
forts to improve their condition, yet they 
make the attempt. They realize that their 
sisters are getting in school something that 
is transforming their lives. Is none of this 
for the older sisters who are doing their 
part by the little babies left motherless? Is 
none of this for the girls who are forced 
by the short-sightedness of parents to re- 
main at home, a place that may be called a 
house, but not with the greatest stretch of 
our imagination could we see any similarity 
between it and our own homes? Yes, much 



can be done for these girls, and through 
them for their parents. 

During the cold season we should spend 
our time in these villages, seeing that 
schools, suitable as to time and subjects 
taught, are maintained for these children, 
and also work among the parents. When 
the hot season arrives we should-visit these 
villages several evenings in the month and 
see that these hungry minds and spirits are 
being fed. There are many girls in the vil- 
lages left with burdens too heavy for their 
young shoulders. These are not burdens 
that no one can help lift. It seems to me 
that in God's plan there are others who 
should be standing beside the lone mission- 
ary, who has school work (on compound), 
village work and dispensary work, and thus 
make it possible to give the needed help to 
these children. Should they now be assist- 
ed over this hard stretch, it will mean an 
Indian church of strong Christian manhood 
and womanhood. Are we going to stand 
by in our favored America and see them 
crushed under the burden? There are no 
closed doors in this work. 

If you want a good task, one in line with 
the great command given by the Great 
Teacher, not an easy one, but one worthy 
of all t.he tact and spiritual and mental 
strength at your command, it is here. 

Jesus says yet to his disciples: "The har- 
vest truly* is plenteous, but the laborers are 
few; pray ye therefore the Lord of the har- 
vest, that he will send forth laborers into 
his harvest." 

Juniata College, Huntingdon, Pa. 




Girls as They Come Into the Ahwa Boarding School 



January 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



23 



India Notes for October 



Ida C. Shumaker 



AS these notes are being written (Oct. 
31), the last group of our mission- 
aries, Brother and Sister Ross, with 
Pauline and Evalyn, Dr. Nickey, Sister 
Eliza B. Miller, and Nurse Mohler — Sister 
B. Mary Royer having returned earlier — 
are " homeward " bound. They all report 
a "season of refreshing" during the time 
spent at the various hill stations. All are 
truly grateful for the privilege. 

We are glad to report that Sister Arnold 
was able to return to Bulsar today, from 
the Bai Motlibai Obstetric Hospital, Bom- 
bay, where she has been since the night of 
Oct. 17. Because of the seriousness of her 
condition a third doctor was necessary, so 
our Drs. Cottrell, with Bro. Arnold, took 
her to Bombay. On the morning of the 
18th she gave birth to a fine baby boy, 
whose spirit had already taken its flight. 
While our hearts were made sad to have 
this little bud of promise taken from us, 
we are full of gratitude that the life of the 
mother was saved. With Bro. Arnold we 
can say, " For it all we praise our Heavenly 
Father, knowing that his way is best, and 
that all our sorrows shall be turned to joy 
in his own good time. We rejoice now in 
his dear love." 

We are glad also to report that Master 
Herbert Eby, who is in school at Naini Tal, 
has fully recovered from an attack of in- 
fluenza, and from a relapse of the same. He 
is a brave, plucky little fellow, and fought 
the disease heroically. Again we can praise 
our kind Father for his goodness to us. 

A very promising little girl in the Ankles- 
var boarding died of typhoid fever. She 
put up a hard, stiff fight, and the physician 
at Anklesvar had her brought to the dis- 
pensary so he could have her under his 
eye constantly. He did all within his pow- 
er to save this child, but she went from us 
so peacefully. Her parents were with her 
when she fell asleep, never more to wake 
to pain and sorrow. 



God is wonderfully blessing the work in 
the Vada boarding schools. They now have 
seventeen boys and eighteen girls. For 
this we are most grateful. Vada has had a 
long, hard pull, and now they can begin to 
see the " fruits of their labors." Sister Pow- 
ell writes: " You know how much the work 
has been hindered here, but God is bless- 
ing it and I feel sure that many souls will 
yet be garnered for him here. We now have 
a Christian village, and while they are most- 
ly people who are just now being taught, 
we have hopes that they will be Christians 
before long." The remarkable thing is that 
these girls have come to the mission, it not 
being necessary to go after them. The 
girls represent six different castes. To see 
them together, you would not know but 
that all came from the same caste. Most 
of them have but one parent living. The 
girls are admitted, provided the parents will 
give a " writing." Experience has taught 
that such is necessary. 

This is the beginning of our " cold sea- 
son." I just drew some water from the 
pipe, to wash my hands, and it was so hot 
that I burned my fingers. How is that for 
"winter weather" in India? All the farm- 
ers are busy these days, cutting grain and 
grass. From many quarters comes the 
word, " We are having a rupee crop." I 
suppose to you it would mean the same as 
if you were to say, " a bumper crop." We 
are so glad for such reports! We do thank 
and praise our dear Father for sending us 
the needed rain. 

Our whole mission is on its knees be- 
cause of the situation here at Jalalpor. Vic- 
tory for the Lord must be won now, or our 
whole work will receive a deadly blow. Ev- 
erything was moving along very quietly. 
We were getting girls in our boarding 
school as fast as we could. We had over 
sixty children gathered into our day school. 
Our attendance at church and Sunday- 
school services had reached 140. You, who 
know the Jalalpor field, can understand 
what these numbers mean, and what it has 



24 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1920 



cost to get and keep them with us amidst 
the fierce opposition on all sides. 

Our Field Committee decided to select a 
class of workers from the various stations 
in Gujarat, to prepare for the Vernacular 
Final Examination in Surat in April. This 
special class was sent here, under the di- 
rection of Bro. Naranji Vhalji. Oct. 6 
most of these boys were enrolled in the 
government school here. For two days all 
went well. Since then there has been left 
no stone unturned to tear down all our 
work, and to " oust " these Christians. Of 
course we are on the side of law and right. 
The government officials are doing all they 
can to quiet the "protesters," and to help 
them to see their folly. So far they have 
not succeeded. They have taken all their 



boys out of the government school and re- 
fuse to send them as long as our Christian 
boys remain in school. For two days they 
had these boys in a private school, and only 
our boys were in the government school. 
As our boys went by them to school (as 
the word from headquarters said they 
should do) the boys in the private school 
hissed them and acted very unbecomingly. 
Our boys thus far have been able to " act 
well their part," during all these days when 
they have been insulted and mistreated. 
Our constant prayer is that they may be 
able thus to do day by day. Just what the 
outcome will be remains to be seen. This 
school has twenty-three days' vacation 
now, and when it reopens we will know 
more than we now know. There remains 
much more to be said, but we will see what 
the outcome will be. 



China Notes for October 



V. Grace 

THE women's school at Pingting is 
growing in numbers and interest. 
Twenty-one women are enrolled, 
and they come earlier and study harder. 
In addition to their other work they are 
learning to read and write by the new 
National Phonetic System. Bro. Yin, the 
Chinese pastor, speaks to them each Fri- 
day evening on the deeper aspects of the 
Christian life. ^ 

Bro. R. C. Flory, of Liao Chou, is spend- 
ing some time visiting other missions of 
this province, for the purpose of studying 
methods and policies of mission work. 

The pupils of the Girls' School at Ping- 
ting have organized a literary society, the 
active members of which are the fourth- 
year pupils of the lower primary depart- 
ment, and all of the higher primary pupils. 
At their meetings they read some of their 
compositions, debate, tell stories and re- 
port the Sunday sermon. The girls do not 
sleep while the sermon is being preached. 

The Liao medical department took an 
advanced step during the early part of 
October, by electing a hospital business 



Clapper 

committee of three foreigners and three 
Chinese. The work of this committee will 
be to take over the general management of 
the men's and women's hospitals. The 
members of this committee are Dr. Bru- 
baker, Sister Pollock, Bro. N. A. Seese, Dr. 
Yuan, Mr. Yang and Mr. Chao. Mr. Yang 
is one of the language teachers, and Mr. 
Chao is a prominent business man of the 
city, while Dr. Yuan is a member of the 
regular staff of the hospital. 
J* 
The colporters are doing very good work 
with the reflectorscope in the villages sur- 
rounding Pingting. During this month they 
held twenty-two evening meetings. They 
had large and attentive crowds, and we 
hope much good may come to the men, 
women and children from seeing these pic- 
tures and hearing the gospel stories. 

J* 

The boys' and the girls' schools at Shou 
Yang opened on Friday, Oct. 24. Thirty-two 
pupils are enrolled in the boys' school, and 
the girls' school has an enrollment of 
thirteen. ^ 

Oct. 8 two obstetrical cases were ad- 
mitted and delivered in the Pingting hos- 



January 

1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



25 



pital in close succession. One of the two 
got along very nicely, but was unable to 
have a living child, while the other case 
failed to do so well physically, but had a 
splendid baby boy, whom they soon sold 
to the first-mentioned case for the sum of 
three dollars, the purchaser of the infant 
being very proud of her adopted son. 

Sister Hutchison, of the women's work 
department at Liao Chou, writes: "Scarce- 
ly greater was the surprise experienced in 
witnessing the almost universal use of the 
automobile in the States, than was the sur- 
prise experienced on returning to Liao to 
find that the women and the girls of Liao, 
as well as throughout the province, had 
almost universally unbound their feet — an 
undreamed of fact! A custom, which for 
over a thousand years had held its victims 
as with iron fetters, had suddenly, within 
a year's time, practically disappeared, and 
that in Shansi, where the women are said 
to have the smallest feet. This change 
has been wrought largely through the pro- 
gressive measures of Governor Yen, who 
has made the unbinding compulsory, in- 
flicting fines and imprisonment when dis- 
obeyed. We praise the Father for these 
changes, and pray that he may enable us 
at this opportune moment to be diligent in 
taking for his kingdom this province, whose 
soil was made sacred by the blood of the 
martyr in 1900." ^ 

The administration building of the hos- 
pital at Pingting is now in process of con- 
struction under the management of Bro. J. 
Homer Bright. & 

Bro. N. A. Seese, of the Liao Chou Boys' 
School, writes: "At the present time there 
is quite a rejuvenation in education in this 
province. The immediate cause of this is 
the attitude of the governor. He has is- 
sued a mandate making it compulsory for 
children, both boys and girls, to attend 
school. This mandate of course could not 
be enforced were it not that sentiment had 
been created previous to the decree. For 
the development of this sentiment, the 
missionaries have probably done as much 
as any other agency. The mission schools 
in the years past have taken in the rich and 
the poor, the well-dressed and the ragged 
alike, and thus have put themselves on 



record as favoring universal education. 
The Chinese are now coming to see that 
China cannot advance with 10 per cent of 
her people literate and 90 per cent illiter- 
ate. The mission schools are receiving 
their share of the increased number of stu- 
dents. At Liao Chou there are ninety-four 
students in the boys' school and more are 
expected soon. Our accommodations are 
taxed to the limit. Our equipment is en- 
tirely inadequate properly to care for this 
many boys, and we would refuse to admit 
them were it not for the fact that they 
would get no better in the government 
school for the next year or so. We hope 
that by that time we can enlarge and im- 
prove our facilities sufficiently to care rea- 
sonably well for their needs. We are im- 
proving the facilities for play, hoping that 
by proper outdoor exercise we can counter- 
act part of the evil effects of poor housing. 
The board has granted us a sum of $500 
(Mex.) for industrial work. This will fill 
a long-felt need. The out-station schools 
have an increased attendance. There are 
about 100 students altogether in the three 
out-station schools. At two of these the 
Chinese have agreed to pay for the work 
if we furnish the material for making sev- 
eral new desks and seats. This is evidence 
of very unusual interest on the part of the 
Chinese. ^ 

The regular attendance at the preaching 
service at Shou Yang has been increased 
by the addition of over thirty boys and 
twelve girls from the schools. With this 
increase our chapel is entirely too small to 
accommodate the people. One of our great- 
est needs is a suitable place in which to 
worship. The same condition exists at 
Ching Chuan, our out-station. The build- 
ings which we have rented are too small to 
accommodate the people. Recently Bro. 
Crumpacker preached for us at our evening 
service at the street chapel. He also went 
with Bro. Heisey to visit the out-station to 
see about securing larger quarters. 

We are very glad for the assistance of 
the teacher who is helping in the boys' 
school. He is a graduate of college, and 
comes with a very good Christian spirit. 
He plans later to continue his study in some 
Bible school. Showyanghsien, Shansi, China. 



26 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1920 




Lukshmi's Story to the Visitor Children 



B. M. R. 



MY name is Lukshmi, and my little 
sister's name is Jeevie. We are in 
the Girls' Boarding School at 
Dahanu. Jeevie is rather a little girl to be 
in a boarding school, but there is a reason 
for her being here. Thinking you children 
in America would like to know how we got 
here, I'm going to tell you. 

During the past hot season, when there 
was famine in our country, we, like so 
many other people, had very little to eat. 
There were four in our family — my mother, 
a brother about six years old, Jeevie, who 
is three, and myself. I am eight. 

Everything was scarce — even work. We 
heard there was work at the Dahanu rail- 
way station. So we went there and my 
mother got work loading coal (charcoal) 
cars. The man for whom we worked gave 
us a corner in a freight car where we slept 
at night. We did our cooking under the 
trees. 

Mother earned eight cents a day. The 
food we could buy for that amount was 
more than we had had for many a day, and 
we ate heartily. One day mother got very, 
very sick. The coal dealer told us there was 
a Doctor Miss Sahib, not very far away, 
and that we should go there and she 
would help us. An aunt of mine was 
working at the same place. She helped 
mother to the mission compound, and I 
took Jeevie. We went the shortest way 
and came in through the wire fence at the 
back. Mother was quite worn out when 
we got here and lay down on the ground 
just inside the fence. We left Jeevie and 
my brother with her and I went back to get 
our things. Everything we owned was in 
a basket about the size of a half bushel; a 
few earthen cooking vessels, several plates 
and bowls and a few old burlap sacks 
which were our beds. 

By the time I returned the doctor had 



found my mother and was giving her medi- 
cine. She and her nursebai (Indian name 
for lady) placed her on a cot, and several 
men carried her across the compound to a 
nice brick house and put her in a room 
with white walls and a nice, clean cement 
floor. This was the dispensary. The doc- 
tor and her nursebai were so kind to us, 
and you can never know how thankful we 
were for all they did for us. Mother was 
so eager to get well, she asked Doctor Miss 
Sahib not to give her too much medicine, 
as she wanted to get well so she could care 
for her children. The doctor said, " We, 
too, want you to get well. That is why we 
are giving you medicine." They gave us 
children a good rice dinner and that after- 
noon we had a nice sleep. 

The next morning my brother was sick. 
He was very stubborn and would not take 
his milk and medicine. Sometimes he 
would strike the nursebai and the medicine 
went on the floor. Then she or Doctor 
Miss Sahib would fix up another dose and 
try it again. 

The next day I was sick and here there 
is a break in my story. I don't know what 
happened for some, days after that. I was 
too sick. When I got better I found that 
Jeevie and I were alone in the room. I just 
remember seeing my brother carried out 
the first day I was sick. But I knew noth- 
ing of mother's going. I thought at first 
she got well and went away and left us. 
Of course she would never have done such 
a thing. It was cholera that took her and 
my brother away. The Doctor Miss Sahib 
told me so kindly about it. She said we 
could have a home here and would be well 
cared for. The nursebai also kept telling 
me that the sahib people would keep us and 
be kind to us. But that didn't satisfy me. 
I wanted my mother. I cried and cried for 
hours sometimes. Then, too, I was a bit 



January 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



27 



afraid of sahib people. I couldn't under- 
stand why they should want to keep Jeevie 
and me, and I was determined they 
shouldn't. 

The Doctor Miss Sahib and her nursebai 
were afraid I might run away, so the out- 
side door of our room was screened, but 
the windows were not. One day when I 
thought no one would see, we slipped away 
to go back to our village. Before we got 
halfway across the compound an Indian 




Lukshmi and Jeevie 



Christian woman saw us. She called to the 
Miss Sahib in the bungalow, who came at 
once and took us back to the dispensary. 
If she hadn't, I'm afraid I wouldn't be here 
to tell you this story, for Jeevie and I also 
had cholera. And though we were getting 
well, it was most important that we should 
have proper care for some time yet and 
no one would have cared for us as the mis- 
sionaries did. But to this day they cannot 
understand how I, in my weakness, got 



Jeevie and myself out the window, for it is 
over four feet from the ground. 

The next day there was a hut built for 
us, close to the boarding girls' hut. We 
could hear them sing and see them go 
about their work, and from that time I be- 
gan to be more satisfied. Now I like it so 
well I'm afraid I should have to cry pretty 
hard if I had to leave. 

The latter part of June the boarding girls 
moved into the new building and I was 
well enough to go with them. At that time 
there were a few orphan babies here, and 
a bai from Bulsar was taking care of them. 
Jeevie also was given into her care, so 
that I could be free to go to school. But 
she didn't like that bai. She ran off to the 
school to be with me whenever she could. 
She wasn't ^stubborn when she had to go 
back. She just cried, never smiled and 
always looked so sad. After a little while the 
Miss Sahibs said it would never do to make 
her stay with that bai whom she didn't 
like, and they would let her come and live 
in the school with me. That's the reason 
she is in boarding school. Jeevie was not 
so sick as I. She seems to know that 
mother died and that I am all that is left 
to her. For many days she followed me 
everywhere I went and seemed to be 
afraid I might go away and leave her. She 
is as happy as can be now, and so am I. 




Bringing a patient to the dispensary — Bulsar. This 
man's foot was nearly eaten off by some country 
native medicine which he had applied. After one 
month's treatment it is beginning to heal. These 
men are both baptized Christians. 



28 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1920 




FINANCIAL R 




During the month of November the Board sent 
out 150,044 pages of tracts. 

Corrections. The $395.30 credited to the World- 
Wide Fund in the August Visitor should have been 
credited to Special Support of Elizabeth Oberholtzer. 

$50.00 credited to Kansas in the Conference offer- 
ing reported in the October Visitor should be cred- 
ited to an individual in Larned Congregation. 

The $12.50 credited to Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Kein in 
the- India Share Plan report in the December Vis- 
itor should be credited to Coventry Congregation 
in the District of Southeastern Pa., N. J. and N. Y. 

Franklin Rhodes should have been credited with 
$1,000 in the Dec. Visitor for Ping Ting Hospital. 

WORLD-WIDE 
Pennsylvania— $75.87 

Eastern District, Congregation 

Upper Dublin 4 69 

Sunday-school 

Zieglers, n 86 

Southern District, Individuals 

D. B. Hosteller, $11; George Stroup, $6.32, 17 32 

Middle District, Congregation 

Riddlesburg, 10 00 

Individual 

Mary Kinsey 10 00 

Western District, Individuals 

Mrs. C. Forney and daughters, $15; 
Thomas A. Hardin & Son, $1; Sarah Bar- 
ron, $1; Mrs. Anna Garber, $2; E. G. Het- 

rick, $3, 22 00 

Ohio— $106.40 

Northeastern District, Congregation 

Black River, 6 90 

Sunday-school 

West Nimishillen 20 00 

Individuals 

Laura Swander, $1; Lucile Longnecker, 
$10; Marie Pontius, $1; Clara Halloway, 
$1; Thos. Arnold and wife, $5; Geo. Harts- 

ough, $5, 23 00 

Northwestern District, Individual 

S. H. Smith, 10 00 

Southern District, Congregation 

Pleasant Hill, 25 00 

Individuals 

S. S. girls (3), $15; Katie Beath, $2; Min- 
nie Chalfont, $3; Edgar Schooley, $1.50, .. 21 50 
Maryland— $819.48 
Eastern District, Congregation 

Pleasant Hill, 18 09 

Individuals 

Lizzie Klein, $10; Mrs. D. A. Erbaugh, 

$1 1100 

Western District, Individual 

Mrs. A. C. Auvil, ; 100 

Middle District, Individuals 

Adaline Neswander, $784.39; Bro. A and 

Sister B, $5, 789 39 

Virginia— $104.51 

Second District, Individuals 

Jno. D. Wampler, $2; W. H. Zigier, $1, .. 3 00 

Northern District, Individuals 

Joseph M. Wampler, $75; N. W. Coffman, 

50c, 75 50 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Christiansburg, 10 28 

Individuals 

Mrs. Nanie Sutphin, $5; Sarah J. Hylton, 

700 

astern District, Sunday-school 

Hollywood 8 73 

Indiana— $48.88 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

West Goshen 20 68 

Individual 

A. W. G., 1000 

Middle District, Individual 

J. H. Wright (Mar. Not.) 50 

Southern District, Individuals 



Ettie E. Holler, $10; Harry A. Smetzer. 
$5; Wm. Buchannon (Mar. Not.), 50c; R. 
M. Arndt, $2.20, 17 70 

Illinois— $163.35 

Northern District, Individuals 

P. F. Eckerle, $1.10; Miss Annie Rich- 
ardson, 25c 1 35 

Congregation 

Pine Creek, 55 00 

Southern District, Congregation 

Virden 100 00 

Individuals 

Mrs. B. S. Kindig, $5; Miss Lizzie Ger- 
gen, $2, 7 00 

Minnesota— $20.11 

Congregation 

Lewiston 10 11 

Individuals 

Harvey and Anna Long, 10 00 

Wisconsin— $33.71 
Congregations 

Stanley, $12.52; Rice {.ake, $21.19, 33 71 

Louisiana— $100.00 
Individuals 

John and Lucy Metzger, 100 00 

South Dakota— $25.00 
Individuals 

D. R. Baldwin, $20; I. C. Myer, $5 25 00 

Washington— $22.00 
Individuals 

Anna Castle, $10; Christian Krabill, $10; 
Grace Falmer, $1; Mrs. Roston Welsh, $1, 22 00 

Missouri — $75.25 
Northern District, Congregation 

Rockingham, 65 25 

Southwestern District, Individual 

Mary Mays 10 00 

Michigan— $29.20 
Individuals 

G. F. Deardorff, $21.70; D. W. Vaniman, 
$5; A Friend, $1; C. L. Wilkins (Mar. 

Not.), 50c; Sister W. H. Kreigh, $1, 29 20 

Kansas— $4.52 

Northeastern District, Individual 

Geo. A. Fishburn, 52 

Southwestern District, Individuals 

Mrs. A. L. Walker, $2; Katie Yost, $2, .. 4-00 

West Virginia— $18.00 
First District 

Brights Hollow Mission Study Class, .. 2 00 

Second District, Congregation 

Beans Chapel, 16 00 

Tennessee — $15.00 
Congregation 

Knob Creek 5 00 

Individual 

Mollie Satterfield, 10 00 

Oregon — $10.00 
Individual 

Vernie Nine, 10 00 

New Mexico — $1.00 
Individual 

J. S. Forehand, 100 

Nebraska— $6.20 
Sunday-school 

Octavia, 6 20 

Idaho— $6.30 
Sunday-school 

Nampa 6 30 

California— $2.00 

Southern District, Individuals 

Pvt. Walter M. Moore, $1; Mrs. Nancy 

Underhill, $1, 2 00 

Iowa— $11.00 

Northern District, Individuals 

Mrs. Parker Ruble, $10; W. H. Lichty, 



January 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



29 



50c, 10 50 

Middle District, Individual 
J. B. Spurgeon (Mar. Not.), SO 

Oklahoma— $17.08 

Congregations 

Thomas, $2; Elk City, $5.08, 7 08 

Individuals 

J. W. Murray and Wife, 10 00 

Colorado— $7.21 

Western District, Individual 

Mrs. W. H. Heiny, 100 

Aid Societies of Nebr. and Colo., 6 21 

North Dakota— $0.50 
Individual 

D. M. Shorb (Mar. Not.), 50 

Total for the month, $ 1,722 57 

Conference offering for Nov., 2,866 46 

Previously reported 145,276 36 

Total for the year, $149,865 39 

HOME MISSIONS 
Kansas— $1.85 

Southeastern District, Individual 

Fannie Stevens, 185 

Tennessee — $1.00 
Individual 

J. A. Murray, 100 

Total for the month, $ 2 85 

Previously reported, 308 53 

Total to date, $ 31138 

INDIA MISSIONS 

Pennsylvania — $47.82 

Middle District, Congregations 

Burnham, $5; Dry Valley, $16.71, 21 71 

Christian Workers Society 

James Creek, 3 30 

Sunday-schools 

Smithfield, $7.49; Ardenheim, $9.32, 16 81 

Eastern District, Individuals 

Bro. Y. Y., $5; Linda B. Huber, $1 6 00 

West Virginia— $5.00 
Second District, Individuals 

J. C. Cutwright, $2.50; C. E. Bean, $2.50, 5 00 

Maryland— $10.00 
Western District, Individuals 

I. W. Abernathy and wife, 10 00 

Illinois— $5.00 

Northern District, Individual 

E. A. Frantz 5 00 

Washington— $5.00 

Individuals 

Sherman Stookey and wife, 5 00 

California— $3.00 

Southern District, Individuals 

Mrs. Nancy Underhill, $2; Pvt. Walter 

M. Moore, $1, 3 00 

INDIA NATIVE WORKER 
California— $105.00 
Southern District, Individuals 

A Brother, $75; Isaiah and Olivene Bren- 

aman, $30 105 00 

Alabama— $47.30 
Congregations 

Fruitdale, Cedar Creek, Brewton and 

Mobile 47 30 

Illinois— $50.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

F. G. 50 00 

Indiana— $1730 

Northern District, Sunday-schools 

Joint Sunday School Association 17 50 

Virginia— $15.00 

Northern District, Aid Society 

Bridgewater 15 00 

Pennsylvania— $10.00 
Middle District, Individual 

Frances Baker, 10 00 

Maryland— $5.00 # 

Eastern Distric't, Sunday-school 

Edgewood, 5 00 



INDIA BOARDING SCHOOL 
Missouri— $172.45 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

King's Daughters Class, 8 75 

Individuals 

T. W: Tracey, $35; Mary Nicholson, $35; 
No. Dist. of Missouri, $23.70; Grace D. 

Bowman, $35, 128 70 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Fair View, 17 00 

Southwestern District, Individual 

Rebecca Mays, •. 18 00 

Indiana— $45.65 

Northern District, Sunday-school Class 

Children of the King, 5 15 

Middle District, Sunday-school Class 

Willing Workers 8 75 

Individual 

Edith Sees, 8 00 

Southern District, Christian Workers 

Kokomo, 17 50 

Sunday-school Class 

King's Daughters Class, 6 25 

Ohio— $68.75 

Northwestern District, Sunday-school 
Classes 

Junior and Intermediate (Beach Swamp), 

$35; Girls of Silver Creek S. S., $15, 50 00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Junior boys and girls (Clayton S. S.), .. 18 75 

Pennsylvania — $40.00 
Eastern District, Individual 

Bro. Y. Y., 5 00 

Sunday-school Class 

Sunshine (Maple Springs), 35 00 

Kansas— $20.00 

Southwestern District, Individual 

Mrs. T. N. Carter 20 00 

Virginia— $30.00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Smith River 5 00 

Northern District, Aid Society 

East Mill Creek, 25 00 

Iowa— $28.62 
Middle District 

Panora— Coon River Mission Circle, 7 75 

Aid Society 

Maxwell, 87 

Southern District, Aid Society 

Libertyville, 20 00 

Colorado— $18.00 

Western District, Congregation 

Grand Junction, 18 00 

INDIA SHARE PLAN 
Ohio— $100.00 

Northern District, Individual 

Claude V. Gore 50 00 

Northeastern District, Individual 

Elizabeth Toms 50 00 

Pennsylvania— $100.00 
Eastern District, Individual 

Leroy Clemens, •••_•-. 25 00 

Western District, Individual 

J. E. Eicher, 50 00 

Middle District, Individuals 

S. L. Fyock and wife 25 00 

Maryland— $100.00 

Eastern District, Individual 

Miss Grace Bergen, 50 00 

Middle Drstrict, Individual 

Sister A. Ausherman '50 00 

Missouri— $150.00 

Northern District, Individuals 

N. S. Rhodes and wife, $100; Rawley 

Sandy, $50, 150 00 

Indiana — $72.50 

Southern District, Sunday-school Class 

Loyal Workers (Union City) 12 50 

Individual 

Floyd McGuire, 10 00 

Middle District, Individuals 

Bro. and Sister J. E. Ulrey, 50 00 

Illinois— $25.00 

Southern District, Individuals 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer M. Hersh, 25 00 



30 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1920 



Oregon— $15.00 

Christian Workers' Society 

Myrtle Point IS 00 

West Virginia— $25.00 

Second District, Sunday-school 

Beans Chapel » 12 50 

Individuals 

Mr. and Mrs. F. F. Valentine 12 50 

Total for the month, $ 587 50 

Previously reported, , 450 00 

Total for the year so far, $ 1,037 50 

INDIA WIDOWS' HOME 

California— $1.00 

Southern District, Indiviual 

Pvt. Walter M. Moore 100 

West Virginia— $3.00 
Second District, Individuals 

J. C. Cutwright and C. E. Bean, 2 00 

Total for the month, $ 3 00 

Previously reported, 92 10 

Total to date, '..$ 95 10 

INDIA FAMINE RELIEF 

Michigan— $5.00 

Individuals 

Mrs. H. C. Lowder, $2; A brother and 

sister (New Haven Congregation), $3 5 00 

Pennsylvania — $5.00 
Eastern District, Individual 

Bro. Y. Y 5 00 

Kansas— $5.00 

Southwestern District, Individual 
Mrs. Alice Vaniman, 5 00 

Total for the month $ 15 00 

Previously reported, .: 6,492 70 

Total to date, $ 6,507 70 

INDIA ORPHANAGE AND TRAINING 
DEPARTMENT 
Virginia— $35.00 

Northern District, Aid Society 

West Mill Creek, 35 00 

Ohio— $25.00 

Southern District, Congregation 

Sidney 25 00 

Pennsylvania— $5.21 

Western District, Individual 

Miss Florence Morris 5 21 

Total for the month, $$ 65 21 

Previously reported 44 00 

Total to date $ 109 21 

ANKLESVAR GIRLS' SCHOOL BUILDING 
Iowa — $65.00 

Middle District, Aid Society 

Muscatine, $5; Prairie City, $10, 15 00 

Northern District, Individual 

R. H. Glessner 50 00 

Maryland— $20.00 

Eastern District, Aid Society 

Washington City, 20 00 

Nebraska — $15.00 

Aid Society, Lincoln 15 00 

Virginia— $8.67 

Northern District, Aid Society 
Manassas, 8 67 

Total for the month 108 67 

Previously reported 12 15 

Total to date $ 120 82 

INDIA SCHOOL DORMITORIES 

Kansas— $1,000.00 

Northeastern District, Individual 
Enoch Derrick 1,000 00 



INDIA HOSPITAL 
Pennsylvania — $5.00 

Eastern District, Individual 
Bro. Y. Y., 5 00 

Total for the month, $ 5 00 

Previously reported 43 50 

Total to date, $ 48 50 

CHINA MISSIONS 
Iowa— $91.23 

Northern District, Congregations 

Kingsley, $8; Sheldon, $30.92, Slifer, $5.23, 

Root River, $13 57 15 

Southern District, Congregation 

Fredericksburg, 23 83 

Donations for Visitor from Iowa and 

Minnesota 10 25 

Minnesota— $34.26 
Congregations 

Washington, $20.26; Deer Creek, $4, 24 26 

Sunday-school 

Excelsior Class, - 10 00 

Pennsylvania — $12.00 
Eastern District, Individual 

Bro. Y. Y, 5 00 

Sunday-school 

Willing Workers Class, 2 00 

Western District, Individual 

John Umhey 5 00 

Indiana — $10.00 

Northern District, Individual 

A. W. G., 10 00 

Washington — $5.00 
Individuals 

Sherman Stookey and wife, 5 00 

Michigan — $3.15 

Sunday-school 
Young Peoples' Class (Hart S. S.), 3 15 

California— $3.00 

Southern District, Individuals 

Mrs. Nancy Underhill, $2; Pvt. Walter 
M. Moore, $1 3 00 

Kansas— $2.00 

Northwestern District, Individual 
I. B. Garst, 2 07 

Ohio— $9.03 

Southern District, Congregation 
Covington, 9 03 

Total for the month $ 169 67 

Previously reported, 747 37 

Total to date, $ 917 04 

CHINA NATIVE WORKER 

California— $97.50 

Southern District, Sunday-schools 

Empire, $37.50; Inglewood, $60, 97 50 

Indiana— $35.00 

Northern District, Individuals 

Chas. Eaton, $15; Mrs. Noah Shively, $20, 35 00 

Michigan— $15.00 
Congregation 

Elmdale 15 00 

Pennsylvania — $10.00 
Middle District, Individual 

Mrs. Frances Baker, 10 00 

Colorado — $10.00 
Sunday-school 

Wiley Bible Class, 10 00 

Iowa— $6.16 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Greene, 6 16 

Total for the month, $ 173 66 

Previously reported, 356 67 

Total to date $ 530 33 

CHINA GIRLS' SCHOOL 

California— $47.00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 
Elder Sisters' Bible Class 17 00 



January 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



31 



Individuals 
Bro. and Sister Frank Hepner, 



30 00 



Virginia— $43.17 

Second District, Sunday-schools 
Elementary Dept. of Summit and Glade, 43 17 

Total for the month $ 90 17 

Previously reported, 154 47 



Total to date $ 244 64 

CHINA BOYS' SCHOOL 
Ohio— $7.00 

Southern District, Congregation 
Salem 7 00 



Total for the month, $ 7 00 

Previously reported, 243 20 



Total to date, 

CHINA HOSPITAL 

Pennsylvania — $22.20 

Eastern District, Congregation 

Harrisburg, 

Individual 

Bro. Y. Y 

Iowa— $8.63 

Middle District, Aid Society 

Maxwell, 

Panora — Coon River Mission Circle, 

California— $1.00 

Southern District, Individual 

Pvt. Walter M. Moore, 



250 20 



17 20 
5 00 



7 75 



1 00 



Total for the month, $ 3183 

Previously reported 449 28 



Total to date $ 481 11 

PING TING HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 
BUILDING 
Iowa— $14.65 

Middle District — Aid Society 
Muscatine, $4.65; Prairie City, $10, 14 65 

Nebraska— $15.00 

Aid Society 

Lincoln, 15 00 

Virginia— $8.00 

Eastern District, Aid Society 

Manassas, 8 00 



Total for the month $ 37 65 

Previously reported, 12 15 



Total to date, $ 49 80 

LIAO CHOU GIRLS' SCHOOL FURNISHINGS 
California— $30.00 

Southern District, Individuals 
Emma Brubaker, $20; Mary Zug, $10, 30 00 



Total for the month, $ 30 00 

LIAO CHOU HOSPITAL 
Minnesota — $35.72 

Sunday-school 

Gleaners Class (Deer Park S. S.) 35 72 

Pennsylvania — $5.00 

Eastern District, Individual 

Bro. Y. Y., 



5 00 



Total for the month $ 40 72 

Previously reported, 113 50 



Total to date, $ 154 22 

CHINA DISPENSARY 
Illinois— $16.25 

Southern District, Sunday-school 
Young Men's Class (LaPlace S. S.) 16 25 



Total for the month, $ 16 25 

Previously reported 45 00 



Total to date, $ 6125 

CHINA WIDOWS* HOME 
Pennsylvania— $5.00 



Eastern District, Individual 
Bro. Y. Y., 



5 00 



Total for the month, $ 5 00 

CHINA ORPHANAGE 
Pennsylvania — $5.00 
Eastern District, Individual 

Bro. Y. Y., 5 00 



Total for the month $ 5 00 

Previously reported 417 64 



Total to date $ 422 64 

SWEDEN MISSIONS 



Indiana — $5.00 

Middle District, Individual 
'A brother, 



5 00 



Total for the month, $ 5 00 

Previously reported, 15102 



Total to date, $ 156 02 

MALMO BUILDING FUND 
Pennsylvania — $66.07 

ngregations 

66 07 



Eastern District, Congregations 
Tulpehocken, $60.07; Shamokin, $6, 



Total for the month $ 66 07 

Previously reported, 1,509 50 



Total to date $ 1,575 57 

SWEDEN RELIEF 



Maryland— $15.00 

Middle District, Individual 

A brother 

Ohio— $15.00 

Southern District, Individuals 
Viola and Mary Miller, 



15 00 



15 00 



Total for the month, $ 30 00 

Previously reported, 15 00 



Total to date, $ 45 00 

DENMARK MISSIONS 



Indiana — $5.00 

Middle District, Individual 
A brother, 



5 00 



Total for the month and year $ 500 

BROOKLYN MISSIONS 

Pennsylvania— $5.00 

ndividual 

5 00 



Eastern District, Individual 
Bro. Y. Y 



Total for the month, $ 5 00 

Previously reported, 10 05 



Total to date, $ 15 05 

AFRICA 



Ohio— $5.00 

Northeastern District, Individuals 
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. W. Lowver, 



5 00 



Total for month and year, $ 5 00 

STUDENT FELLOWSHIP FUND 

Pennsylvania— $50.00 

Middle District 
Juniata College, 50 00 



Total for the month, $ 50 00 

Previously reported, 2,792 77 



Total to date, $ 2,842 77 

CONFERENCE OFFERING FOR NOVEMBER 
WORLD-WIDE 
Indiana — $695.45 

Northern District, Congregations 
Goshen City, $137.70; Tippecanoe, $50; 

Maple Grove, $50, 237 70 

Individual 
Mrs. D. J. Whitehead, 2 75 

Middle District, Congregations 



32 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 

1920 



Eel River, $50; Spring Creek, $100; Mex- 
ico, $100; Salimonie, $100, 350 00 

Individuals 

Mrs. I. B. Miller, $100; S. C. Miller. $5, . 105 00 

Virginia— $655.00 

Northern District, Congregations 

Greenmount, $100; Beaver Creek, $150, . . 250 00 
Individuals 

B. W. Neff and wife 100 00 

Aid Society 

Bridgewater, • 50 00 

Sunday-school 

Adult Bible Class (Harrisonburg S. S.), 10 00 

Second District, Congregation 

Elk Run 85 00 

Aid Society 

Elk Run, 10 00 

Sunday-school 

Summit, 50 00 

Eastern District, Individual 

I. A. Miller 100 00 

Pennsylvania — $236.00 

Southeastern District, Congregations 

Coventry, $35; Norristown, $25, 60 00 

Hatfield Mission Study Class, 25 00 

Western District, Congregation 

Glade Run 100 00 

Individual 

Dasin Watson, 100 

Eastern District, Congregation 

Little Swatara, 50 00 

Ohio— $945.01 

Northwestern District, Congregations 

Wyandot, $50; Bellefontaine, $90 140 00 

Southern District, Congregations 

Harris Creek, $50; Covington, $500 550 00 

Sunday-school 

Salem 205 01 

Northeastern District, Sunday-school 

Young Married Peoples' Class (Akron S. 
S.), a.. 50 00 

Illinois— $125.00 

Northern District, Individuals 
A. R. Workman, $50; F. H. Slater and 

wife, $10, 60 00 

Aid Society, Sterling, 5 00 

Southern District, Congregation 
Decatur 50 00 

Individual 
John Kitson, 10 00 

Michigan— $50.00 

Congregation 

Thornapple, 50 00 

Iowa— $50.00 

Northern District, Individual 

S. S. Neher, 50 00 

Maryland— $40.00 

Middle District, Congregation 

Pleasant View, 40 00 

Missouri— $25.00 

Northern District, Individual 

Mary Ellenberger 25 00 

Tennessee— $25.00 
Congregation 

Pleasant View 25 00 

Kansas— $10.00 

Southwestern District, Aid Society 

Monitor, 10 00 

Texas— $10.00 
Individual 

Mrs. Cora Leicht 10 00 

Total for the month $ 2,866 46 

Previously reported, 128,712 36 

Total to date, $131,578 82 

ARMENIAN AND SYRIAN RELIEF 

California .*«,'•.-.'« 

Covina S. S., $77.10; Junior Christian En- 
deavor, Covina, $4.22; Estate of Mary 
Gnagey, Pasadena, $10; Mrs. Nancy D. Un- 
derbill, Pomona, $3; Glendora Church, 
$613.91, $ 708 23 



Illinois 

Polo Church, $20; Woodland Church, $212; 
Batavia S. S., $5; Sterling Church, $17.23; 
Cerro Gordo S. S., $154.70; Coal Creek Ch., 
$10.25 419 18 

Indiana 

Elkhart City Church, $45; Union Church, 
$43; Oak Grove Cong., $86.50; Young Peo- 
ples' Class, Maple Grove S. S., $5; Mexico 
Cong., $10; S. S. Class of Wakarusa, $20; 
Union Grove Church, Mississinewa Cong., 

$130; Maple Grove Cong., $13 352 50 

Iowa 

S. S. Boys, Dysart, $2.60; Coon River 
Cong., by Bagley House, $127.62; Grundy 
County Church, $12; Monroe Co. Cong., $24, 166 22 
Kansas 

A Sister, McPherson, $5; East Wichita 
Church, $14.50; Chapman Creek Church, N. 

E. Dist. Kans., $94, 113 50 

Michigan 

Mrs. H. C. Lowder, Nashville, 3 00 

Minnesota 

Monticello Church, $17; Barbara Nickey, 
India, $100; Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Grossnickle, 

Buffalo Lake, $25, 142 00 

Missouri 

A Sister, Montrose, 5 00 

Montana 

Florendale S. S., Paxton, 5 25 

Nebraska 

Susan Roelof sz, Lincoln, 10 00 

New York 

Christian Endeavor Class, Brooklyn, .... 10 00 

Ohio 

Donnels Creek Cong., $17; Lower Stillwa- 
ter Church, $36.19; Trotwood Church, $476.15; 
Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Buchwalter, Weilers- 
ville, $5; Helpers' and Young Mens' Class, 
Weilersville, $5; Sugar Hill Cong., $68.75; 
Middle District of So. Ohio, $9; Jordan S. 
S., Ft. Recovery, $5, 622 09 

Pennsylvania 

Johnstown Cong., $129.25; Gleaners' Class, 
Akron S. S., $15; Tulpehocken Church, 
$207.91; Fredericksburg Church, $104.45; 
Hatfield Church, $80.79; Riddlesburg Ch., 
$10; Bellwood Church, $45; Scalp Level 
Cong., $48.50; Fairview Church, Middle Dis- 
trict, Pa., $7; Waynesboro Church, of An- 
tietam Cong., $500; Meyersdale Church, $27, 1,174 90 
Virginia 

Mrs. J. W. Shafer, Troutville, 5 00 

Texas 

A Sister, San Antonio 5 00 

Washington 

East Wenatchee S. S. and Individuals, 
$521.50; Wenatchee Cong., $30; Sherman 
Stookey and wife, Olympia, $10, 561 50 

Total for month of November, $ 4,303 37 

FRENCH ORPHANS' RELIEF FUND FOR 
NOVEMBER 

California 

Private Walter M. Moore, Ft. McArthur, 1 00 

Minnesota 

Loyal Class of Nemadji, 9 00 

Virginia 

Elementary Dept. of Summit and Glade 
Sunday-schools, 36 50 

Total for month of November, $ 46 50 

BELGIAN RELIEF FUND FOR NOVEMBER 

California 

Private Walter M. Moore, Ft. McArthur, 1 00 

Virginia 

Elementary Dept. of Summit and Glade 
Sunday-schools 26 91 



Total for month of November $ 



27 91 



YOUR OPPORTUNITY 



To take a trip through our China Mission Fields — by securing 

China— A Challenge to the Church 

Ready to mail January 1, 1920 

Edited by Isaiah E. Oberholtzer, Norman A. Seese, Walter J. Heisey 

Latest and most complete information from our China Mission 

Full of facts and pictures which the church — the base of supply 
for funds — will want to know and see. 115 pages covering 14 distinct 
phases of the work. Sent postpaid, 50c. 



Also make a similar trip through Our India Mission by reading 

A Year with Our Missionaries 

in India 

The Annual India Report concealed in Story Form 

Written by W. B. Stover, Pioneer Missionary to India 

William Weston and his good wife Mary take a trip from Penn- 
sylvania to visit the India Mission. What they see at the different 
stations causes them to marvel at the progress of the work and in- 
cidentally they give us the facts for the > ear's work. The story car- 
ries the interest throughout. Sent postpaid; 15c. 



COMBINATION OFFER NO. i 

China — A Challenge to the Church, $ .50 

A Year With Our Missionaries in India, 15 

Map of Our India Mission (paper), 15 

Missionary Programs, 35 



1 



Total, $1.15 

These four items will be sent postpaid upon receipt of $1.00 

Note: If cloth map of India is desired add 25c more to the order 

Address these orders to 

GENERAL MISSION BOARD, Elgin, 111. 



.i!llllll!llllllllll!l!lll!lllllllllllllll!!lllillllli 






Away Trouble 



A Personal Message to Our Readers: 

These are days of High Prices in everything, and, although 
everyone hopes that they will come down, there seems little evi- 
dence of it. While prices are high, wages are good, farm products 
are a favorable price, and land is higher than ever known before. 
Many of our readers are marketing splendid flocks, and much grain. 
Many have accumulated large bank accounts through the prosper- 
ity of the last few years ; a good many of you are selling farms. 

Now Where Shall 

Your Money Be Invested ? 

This Is the Question 

Why not exchange your Bank Accounts and your Farms for the 
Annuity Bonds of the General Mission Board? 

Consider Well the Following Eight Points About Oar Bonds: 



They are Absolutely safe. Our as- 
sets put us in the Trust Company 
Class. 

They are easily secured. The 
method is simple. We do the work 
and no lawyer is required. 

You have neither worry, trouble nor 
concern. Your income is fixed and you 
can tell for years ahead just how 
much you will get and the day it will 



The interest rate is as large as can 
be expected, commensurate with the 
earning power of money. 



With these bonds you can provide a 
permanent income for dependent rela- 
tives. Many times money left for 
these is squandered or falls prey to 
the unscrupulous. 

The money is safe because it is in- 
vested in first mortgages on farm 
lands. 

You become your own executor. No 
share of your estate goes to lawyers 
or those who have not helped you to 
earn it. 

Your money goes to the work of the 
Lord after it has served you faithfully 
and well. It helps to extend His King- 
dom to the ends of the earth. 



Every dollar of our assets is back of these annuity bonds. Why 
worry further? Write us for full information 

GENERAL MISSION BOARD OF THE CHURCH OF THE 
BRETHREN, Elgin, Illinois 



THE MISSIONARY 




Church of the 'Brethren 



5IZZ 



February 




Seven Thousand Picked American Students at the Student Volunteer Convention, Des Moines, Iowa, 
Facing the World as a Great Missionary Opportunity 



VOL. XXII 



mmmmmmmmmmmmm 

1920 NO. 2 



■lllllllllllllllllllllllliiiiiiiiiiiiii [linn imriiiiiiiiiini iiiiiiiiiiiiiiillllllllllllllllllllllll 



r~™ 



The Missionary Visitor 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN 
THROUGH HER GENERAL MISSION BOARD 



Subscription Terms 



THE SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IS FIFTY CENTS PER YEAR 

The subscription price is included in EACH donation of a dollar or more to the Gen- 
eral Mission Board, either direct or through any congregational collection, provided the 
dollar or more is given by one individual and in no way combined with another's gift. 
Different members of the same family may each give a dollar or more, and extra sub- 
scriptions, thus secured, may upon request be sent to persons who they know will be in- 
terested in reading the Visitor. 

Kindly notice, however, that these subscription terms do not include a subscription for 
every dollar donation, but a subscription for each donation of one dollar or more, no matter 
how large the donation. 

Ministers. In consideration of their services to the church, influence in assisting the 
Committee to raise missionary money, and upon their request annually, the Visitor will 
be sent to ministers of the Church of the Brethren. 

Foreign postage, 15 cents additional to all foreign countries, including Canada. Sub- 
scriptions discontinued at expiration of time. 

To insure delivery of paper, prompt notice of change o* address should be given. When 
asking change of address give old address as well as new. Please order paper each year 
if possible under same name as in the previous year. 

Address all communications regarding subscriptions and make remittances payable to 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, ILLINOIS 

Entered as second class matter at the postofEce of Elgin, Illinois. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, Act of 
October 3, 1917, authorized Aug. 20, 1918. 



Contents for February, 1920 

EDITORIALS, 33 

ESSAYS— 

The Student Volunteer Convention, By I. W. Moomaw, 36 

Church of the Brethren Representatives at Des Moines Convention, ... 37 
Leaving Home and Father (Poem), By Fred M. Hollenberg, 56 

MORE WORKERS FOR INDIA— 

D. L. and Anna M. Forney, By C. Ernest Davis, 38 

Andrew G. Butterbaugh, By Merlin G. Miller, 40 

Bertha Lehman Butterbaugh, By Nellie Claybaugh, 41 

Frederick M. Hollenberg, By Grace Hollenberg, 42 

Nora Reba Hollenberg, By Anna Beahm, 43 

J. Elmer Wagoner, By Geo. W. Miller, '. 44 

Ellen Heckman Wagoner, By Jennie A. Heckman, 45 

Chalmer George Shull, By J. W. Lear, 46 

Mary Speicher Shull, By Ada Shank Neher, 47 

Arthur S. B. Miller, By John H. Blough, 48 

Jennie Blough Miller, By a Friend, 49 

Benjamin F. Summer, By M. W. Emmert and Franklin Byer, 50 

Verna Mabel Blickenstaff, By D. J. Blickenstaff, 52 

Nettie Pearl Brown, By Neva M. Replogle, 52 

Anna Belle Brumbaugh, By Virginia Bixler, 53 

WHY WE GO TO INDIA— 

Personal Statements, 54 

OUR CHOICEST GIFTS WE BRING— 

Statements of Parents, 55 

FINANCIAL REPORT, 57 








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Volume XXII 



FEBRUARY, 1920 



No. 2 



EDITORIALS 



Abraham "wavered not through unbelief, 
but waxed strong through faith, giving 
glory to God, and being fully assured that 
what he had promised, he was able also to 
perform" (Rom. 4: 20-21). 

"Jesus saith unto her, Said I not unto 
thee, that, if thou believedst, thou shouldest 
see the glory of God" (John 11: 40)? 

"Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that 
believeth on me, the works that I do shall 
he do also ; and greater works than these 
shall he do ; because I go unto the Father " 
(John 14: 12). 

Meditation 

"What then is faith? Faith is reason- 
able dealings with reasonable things. Faith 
is in the region of religion what experiment 
is in the region of science. Faith is the 
reasonable experiment with the hypotheses 
of Jesus. It is to take the hypotheses, the 
assumptions, the maxims, the teachings, the 
revelations of Jesus, and experiment upon 
them open-eyed. But all the hypotheses of 
Jesus concern himself. If, therefore, I am 
to experiment with his hypotheses, I have 
to experiment with him; and therefore ex- 
perimental faith becomes trust. It becomes 
committal. It is exploration by consecra- 
tion. It is discovery by homage. It is los- 
ing your life in a great venture that you 
may find it again in a sublime discovery. 

" But there is a tremendous difference be- 
tween faith and belief. Belief is the ac- 
ceptance of a map; faith is the taking of a 
voyage. Belief is perfectly convinced that 
the bridge is sound; faith goes across. . . . 
Therefore, in all faith there is always an 
element of the will at the bottom of it, and 
behind it, and back of it. . . . Faith is belief 
ventured upon. ... As the apostle says in 
the Epistle to the Hebrews, 'Faith is the 
test of the things not seen.' That is faith." 
—J. H. Jowett. 

The above scriptures and meditation 
were presented to those in attendance at 



the Des Moines International Student Con- 
vention as the morning thought for one of 
the quiet periods with the Master. 

It was the most wonderful privilege of 
nearly one hundred representatives from 
the colleges of the Church of the Brethren, 
and others, to attend the International 
Student Volunteer Convention at Des 
Moines, Iowa, Dec. 31 to Jan. 4. The privi- 
lege can be understood but slightly when 
we are informed that more than seven 
thousand students and faculty representa- 
tives from nearly one thousand institutions 
of the United States and Canada were 
present, as well as many from foreign 
lands who are in attendance at North 
American colleges. 



The purpose of these meetings, which are 
held regularly every four years, is to pre- 
sent to the students of that college gener- 
ation the vision of the world's spiritual 
needs and to fire them with a willingness 
and desire to serve. 



The leaders and speakers of the confer- 
ence were some of the foremost Christian 
men of America, while many missionaries 
and foreign Christian leaders found place 
on the general or sectional programs. The 
fires kindled by these men touched many 
hearts, and these representatives from the 
colleges in turn will carry the enthusiasm 
back to their constituencies. 

We were eager to catch the spirit of the 
convention, and we had not long to wait. 
The opening address by Dr. John R. Mott, 
chairman of the Conference, revealed it. 
Yea, more than revealed it; he made it to 
stand forth alive. His note was optimistic, 
but immediately we were told of the great 
task ahead. "We have assembled in the 
morning of the New World to catch a new 
vision and receive a new challenge," said 



34 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1920 



Mr. Mott. And further, "God wants us to 
master and interpret the new day in a way 
to mofe and direct the world." 



Who could be disheartened with the fu- 
ture if he were willing to feel as does Dr. 
Mott? "I would rather live in the next 
ten years than in any other like period of 
which I have read or can dream." And lis- 
ten to his reason for this: "All pillars of 
civilization have crumbled save Jesus 
Christ." We commend these words for 
serious thought to anyone who is trying to 
make his prewar measure of service and 
sacrifice and habits of life fit into the new 
period, and likewise to the pessimist, who 
sees nothing ahead but the debris of de- 
cayed and fallen ideals and theories. 

Never did the conference seek to mini- 
mize the obstacles and dangers that con- 
front us ; never did it underrate the damage 
which the war has done to our civilization, 
but always was emphasized the colossal 
proportions of the task ahead and the de- 
mands upon us for superhuman strength. 
Always we were pointed to Jesus Christ as 
the Source of sufficient strength for every 
task. 



He who is a pessimist these days must 
surely do his Jesus an injustice in failing 
to recognize in him the great hope and as- 
surance of help wherever needed, and in 
proper measure of power to accomplish all 
things whatsoever are brought forward as 
a challenge to his children. 



We can not presume to go further in 
these editorial columns in reporting the 
conference than this. "We would see Je- 
sus," said the Greeks, coming in quest of 
him, and we can see him now in all-suf- 
ficiency if we but will. Let the Church of 
the Brethren lay hold on him in belief and 
faith and we shall be able to accomplish 
such a work as we know not. 



Bro. M. R. Zigler, Broadway, Va., has 
been elected home mission secretary, with 
the General Mission Board, and is now lo- 
cated at Elgin and busy with his tasks. 
Bro. Zigler will endeavor to assist District 



Boards with their problems ; his office will 
be intended for a " clearing house " for 
problems, suggestions, and new ideas rela- 
tive to work on the home base; and he is 
eager to foster the interests of every local 
church. This is the first time that our 
church has had a home secretary, but the 
time is more than ripe for a careful culti- 
vation of our missionary interests in Amer- 
ica. ^ ^ 

Credit given to the Fairfax congregation, 
Virginia, in the December Visitor, for the 
support of Bro. Minor Myers, should have 
gone to Minor's five brothers, who stand 
back of him in this venture of faith; like- 
wise, it is the congregations of Middle 
Pennsylvania, rather than the Sunday- 
schools, that support Sister Sara Replogle. 



In January, 1919, the students and facul- 
ties of our colleges, moved with a spirit to 
do something for India, decided to raise 
$5,000 for " an institution of learning in In- 
dia, the nature and scope of which to be 
determined by the India Field Committee." 
The schools raised considerably more than 
the sum above stated, and the India Mis- 
sion decided that this sum should be used 
for the erection of the first building of the 
Normal School, located at Bulsar. The 
school has not been erected, but plans are 
now under way for it, and doubtless this 
will be done in 1920. The Board has much 
appreciated this deep interest on the part 
of the students and faculties of 1918-1919, 
and is pleased to make this announcement. 
The building to be erected will stand as a 
monument to their sympathy for the rising 
church in India. 



Likewise it is a joy to know that the 
students of our schools for this year are 
bending their energies, during February, to 
raise a large fund for the equipment of the 
Ping Ting Hospital, China. If our church 
as a whole were as interested in missions 
and as self-sacrificing as her students and 
college faculties, the total of her gifts for 
missions would be greatly increased. 



We wonder sometimes how our ministe- 
rial and pastoral question will be removed 
from one of our ever-present problems. 



February 

1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



35 



We have plenty of ministers but too few 
pastors ; we are blessed with preacher- 
financiers ; we are poverty stricken in full- 
time servants of the cross. The greatest 
missionary task before us is to popularize 
the pastorate. We verily believe that one 
of the greatest crises of our church life 
stares us in the face at this corner of the 
street. Shall our ministry be found suf- 
ficient in the test? 



Danger ahead, brethren, if we stop in 
these after-the-war moments and spend our 



energies in battles over some of those most 
distracting things that have kept us small 
in days gone by. Agitation against a thing 
always brings upon us a double baptism of 
that which we do not want. The world is 
so big, the tasks are so great, the dangers 
are so imminent, the challenge is so divine 
that for us now to begin to spend our ener- 
gies on things that draw lines and divide us 
is for us to write our own decree of life in 
" the narrow vale." Steady now, steady, in 
the movement towards turning the search- 
light upon each other. 



THE JOB THE STUDENT VOLUNTEERS HAVE MET TO CONSIDER 




A Significant Cartoon Clipped from a Des Moines Newspaper at the Time of the Convention 



36 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1920 



The Student Volunteer Convention 

I. W. Moomaw 



THE eighth international convention 
of the Student Volunteer Movement, 
was held at Des Moines, Iowa, Dec. 
31 to Jan. 4. The movement had its be- 
ginning at Mount Hermon, Mass., in 1886, 
and has completed the first generation of 
its life. The movement is international 
and interdenominational. It is not an or- 
ganization to send out missionaries, but it 
is an unswervingly loyal auxiliary of the 
church. It had its origin primarily in the 
student Y. M. C. A. and student Y. W. C. 
A., but today it exists chiefly to serve the 
foreign mission boards of North America. 
The purpose of the Student Volunteer 
Movement is fourfold: (1) To awaken and 
cherish among all students of North Amer- 
ica an active interest in foreign missions; 
(2) to enroll an adequate number of con- 
secrated young men and women to meet 
the increasing demands of the various mis- 
sion boards; (3) to intensify the mission- 
ary strength of the colleges and home 
churches; (4) to lay an equal burden upon 
all young men and women at home, that 
they too may feel their responsibility of 
giving all men everywhere an opportunity 
to know the living Christ. The movement 
assumes that if the message of Christ is to 
be taken to every part of the world during 
the present generation, it is imperative that 
all Christian students work with one mind 
and one heart toward that end. It unites 
them in their purpose with a remarkable 
solidarity. 

Like any constructive organization, the 
Volunteer Movement had a small begin- 
ning. This is seen when we compare the 
Mount Hermon convention, with its sev- 
enty-six delegates, to the recent Des 
Moines convention, where the attendance 
reached over 8,000. The movement repre- 
sents a constituency of 300,000 students, 
enrolled in 1,000 different schools and col- 
leges. The progress of the movement may 
best be measured by its 8,000 members al- 
ready at work in twenty-two different non- 
Christian lands. 

At the recent convention Dr. John R. 
Mott was chairman. He was assisted by 
Robert P. Wilder, the father of the Volun- 



teer Movement. Other speakers were G. 
Sherwood Eddy, Robert Speer, Samuel 
Higginbottom, and Dr. Zwemer of Egypt. 
To these may be added a large number of 
returned missionaries and foreign students. 
One impressive feature of the program was 
the group of 500 returned missionaries, 
seated on the stage, and the strong appeal 
that " these gray-haired, tired veterans shall 
not go back alone." 

The claims of Christ upon the young 
people of this generation were forcefully 
presented. The three touchstones of the 
entire convention were service, sacrifice 
and this generation. 

A plastic, overwrought, tired, humbled, 
teachable and expectant world was thrown 
wide open before the students present. Al- 
most every moment they heard the chal- 
lenge of a world-embracing task, " white 
unto harvest." One singular feature of the 
convention was the silent reverence at all 
sessions. It was a very common practice 
to continue a session past the closing hour 
and then spend from twenty to thirty min- 
utes in prayer. During this time the vast 
audience remained perfectly quiet. 

Some Convention Flashes 

" The world is plastic today and there is 
no time to thresh old straw." 

V It is an idle dream to speak of world 
evangelization unless the people of Amer- 
ica find unity in Christ, our Lord." 

" Take God in his reality and see what 
he can do for you." 

" God must love the common people, be- 
cause he made so many of them." 

" Today Christianity must answer the 
question as to whether there shall be an- 
other world war." 

" Men are builders of nations. Women 
build the homes on which nations stand." 

"What is the daily output of your life?" 

" Religion should not only save a man's 
soul; it should serve humanity." 

" Making a life is the supreme earthly 
vocation." 

" Great doers have always been great be- 
lievers." 

" Ours is an expectant world. The most 



February 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



37 



backward and depressed men have their 
faces set toward the new day of hope." 

Among the many exhibits in the audi- 
torium was one small corner in which were 
displayed the plans for our Five-Year For- 
ward Movement. In the main building our 
Mission Board was represented by Secre- 
tary J. H. B. Williams. He was there to 
assist any young people who needed help 
in planning their life work. 

Saturday afternoon all the delegates 
from the Church of the Brethren met for 
a sectional conference in the Des Moines 
church. All of our colleges were repre- 
sented by ninety-five young men and wom- 



en. In addition to these were all the re- 
turned missionaries and those under ap- 
pointment; also several members of the 
General Mission Board. An inspiring pro- 
gram was held, in which the relation of the 
church to the present world situation was 
considered. Later in the evening the kind 
people of the Des Moines church showed 
their hospitality by serving a splendid sup- 
per to all who were present. 

Certainly such a convention causes the 
task of world evangelization to throb with 
a new hope. Its fruitfulness will continue 
throughout the coming years. 

Xo. Manchester, Ind. 



Church of the Brethren Representatives at the 
Des Moines Student Volunteer Convention 



Student Volunteer Organization. — Presi- 
dent, F. B. Statler; Vice-President, Ira 
Moomaw; Secretary, Ruth Forney; Editor- 
ial Secretary, Miles Blickenstaff ; Traveling 
Secretary, A. D. Helser. 

Outgoing Missionaries. — Ben Summer, 
Andrew G. Butterbaugh and wife, D. L. 
Forney and wife, Chalmer Shull and wife. 

Missionaries on Furlough. — Anna Eby, 
Olive Widdowson, J. I. Kaylor, J. B. Em- 
mert, J. M. Blough, Anna Blough. 

General Mission Board. — J. J. Yoder, A. 
P. Blough, J. H. B. Williams, General Sec- 
retary; H. Spenser Minnich, Educational 
Secretary; M. R. Zigler, Home Secretary. 

Editor Gospel Messenger. — Edward 
Frantz, Editor. 

COLLEGE DELEGATIONS 

Bridgewater.— Dr. J. S. Flory, E. S. Kira- 
cofe, John Roller. 

Juniata. — Foster B. Statler, Marie Kim- 
mel, Linwood Geiger, Galen B. Rover. 

McPherson.— Prof. J. J. Yoder, Prof. 
Chas. Morris. Miles Blickenstaff, Howard 
Engle, Ada Beckner, Miss Burkholder, 
Paul Brandt, Oliver Trapp. 

Blue Ridge. — Prof. J. J. John, Norman 
Wilson, Ruth Beahm. 

Mt. Morris. — Prof. A. J. Brumbaugh, Pas- 
tor F. E. McCune, Bennet Stutzman, Lola 
Buck. 

Elizabethtown. — Prof. J. G. Myer, Ezra 
Wenger, A. C. Baugher. 



Nurses' Home, Omaha, Nebr. — L e 1 a 
Moyer. 

Southwest Teachers' College.— Howard 
W. Oxley. 

Daleville. — Prof. Ira Thomas, Ada Cart- 
er, Stover Bowman. 

La Verne.— Prof. S. J. Miller, I. V. Fund- 
erburgh, C. E. Davis, L. E. Brubaker. 

Crozer Theological Seminary. — P a u 1 
Garber, G. X. Hartman, W. K. McKee. 

Pennsylvania University Medical. — Ruth 
Royer. 

Hebron Seminary.— Mabel Harley, C. H. 
Hinegardner, Densie Hollinger. 

North Manchester.— Prof. R. C. Wenger, 
Arthur Mote and wife, Ira Moomaw, Wm. 
Beahm, Moy Gwong. 

Northwestern University Medical. — Carl 
Coffman, H. L. Burk. 

Wisconsin University Medical. — Pearl 
Grosh. 
"Ames, Iowa. — M. D. Helser. 

Bethany Bible School. — Elgin Moyer, La- 
vina Roop, Jane Shamberger, Anna Beahm, 
Agnes Kessler, John Graham, Ruth Bloch- 
er, John Blough, John Barwick, Celesta 
Wine, Russel Shull, Merlin Shull, Minerva 
Xeher, Catherine McCormick, Norman 
Bauman, Lutie Sargent, Burton Metzler, 
May Hersch, Orville Hersch, Clarence 
Gnagy, Albert Smith, Ray Zook, Elizabeth 
Ludy, Ruth Forney, A. D. Helser, Edith 
Weybright, Perry Rohrer, Ferdie Rohrer, 
Drue Funderberg. 



38 



The Missionary Visitor 

More Workers for India 

D. L. and Anna M. Forney 

C. Ernest Davis 



February 
1920 



RO. D. L. FORNEY, second son of 
Edmund and Elizabeth Forney, was 
born in Ogle County, 111., Oct. 1, 



B 

1865. 

He attended and afterwards taught coun- 
try school. For five consecutive years he 
was a student at Mt. Morris College. 

Three years, from 1894 to 1897, were 
spent as a missionary in Arkansas. 

Jan. 1, 1896, he was married to Anna M. 
Shull. 

Anna M. Shull, daughter of George and 
Elizabeth Brubaker Shull, was born in Ma- 
coupin County, 111., Jan. 9,' 1871. The fa- 
ther died when Anna was five years old, 
and ten years later the mother passed away. 
The children found homes with relatives. 

Anna attended the Pleasant Hill School 
near Virden, 111., for a number of years, 
and then spent several years in Mt. Morris 
College. Later she taught school near Ore- 
gon, 111. Then she went to Manchester 
College for a part of a year before her mar- 
riage. 

Brother and Sister Forney went to India 
in 1897 and remained until 1904, when it 
was necessary for them to return on ac- 
count of Sister Forney's health. Since that 
time, although they have been very busy in 
the homeland, their hearts have been in In- 
dia. 

Jan. 19, 1906, they located at Reedley, 
Calif. A few months previously a church 
had been organized at the Hill Valley 
Schoolhouse, about fifteen miles away, but 
no regular services had ever been held by 
our people in Reedley. Immediately Sun- 
day-school and preaching were started and 
they have been continued until the present 
time. Soon other families of Brethren 
moved into Reedley and other parts of the 
great San Joaquin Valley. The Forneys 
generously threw open their home to the 
newcomers, and at times the baggage on 
their front veranda indicated that as many 
as three families were being cared for. 

The church not only grew by immigra- 
tion but by baptisms, and in about five 



years the membership had increased from 
about fifteen to 150. 

Along with the work of the church they 
cared for several acres of peach orchard. 
More than once dried peaches from Reed- 
ley graced the tables of missionary friends 
in India. 

During the ten years' residence at Reed- 
ley, four of their five daughters gave their 
hearts to the Lord, causing their parents to 
rejoice. 

These busy years were filled with the 
work and joys of the Christian ministry. 
Also in the midst of the pleasures and joys 
some of the trying experiences hi life came 
to them. 

Bro. Forney took an active part in the 
organization and work of the Northern Dis- 
trict of California. He was the first mis- 
sionary secretary of the District and served 
continuously in that office until 1^18, when 
he moved from the District. For two years 
of that time he was also the District Sun- 
day-school and C. W. Secretary. His work 
as missionary secretary was especially help- 
ful. He gave addresses, told of experiences 
on the India field, advocated mission study, 
and enlisted volunteers. He also served on 
the Old People's Home Board and on va- 
rious committees that required much time 
and considerable travel over the extensive 
territory of Northern California. 

Sister Forney also has taken an active 
part in the work of the District, having at- 
tended all but one of the District Meetings 
held during her residence in the District. 
She served for several years as a District 
officer of the Sisters' Aid Society. She has 
conducted mission study classes and taught 
in all departments of the Sunday-school. 

A two years' pastorate at Chico closed 
their labors in Northern California. They 
then came to La Verne, Calif., so as to give 
their daughters the advantage of attending 
La Verne College. Bro. Forney has spent 
the year as pastor of the Pomona church. 

Five daughters have come to bless their 
home. Two, Catharine and Grace, were 



February 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



39 



born in India. Lucile, aged 10, will ac- 
company her parents to India. The other 
four, ranging from 15 to 23 years of age, 
will remain in the homeland. Lois, Grace, 
and Catharine will continue their work in 
La Verne College, while Ruth, the eldest, 
will carry forward her preparation for life's 
work in Bethany Bible School. She and 
one other are definitely preparing for the 
mission field. 

Bro. Forney's parents, Edmund and Eliz- 
abeth Forney, are past 80 years of age and 
live in La Verne. 

Brother and Sister Forney say that the 
needs of India and the petition of the work- 
ers on the field for their return have been 
among the chief factors in bringing about 
their return to the work which they were 
compelled to give up fifteen years ago. 

La Verne, Calif. 



ANNA CASSEL 



Many of our readers will remember Anna 
Cassel as one of our worthy workers ap- 
pointed to India. We 
are indeed sorry that 
her health does not 
at this time permit 
her to proceed to her 
chosen work. The 
following is a portion 
of a letter just re- 
ceived from her: 
" My heart is with 
all of the mission- 
aries as it was with 
Sisters Kintner and 
Replogle. God only knows how I wanted 
to be with them. Since our all-wise Fa- 
ther has planned otherwise, it must be best 
and so I am content." 





Anna M. Forney 



Lucile 



D. L. Forney 



The Three Who Take Up Their Field of Labor in India 




Lois Ruth Grace Catharine 

The Four Who Remain in America and Bid Their Parents Godspeed in Their New Tasks 



40 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1920 



Andrew G. Butterbaugh 

Merlin G. Miller 




THE childhood of Andrew G. Butter- 
baugh was blessed with those 
wholesome influences which have 
played so large a part in the lives of most 
of the missionaries 
of the Church of the 
Brethren — godly par- 
ents, sacred associa- 
tions in a staid and 
quiet country church, 
and the glorious free- 
dom of the farm. 

Andrew was born 
near Polo, 111., Dec. 
10, 1891. His entire 
childhood and youth 
were spent on the 
same farm on which his four brothers and 
three sisters were reared. When Andrew 
was only nine years old his father, Daniel 
Butterbaugh, died, so that the Christian 
training of the family fell largely to the 
sainted mother, Margaret. 

Early in his childhood Andrew manifest- 
ed a very eager interest in all sorts of con- 
struction — an interest which in later years 
took the turn of carpentry and furniture 
making. In childhood he most delighted 
in pounding nails in the old bootjack, in 
building all sorts of block-houses, or in 
working on some toy invention. 

When he was twelve Andrew united with 
the church. The thought that most influ- 
enced him to take this step was the story 
of Jesus at the age of twelve in the temple. 
To Andrew it seemed that to unite with 
the church at this age was to follow in the 
steps of his Master. This thought was 
more than a passing idea, for it remained 
with him during the years that followed. 
Indeed, the thought of following in the 
footsteps of Jesus became even more in- 
fluential in his secret meditations in the 
years that ensued, when Andrew became a 
carpenter as Jesus had been. 

Andrew's education began in the country 
school, and was continued at Mt. Morris 
College, first in the academy and later in 
the college proper. While in his third year 
in the academy he joined the Volunteer 
Band. It was by no means settled yet that 



he should become a foreign missionary, but 
the influences that had been silently and 
secretly at work in Andrew's heart had 
brought him to the place that he desired 
to spend his life in some sort of Christian 
work. Among the earliest of these influ- 
ences was Bro. Stover's book, " India, a 
Problem." So also the addresses of Bro. 
Stover himself, when home on his first fur- 
lough, left a very vivid impression upon 
Andrew, who at that time was a mere boy. 
Later, Bro. D. L. Miller's stereopticon lec- 
tures, illustrating our mission work in In- 
dia, particularly kept this missionary influ- 
ence alive in Andrew's life. It was, how- 
ever, at the Winona Conference of 1913, 
which was the first Annual Meeting that 
Bro. Butterbaugh attended, that these im- 
pressions led to a decision for the foreign 
mission field. . 

Bro. Butterbaugh was elected to the min- 
istry by his home church, the West Branch 
congregation, shortly after he had joined 
the Volunteer Band, when he was twenty- 
two years of age. The call to the ministry 
served to strengthen the secret tendencies 
which had for so long been leading him to- 
ward the mission field. 

June 2, 1915, Bro. Butterbaugh was united 
in marriage with Sister Bertha Belle Leh- 
man, of Franklin Grove, 111. This was the 
happy culmination of a courtship begun 
several years before at Mt. Morris College. 
From the first, Bro. Butterbaugh and Sis- 
ter Lehman were strongly attracted to each 
other, but it can truthfully be said that their 
affection grew all the deeper and richer as 
they became more and more settled in their 
desire to devote themselves to the work of 
the church. 

The two years following their marriage, 
Brother and Sister Butterbaugh spent at 
Bethany Bible School, in definite prepara- 
tion for their anticipated service on the 
mission field. The next two years were 
spent back at Mt. Morris, from which in- 
stitution Bro. Butterbaugh received his col- 
lege degree in the spring of 1919. During 
these happy years of married life which 
Brother and Sister Butterbaugh have spent 
together, three children have come into 



February 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



41 



their home to bless it, the eldest a boy, 
Beryl, and the two younger, girls, Vila and 
lone. Those who know them will always 
remember them as an ideally happy fam- 
ily, where contentment and kindness reign 
supreme. 

When, last spring, the cablegram came 
from India, "Send eight men," Brother 
and Sister Butterbaugh were among the 
first to respond, al- 
though it had been 
their hope to remain 
in this country a few 
years longer in order 
to receive further 
preparation for their 
contemplated service. 
During the past sum- 




Beryl Delos Vila Larene Bertha lone 

The Butterbaugh Juniors 



mer Bro. Butterbaugh was engaged in 
carpenter work. The few months prior 
to sailing were spent at Bethany Bible 
School, and in doing some special work 
in architecture, at the Chicago Technical 
College. Bro. Butterbaugh goes to India 
to give special attention to the work of 
erecting missionary buildings and teach- 
ing our native Christian Boys the art 
of carpentry and fur- 
niture making. His is 
the happy privilege of 
giving himself to the 
service of the Lord in 
a special work, which 
also allows him to fol- 
low the natural bent 
of his own talent. 



Bertha Lehman Butterbaugh 

Nellie Claybaugh 



AFTER a season of eager anticipation, 
June 18, 1893, Ira and Mary Lehman 
welcomed into their home at Frank- 
lin Grove, 111., their first-born child, Ber- 
tha Belle. She was 
well born, having be- 
hind her a God-fear- 
ing, a God-loving and 
a God-serving ances- 
try, among whom 
spiritual interests 
were first. Bertha re- 
ceived her early train- 
ing by example rath- 
er than precept. Sis- 
ter Lehman is a wom- 
an of few words, but 
her calm self-posses- 
sion and her unfailing cheerfulness, cou- 
pled with her quiet, devoted spirituality, 
make of her a rare mother; one to whom 
her children can well look up, and whom 
they can admire and respect. 

In a home of healthy Christian atmos- 
phere Bertha received profound and last- 
ing religious impressions. As is normal in 
childhood, she responded readily to such 
influences, and at the age of twelve she af- 
filiated with the church. As a child Bertha 
was accustomed to hear the interests of 
the church at home and abroad prayerfully 
discussed; she also heard returned mission- 




aries in her home church. Through these 
combined influences the seed of mission- 
ary ambition was implanted early. 

Bertha attended the country school and 
town high school for two years. Then a 
year at Mt. Morris College was followed 
by a year spent quietly at home. During 
the spring Bertha paid Bethany Bible 
School a week's visit. No sooner was she 
in the spiritual atmosphere of the school 
than there was stirred within her a hunger 
for higher ideals and deeper spiritual ex- 
periences. She at once planned to be one 
of the student body for the next year. Now 
thrown into constant association with 
those having " Saved to Serve " as their 
watchword, the seed of missionary ambi- 
tion of childhood days germinated and be- 
came a living force, evidencing its presence 
in Bertha's becoming a foreign volunteer. 
Bertha was not of the sentimental, " goody- 
goody " type. In fact, r. good time made 
such a strong appeal that had you known 
her only in her youthful pranks you might 
not have suspected the hidden depths. Up- 
on making a definite decision for her future 
service she had the needed ballasting to 
steady her. Preparation now became her 
aim, and she returned to Mt. Morris to fin- 
ish her academy course. 

The week following commencement, June 
2, 1915, she was united in marriage with 



42 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1920 



Andrew Butterbaugh, a classmate. Their 
new home was started at Bethany, in ac- 
cordance with their common aim of for- 
eign service. Into this happy home, con- 
sisting of two small rooms, but sacred be- 
cause of the holy purposes upon which it 
had been founded, on April 3 Beryl Delos 
received a hearty welcome. In the autumn 
Bertha again took up Bible study, and in 
addition a short course in practical nursing. 
She also contributed much in interest and 
inspiration to the weekly mothers' meet- 
ings. The fall of 1917 found them again 
at Mt. Morris, Andrew enrolled in the col- 
lege department and Bertha, on Oct. 6, 
welcoming Vila Larene with all the love of 
a true mother-heart. Highly prizing her 
motherhood and giving herself unstintingly 
to it, she managed to pursue some college 
subjects the winter and spring semesters. 
The next winter Bertha lone came to fur- 
ther bless their home. Far from being 
burdened with fast-increasing responsibili- 
ties, Bertha's cup of happiness was full to 
o'erflowing. 

Last spring they offered themselves to 
the Mission Board and were appointed to 



the India field. Their sailing being de- 
layed, they seized the opportunity for fur- 
ther preparation and again established their 
home at Bethany, both engaging in Bible 
study. The condition of the home life in 
India calls loudly to Bertha. She senses 
the important part the home is going to 
play in Christianizing India. She longs to 
teach, concretely, the hallowing influence 
of the Gospel of Christ upon family rela- 
tionships. For this task Bertha is very es- 
pecially fitted. As a wife she is a very 
real helpmate; not looking for life to be 
made smooth and easy for her, but joyfully 
sharing their common lot and proving an 
inspiration to her husband day by day. As 
a homemaker she is capable; she has made 
out of two rooms such a home as many 
would look upon with envy. As a mother, 
in these days of such false standards, she 
is glorifying motherhood anew. As a Chris- 
tian she is just a little child, utterly de- 
pendent upon her Father for all things and 
living in the sweet joy of fellowship with 
him. We rejoice in seeing her go forth. 

3435 Van Buren St., Chicago. 



FREDERICK M. HOLLENBERG, the 
fourth child of William and Martha 
Hollenberg, was born in Clay Coun- 
ty, Ind., July 8, 1893. His parents, mem- 
bers of the Church 
of the Brethren, hav- 
ing a deep faith in 
God and a desire to 
raise their children to 
be of use to the 
world, supplied the 
home with a few 
choice books, allow- 
ing nothing else to 
come in. While the 
children were yet 
very small, the mother would gather them 
about her and read to them for hours from 
books which developed character. Always 
the ideal was held before the children that 
nothing but the noblest was worthy of 
their effort. His parents were hard work- 
ing people and gave the spirit of honest 
labor to their children. 




Frederick M. Hollenberg 

Grace Hollenberg 

When Fred was three years old the fam- 
ily moved to North Dakota. Here in this 
frontier environment, his early childhood 
was spent and he learned the lessons which 
come only through toil and hardship. In 
1903 the family moved to Alberta, Canada. 
Living on the frontier, with all its difficul- 
ties to encounter, has left Fred with a de- 
termination undaunted by difficulties, a 
spirit never satisfied unless engaged in 
work. In June, 1906, Fred confessed Christ. 

The family moved to Reedley, Calif., in 
1909, and here in 1910 Fred graduated from 
the grades and began his high school work, 
which was interrupted in January by the 
family returning to Canada. The next win- 
ter he came back to Reedley and finished 
his freshman work. It was while in Reed- 
ley that he decided to spend his life in serv- 
ice in the foreign field, and he has remained 
true to his ideal of service. 

In the fall of 1912 Fred entered the acad- 
emy of La Verne, from which he graduated 
in the spring of 1914. In 1916 he was elected 



February 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



43 



to the ministry, and the following summer 
he preached every Sunday in the old 
schoolhouse in Canada, where he had gone 
to church and school as a child. June, 1917, 
found him a B. A. graduate of La Verne 
College. He then entered McPherson, from 
which he received his M. A. in the spring 
of 1918. After graduating from McPherson 
he entered Bethany. Here he had charge 
of the police station work during the win- 
ter. It was also here that he met and 
learned to love Nora Reber, to whom he 
was married June 1, 1919. At the Winona 
Conference they were among the number 
accepted by the church for service in In- 
dia. Their summer was spent in the inter- 
est of the Forward Movement in Califor- 
nia and in visiting Fred's old home in Can- 
ada. And while waiting to sail for India 



they were at work in the Liberty church, 
Liberty, 111. 

Fred has indeed been a source of inspira- 
tion to his younger brothers and sister. As 
a child he was the leader, and as he grew 
older we learned to depend on his judg- 
ment and decisions. He compromises his 
ideals of right with no one, and though 
he does not make a great show of his re- 
ligion, we believe that it is deep, firm and 
true. 

As Fred goes to the field we wish him 
and his companion Godspeed, believing 
that, with the determination, the deep re- 
ligious conviction, and the initiative which 
both possess, much good will be accom- 
plished through their efforts. 

N. Manchester, Ind. 



Nora Reber Hollenberg 

Anna Beahm 



IT was in 1906. A new girl was coming 
to live near us. Of course we all won- 
dered what she would be like. It was 
not long, however, after Nora came that 
we learned to love 
her. The years have 
added to our appre- 
ciation of her. 

Nora was born on 
a farm near Bern- 
ville, Pa., Oct. 21, 
1892. Here she had 
the usual experiences 
of farm life and early 
school life. When she 
was fourteen years of 
age her parents decided to move to Eliza- 
bethtown, in order that their children 
might have better school privileges. But 
just a short time before they planned to 
leave, the father, after a brief illness, passed 
away, leaving the bereaved mother and 
children to carry out their plans without 
him. The mother bravely did all possible 
for her children. She is the kind of a moth- 
er who, by her quiet influence, inspires and 
encourages to greater service. 

At Elizabcthtown College Nora complet- 
ed the English scientific course in 1911 and 
the pedagogical in 1912. The following 
two years the schoolroom claimed her. In 




the summer of 1914 she came to Bethany 
Bible School, where she spent two years 
in study. In 1917 she completed her col- 
lege course at Mt. Morris College, and the 
following year remained there as assistant 
in the English department of the academy. 
Between times she spent a summer at the 
Columbia College of Expression (1916), 
and one at the University of Chicago 
(1917). 

In February, 1908, Nora gave her life to 
Jesus and was baptized. Throughout her 
Christian life she has had a desire for serv- 
ice. This desire found expression in teach- 
ing in a mission Sunday-school while at 
Elizabethtown and at the Douglas Park 
Mission and the Chinese Sunday-school 
while in Chicago. As her vision of the 
world field became larger there grew in her 
heart a conviction which led her to give her 
life to foreign service. 

Not long after this the pathway of her 
life met and coincided with that of Mr. 
Frederick Hollenberg, to whom she was 
married June 1, 1919. At the last Winona 
Conference they were approved as mission- 
aries to India. 

They go forth with our prayers, that not 
only the message which they bring but the 
impersonated Christ in their lives may bear 
fruit for him. 



44 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1920 



J. Elmer Wagoner 

Geo. W. Miller 




BRO. J. ELMER WAGONER, son of 
Eli S. Wagoner and Lydia F. Wag- 
oner, was born Nov. 26, 1881, near 
Hammond, Moultrie County, 111. He is the 
eldest of a family of 
six children, having 
one brother, two sis- 
ters and two half- 
brothers. His mother 
died when he was 
about eight years of 
age. 

During his younger 
years the family lived 
on a farm, and here 
he learned the mean- 
ing of toil and variety of experience. He 
attended the common schools from 1886 to 
1895, and having a determination to get an 
education, the way opened so that he could 
attend high school from 1897 to 1902, grad- 
uating from the La Place school. He then 
spent three years teaching, being very suc- 
cessful. 

During a series of meetings held at La 
Place in October, 1900, he accepted Christ 
as his Savior. Being always ready and 
willing to do what he could for the good 
of others and for the advancement of the 
church, he was soon serving the church 
and Sunday-school as secretary, superin- 
tendent or assistant superintendent. He 
was in almost continuous- service in this 
particular phase of church work for ten or 
twelve years. He was elected to the dea- 
con's office in 1911, to the ministry in 1912, 
advanced to second degree in 1916, and or- 
dained elder in 1919. 

In 1911 he was married to Ellen Heck- 
man, of Cerro Gordo, 111. Their home has 
been blessed with two daughters, Eliza- 
beth Evelyn, born in 1912, and Emma Jo- 
sephine, born in 1914. 

Shortly after his election to the ministry 
he began to feel the need of greater prep- 
aration, and planned to spend some time 
in school work. 

In September, 1913, with his family, he 
moved to Mt. Morris, 111. They had their 
household goods, one child, $100 in money, 
an income of $100 per year, fair health, and 



a determination to stay until they had car- 
ried out their purpose. 

During the four years' stay at Mt. Mor- 
ris Bro. Wagoner worked in the summer 
to help pay expenses. He did some preach- 
ing, having charge of the Columbia church, 
south of Mt. Morris, during 1914. He re- 
ceived his A. B. degree in the spring of 
1917, and moved with his family to Chicago 
to complete his Bible course in Bethany 
Bible School, where he received his B. D. 
degree in 1919. 

While in Chicago his time was well tak- 
en, as he worked from eight to ten hours 
six days in the week in addition to his 
school duties. He also had charge of the 
police station work for a year and a half 
until he became afflicted with rheumatism. 

After his recovery he spent the summer 
of 1919 as traveling secretary for the Gen- 
eral Mission Board, in the Southern Dis- 
trict of Illinois. 

The Okaw church, where he was con- 
verted and lived the greater part of his 
life, will support him on the field. He feels 
especially grateful to Elders John Arnold, 
S. S. Miller, Andrew Metzger, Eli Wolf 
and others for their inspiration and encour- 
agement in church work. 




Elizabeth Evelyn and Emma Josephine 



February 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



45 



Ellen Heckman Wagoner 




Jennie A. 

SISTER BARBARA ELLEN HECK- 
MAN was born into the home of 
David and Elizabeth Miller Heckman, 
near Hammond, 111., Sept. 23, 1885. She 
was the eighth child 
in a family of ten, 
and the only daugh- 
ter to live to maturi- 
ty. Her girlhood days 
were lived near Cer- 
ro Gordo, where she 
attended the district 
school and later the 
high school in town. 
Surrounded all her 
life by Christian in- 
fluences, at the age of twelve she responded 
to them by personally accepting Christ and 
being baptized into the Oakley Church of 
the Brethren at the hands of her uncle, 
Eld. A. J. Nickey. 

Ellen cannot remember when she was 
not interested in the life and work of the 
church. As a young woman she took an 
active part in the Sunday-school, Chris- 
tian Workers, and Missionary Reading 
Circle in the Cerro Gordo congregation. 
Through the meetings of the last-named 
organization she was given a vision of the 
world's needs, and her desire to be a mis- 
sionary grew in proportion with her intel- 
ligence of the fields. Some practical ex- 
perience was received through one sum- 
mer spent in the mission at Springfield, 111. 
An increasing sense of responsibility 
keenly impressed the need of preparation, 
and a year was spent at Mt. Morris Col- 
lege. Later she entered Bethany Bible 
School, and two years were occupied there 
until health conditions made it imperative 
to discontinue school temporarily. Then 
Ellen joined her parents and brother at 
Rocky Ford, Colo., and for more than a 
year took an active part in the work of the 
congregation at that place. 

Not long after her return to Cerro Gordo 
she was united in marriage with J. Elmer 
Wagoner, March 5, 1911, and for a year 
their home was at La Place, 111. Here the 
same interest in the church was manifested 
and the call came for them to assume the 



Heckman 

work of the ministry. Following the death 
of Mother Heckman, in 1912, the Wagon- 
ers made a home for the lonely father in 
Cerro Gordo until their desires for fuller 
preparation led them to move to Mt. Mor- 
ris in the autumn of 1913. 

Mt. Morris now became their home for 
four years, during which time Bro. Wag- 
oner busied himself with the liberal arts 
course. Sister Wagoner's duties lay large- 
ly in the home, which had been blessed by 
the coming of two daughters, Elizabeth 
Evelyn, born at Cerro Gordo Oct. 27, 1912, 
and Emma Josephine, born at Mt. Morris 
March 6, 1914. As a homemaker Ellen 
constantly encouraged her husband to press 
on in his preparation, even though the years 
were filled with severe financial struggles. 

The next step was to Bethany Bible 
School in the spring of 1917. Here Ellen 
carried as many studies as home duties 
would allow, and took an active part in 
Mothers' Meeting, Sunday-school, and Chi- 
nese mission work. These years, too, in- 
volved some real sacrifices, yet there was 
but one way to go, and that was forward, 
believing that the Lord was leading them. 
From the beginning they were confident 
that there is always a field of service for 
prepared people. In the spring of 1919 they 
were expecting to be used in the schools or 
churches of the homeland. Then came In- 
dia's call for " eight men." The Wagoners 
thought and prayed about it and then left 
it to the Mission Board to make the de- 
cision. The result is that they are on their 
way to India, happy in believing that it is 
the Father's will. 

Sister Wagoner feels convinced that the 
roots of her willingness to go with her lit- 
tle family to foreign shores lie grounded in 
the spiritual soil of the family altar in her 
childhood home. There prayers constantly 
ascended in behalf of needy souls in all the 
world and universal sympathy was fostered 
in all the children. This was largely re- 
sponsible for her brother Frank's willing 
sacrifice in China, and in this same spirit 
our sister is glad to go with her loved ones 
into needy India. 

Oak Park, 111. 



46 



The Missionary Visitor 

Chalmer George Shull 



February 
1920 



\ 



Shull. 




J.W. 

ON the sixth day of August, 1892, on 
a farm in the vicinity of Virden, 111., 
a son was born to, W. H. and Clara 
Nothing out of the ordinary could 
be attached to this 
event, other than that 
this son was the first- 
born and that he had 
the privilege of being 
born into a Christian 
home. 

Chalmer, as he was 
familiarly known, 
soon manifested a 
studious turn of mind 
and took life a bit 
more serious than the average boy does. 
Before he arrived at school age he became 
passionately interested in Bible characters, 
and he would sit and listen with relish to 
the rehearsal or reading from the " Story 
of the Bible," which his parents purchased 
for him and which became a favorite book 
with him. It is needless to add that the 
time thus spent in these formative years 
yielded spiritual fruit in the developing lad. 
On the farm Chalmer learned some val- 
uable lessons in industry and economy, and 
his father very soon appreciated that he 
could be trusted as fully as the measure of 
his maturity. The other children, too— for 
there were ten children that came to bless 
the lives of these godly parents — looked up 
to him as a second father, and he was often 
called "the little old man": little, because 
small of stature, and old, because of his 
ripened judgment. 

" Small of stature " could be said only of 
his body, however, as his mind was de- 
veloped above the average for his age. The 
stock of information, too, was of a splen- 
did selection. Chalmer builded into his 
character gems of the wisest selection from 
the best literary productions accessible, 
Chalmer began his school career in a 
country school southwest of Virden, 111.; 
he graduated from the Virden High School 
in 1910; he taught for two years as the 
principal of the Pleasant Hill school, whose 
curriculum covered two years of high 
school work; he matriculated in Mt. Mor- 



Lear 

ris College in 1912, from which college he 
received his B. A. degree; he spent four 
years at Bethany Bible School where, in 
1919, he received his B. D. degree. One- 
half of the time of his third year at Beth- 
any he served as assistant pastor of the 
Hastings Street Mission, and the fourth 
year he served with credit as the pastor of 
the Douglas Park Mission in Chicago. 

It may be said that the studious nature 
of this young man made it easy for him to 
neglect the due amount of physical exer- 
cise, hence he completed his school work 
with a depleted physical condition. I said 
" completed his school work," but I should 
say in connection with that statement that 
he had planned to spend at least two years 
in post-graduate work in Christian educa- 
tion, and only because of the depleted force 
on the front line in India, the urgent re- 
quest of the secretary of the General Mis- 
sion Board, and the definite leading of the 
Holy Spirit in his plans did he table the 
school purpose and decide to go to the 
field this year. 

Chalmer's religious life was just as in- 
tense as his literary life. There was no 
time in his Christian career that he lacked 
interest in the activities of the church. 
Doubts in the inspiration and authenticity 
of the Bible, so subtle to some young 
minds, were not sufficient to shake his faith. 
He believed that the church represents 
Christ in his program of world evangeliza- 
tion, and that as a member of this Frater- 
nity he was doing his duty only as he ded- 
icated his efforts to a realization of this 
worthy cause. He confessed Christ in the 
West Otter Creek church and was baptized 
in 1908. He was soon elected superintend- 
ent of the Sunday-school and, in 1914, while 
attending school at Mt. Morris, he was 
elected and installed into the ministry. 
Having magnified the office of the ministry 
through the years of service, he was or- 
dained an elder in November, 1919, by the 
Chicago congregation. 

The Bible has God saying, " It is not 
good that man should be alone," and so 
Chalmer, believing that the Father was 
right in the premise, while at Mt. Morris 



February 

1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



47 



decided to make good on this category of 
the Almighty. He found in Mary Speicher, 
of Waterloo, Iowa, a friend who was will- 
ing to join with him and work out the pro- 
gram that each as an individual had cher- 
ished. They were joined in holy matri- 
mony in December, 1917, at the home of 



the bride at Waterloo, and since that time 
they have toiled together in preparation for 
their life work. We prophesy that Chalmer 
and Mary will in the strength of our God 
become valuable helpers in bringing the 
saving message to our dark-skinned neigh- 
bors across the sea. 



Mary Speicher Shull 

Ada Shank Neher 




ON a bright September day (27th) in 
1893, a sweet, blue-eyed baby girl 
came into the home of Brother and 
Sister Jacob Speicher. This little girl, 
Mary, spent her first 
four years in the 
country not far from 
Waterloo, Iowa. 

Bro. Speicher was 
called to the minis- 
try, and in 1897 the 
little family moved 
close to North Man- 
chester College, 
where further prepa- 
tion was made. Four 
happy years were spent at this place. Then 
Bro. Speicher accepted a call to take charge 
of the Orphanage and Old Folks' Home at 
Mexico, Ind. At this place this peaceful 
Christian home was bereft of the father. 

Mrs. Speicher and daughter Mary then 
made their home in Waterloo, and it was 
here that Mary received her elementary 
education. At the age of ten she was re- 
ceived into the church and was ever eager 
to be of some service. 

Mary, being the only child in the fam- 
ily, oftentimes felt lonely, but when she 
was twelve years of age her childhood days 
were brightened by the three children of 
Bro. P. J. Blough, to whom Sister Speicher 
was married in 1906. Mary and her step- 
sister, Jennie (now Mrs. Arthur Miller), 
from that time were the closest of com- 
panions. They were of one age, in the 
same grade at school, and their interests 
were largely the same. Bible stories and 
helpful books- were eagerly read, and in 
these early years both showed interest in 
religious work and were frequently found 
cutting out pictures of missionaries and 
the natives of India. 



The farm near Waterloo was Mary's 
home during her high school and college 
work. At the age of thirteen Mary en- 
tered high school in Waterloo, and while 
there, always being conscientious and en- 
ergetic, she did very creditable work. Her 
social nature and friendly disposition 
readily made for her a wide circle of 
friends. Three years of teaching gave Sis- 
ter Shull valuable experience. 

The school years of 1913-14 and '14-15 
were spent at Mt. Morris in college work. 
While here she volunteered for definite 
service for her Master and was deeply in- 
terested in all religious activities. Bible 
work, expression and music were special 
subjects of interest and have been the 
means of enlarging her fields of usefulness. 

Feeling the need of further Bible study, 
Mary spent three years at Bethany Bible 
School. During the second year of school, 
1917, on Christmas eve, Mary was united 
in marriage to Bro. Chalmer Shull, of 
Girard, 111. 

Brother and Sister Shull have been lo- 
cated in Chicago since that time, and have 
had charge of the Douglas Park Mission 
for the past year. The summer of 1918 
was given to deputation work among the 
churches of Missouri. 

Sister Shull's interest in missions was 
awakened when she was but a child. Bro. 
D. L. Miller's pictures made a lasting im- 
pression on her young mind. Coming in 
contact with some of the missionaries, 
home on furlough, Mary looked to them as 
being ideal, and wondered if some day she 
too might go where they had been. Bible 
study and attendance at missionary meet- 
ings and Volunteer conventions brought to 
her a call which she realized was from 
God, and so she is willing that her life 
shall be spent in his service in India. 



BRIDGEWATER CCLLEGE LIBRARY 
BRIDGEWATER, VIRGINIA 



48 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1920 



tricts. 




Arthur S. 

John H. 

OF the million and one-quarter peo- 
ple on our India mission field, fully 
ninety per cent live in rural dis- 
Their methods of cultivation are 
comparable to those 
in the days of Christ, 
and consequently ev- 
ery unfavorable sea- 
son means hunger 
and starvation. I n 
helping uplift these 
people to a sound 
Christian civilization, 
one can easily-, see 
the necessity of tak- 
ing to them the 
knowledge and methods of modern agricul- 
ture; and that by serving them in this way 
they will be more ready and willing to lis- 
ten to the story of their Savior. In short, 
this is the appeal as it came to one of 
Iowa's young men, Bro. Arthur S. B. 
Miller. * 

Bro. Miller, the youngest son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Simon B. Miller, was born March 10, 
1891, at the country home near Waterloo, 
Iowa. The parents were early settlers 
and well known for their noble efforts and 
ideals in the home and community. Five 
boys and five girls were reared to Chris- 
tian manhood and womanhood, of each of 
whom any home could well be proud. Two 
sisters, Eliza and Sadie, preceded their 
brother to the India field, as they were 
among our earliest missionaries. The 
former is now serving her third term and 
the latter is home on her second furlough. 
Both parents have been deceased for sev- 
eral years. 

As a youth Bro. Miller began his educa- 
tion in the one-roomed schoolhouse. He 
. was thorough and earnest, but at the same 
time possessed all the characteristics that 
might be implied from the term, " a live 
wire." For his preparatory work he en- 
tered Mt. Morris in 1907, and there com- 
pleted the academy with the class of 1912. 
He took a leading part in student activities 
and won the Philorhetorian contest in his 
senior year. Following this he taught coun- 
try school in Orange Township for two 
years, and this proved very valuable expe- 



B. Miller 

Blough 

rience. He was then recognized as an ef- 
ficient leader among young people in the 
community. Feeling that he could be of 
greater service in the world, and that he 
would have larger chances for success in 
life, he entered Ames for a course in ag- 
riculture. However, at this time he planned 
to devote his life as an agricultural spe- 
cialist in this country, though at times he 
considered the needs of India. The final 
decision came to him at the same time and 
place that it comes to many men, and that 
was at the Y. M. C. A. conference at Lake 
Geneva. And there on the lakeside, where 
God seems to come closer to men than at 
most places, Bro. Miller faced his God, sur- 
rendered his will, and volunteered to use 
his life on any corner of this earth that 
God would direct him. The latter two 
years at Ames were spent in active Chris- 
tian work, though at first, like many other 
students, Bro. Miller was not inclined to 
push out and tackle a big job. One day 
the " Y " secretary called him into his of- 
fice and said, " Miller, I want you to go on 
a gospel team to a near-by town." This 
so took Bro. Miller by surprise that his 
thinking powers ceased on everything but 
excuses, but when the interview ended Mil- 
ler went. In the year of his graduation, 
1917, he was leader of a successful gospel 
team, taught two classes of Bible students, 
and was recognized as a man of strong, 
earnest Christian leadership. 

The following year he accepted the po- 
sition of rural Y. M. C. A. secretary of 
Madison County, Iowa. Organizing this 
work and putting it on a permanent basis 
was no small task, but Bro. Miller proved 
its equal. He remained at this work for 
one year only. In June, 1918, he was mar- 
ried to Sister Jennie E. Blough, also of 
Waterloo. Ottumwa chanced to be the 
home of this happy couple, who deferred 
going to the mission field immediately on 
account of the draft. Soon it was neces- 
sary for him to respond to the call of his 
country, and six months of typical camp 
life in the medical department at Camp 
Dodge, suggested his next experience. He 
was honorably discharged in March, 1919, 
following which he taught in Orange High 



February 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



49 



School for several months. On Easter Sun- Added to this are his earnestness and sin- 



day, April 20, his home was greatly cheered 
by the arrival of a daughter, Josephine. 

As a man, Bro. Miller has a distinct 
personality. He is very practical and at 
the same time commands the respect of all. 



cerity of character, which make him a man 
of power, and one who we feel will do a 
great deal to uplift the rural people of In- 
dia, and at the same time carry the mes- 
sage of our Savior. 



Jennie Blough Miller 

A Friend 




WHILE the flowers slept beneath 
their white blanket, one season 
ago, a beautiful life went home to 
its Maker. But though the sweet face and 
kindly deeds of this 
dear grandmother are 
missed by those who 
loved her, her gentle 
influence and noble 
character live on in 
the lives of her pos- 
terity, and it is of one 
of her granddaugh- 
ters that this sketch 
is written. 

Jennie E. Blough, daughter of Peter J. 
and Katherine Horner Blough, was born 
on her father's old homestead near 
Hooversville, Pa., Dec. 6, 1893. The first 
thirteen years of her life were spent here 
and on the Ankeny farm, the birthplace of 
her mother. In 1904 her mother died, and 
a year later the family, consisting of fa- 
ther, Jennie and her two brothers, Homer 
and Dorsey, left the land of their fathers, 
with the changing environment that ac- 
companies a mining district, and moved to 
Waterloo, Iowa. Here Jennie's father 
married Amanda Lichty Speicher, and thus 
through the union of two broken homes 
Jennie found not only a good mother, but 
a bosom friend in her foster sister, Mary 
Speicher. The two girls met on the day 
of their parents' marriage, and it would be 
impossible to write the story of one with- 
out that of the other. Suffice it to say that 
it would be hard to find a more congenial 
home than the one which these girls shared 
from this time on. They were within a 
few months of being of the same age, and 
so nearly did they keep pace in all that 
they did, that through their four years of 
high school in Waterloo their averages 
never varied one per cent. Mary had be- 



come a Christian before she knew Jennie, 
but during a series of meetings, conducted 
by Bro. Moherman, Jennie united with the 
church at the age of fourteen. The home 
church proved a good place for develop- 
ment in Sunday-school lines, and both girls 
took an active part in such work. 

After finishing high school, Jennie spent 
the next seven years in teaching country 
school and attending Mt. Morris College, 
at which place she finished the course in 
liberal arts in 1918. While a student she 
was active in the different organizations of 
the school, and during her senior year was 
president of the newly-organized Y. W. C. 
A. She taught a large class of young ladies 
in the Sunday-school the last two years, 
and it was her joy to see a number of them 
become Christians. 

Always it is a matter of interest to know 
what are the direct influences that make 
our missionaries decide upon such a voca- 
tion for their life work; and while there are 
many silent influences which are difficult 
to analyze as such, there are some things 
which stand out as mileposts along the 
way. About nine years ago, when Eliza 
Miller (now Jennie's sister-in-law) was 
home on furlough, the seeds of missionary 
interest began to grow, and Jennie was 
deeply impressed with the things Eliza had 
to tell about the far-away land so dear to 
her. Another prominent factor was the 
Bible instruction under Bro. Emmert at 
Mt. Morris, and the work of the Volunteer 
Band at that place. Jennie was a member 
of this organization during most of her 
school life. All these influences paved the 
way for the definite decision for foreign 
work, which came in 1917 at the confer- 
ence of United Volunteers at Naperville, 
where a number of returned missionaries 
brought the appeal so strongly from the 
foreign field. Alone, with her God, Jennie 



50 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1920 



decided that if he wanted her to serve on 
the foreign field she was willing. And at 
the same time, but in vastly different cir- 
cumstances, the Spirit was working in the 
life of her fiance, Arthur Miller, then busy 
in his agricultural work at Ames, Iowa, so 
that he too chose to live" his life for the 
people across the sea. 

The same month that Jennie finished her 
college course she became a bride. It was 
the hope of Brother and Sister Miller to 
take up their chosen work that same year, 
yet because of war conditions it was not 
possible for her husband to go last year. 
He was active in the Y. M. C. A. until the 
call of the colors came and their happy 
home had to be given up for the time be- 
ing. After a few months of service he re- 
turned to Waterloo, where Jennie was liv- 
ing with her parents, and on Easter day a 
little girl, Josephine Ruth, came to brighten 
their home. So, as Jennie and her dear 
ones leave us, she goes, not only as a teach- 
er and church worker, but as a living wit- 
ness of the practicability of the teachings 



of Jesus in everyday life, which is, after 
all, the final test of Christianity. 




Josephine Ruth Miller 



Benjamin 

M. W. Emmert 

BENJAMIN F. SUMMER, the fourth 
of a family of six boys, was born 
Dec. 26, 1891, near Hagerstown, Md. 
He was born into the spiritual world in 
October, 1903, at the 
Longmeadow church 
in the Beaver Creek 
congregation, Mary- 
land. 

On account of the 
moderate circum- 
stances of his parents 
the boy was, at the 
age of ten, left to 
work as a hireling 
among strangers. 
However, his lot fell among members of 
the Church of the Brethren, and from them 
he received his early Christian training. 

At the early age of fourteen there was 
borne in upon his heart the irresistible de- 
sire to become a missionary to India. To 
his grandfather, John Summer, a Mennon- 
ite preacher, Bro. Summer attributes his in- 
herited desire to preach the Gospel. He 




F. Summer 

and Franklin Byer 

never got away from the one overwhelming 
desire to carry the good news of Christ to 
the heathen. He says he never tried to get 
away from it, but nursed the desire until 
he was eighteen years old, when he in- 
quired of Bro. Galen B. Royer what prepa- 
ration he would need to become a mission- 
ary to India. Bro. Royer told him he must 
have a literary education. 

Although he had no money he resolved 
at once to secure the necessary prepara- 
tion. He heard that Mt. Morris College 
was a place where young men might be 
able to work their way through school. 
Accordingly he turned his face westward 
and arrived in Polo, 111., near Mt. Morris, 
Jan. 6, 1910. After working a short time 
on a farm in the vicinity of Polo, he en- 
tered college at Mt. Morris. A marvelous 
change went on in the intellectual and re- 
ligious nature of this at first rather crude 
specimen of young manhood, until in the 
spring of 1918 he graduated from college, 
receiving the A. B. degree. 

Bro. Summer is a remarkable example of 



February 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



51 



simple, trusting faith in the Lord. Each 
year of his eight in school at Mt. Morris 
he started in, not knowing where he was 
to secure all the money needed to pay his 
way. But he went to the Lord in prayer, 
committing his case fully to the Lord. He 
took Jesus at his word when he said, " If 
ye abide in me and my words abide in you, 
ask whatsoever ye will and it shall be done 
unto you." The Lord heard his prayers 
and provided the way. He did sweeping, 
served as janitor for the college chapel, 
rang the college bell, served as librarian 
for several years, received a scholarship of 
$100, given by Mt. Morris, Polo, Pine 
Creek and West Branch churches, and 
served one year as pastor of Hickory Grove 
church. He spent his summer vacations 
as a farm hand or engaged in canvassing. 

No opportunity was ever missed while 
Bro. Summer was in school to develop his 
spiritual life. He always was present at 
devotional classes and meetings. He not 
only attended these meetings but he en- 
deavored to contribute something to them. 
His desire for religious services and his 
burning zeal for missions led him to be 
active in the Student Volunteer Band. For 
several years he was president of the band. 
Under his leadership the band took on new 
life and interest. The students of Mt. Mor- 
ris College owe a good deal to his leader- 
ship in missionary endeavor. He spent 
much time in secret prayer and Bible study. 

We quote a few selections from a recent 
letter written by Bro. Summer, which will 
tell more about his character than any 
words we may write: 

"When I reflect on God's wondrous 
graciousness to me ever since I began to 
cherish the purpose of becoming a foreign 
missionary and up until this present mo- 
ment, I am simply overwhelmed. ' What 
shall I render to my God for all his bene- 
fits?' I am resolved what I shall do. I 
am determined that I shall spend the rest 
of my days thanking him through humble, 
sacrificial service wherever he leads and at 
whatever the cost to me. Surely, it is most 
true, that ' he shall give thee the desires 
of thine heart.' 'Trust also in him; and he 
shall bring it to pass.' . . .1 just count 
myself debtor to the whole world because 
of what he has done for me." 



The summer months following his grad- 
uation Bro. Summer spent in pastoral work 
at Cambridge, Nebr. At the opening of 
school in the fall he assumed the professor- 
ship of mathematics and language in He- 
bron Seminary at Nokesville, Va. 

He took hold of this work of teaching 
with a faithful earnestness which at once 
won for him the confidence of the students. 
He performed his work in an efficient man- 
ner and was making his mark as a teacher. 
But he was always willing also to help in 
whatever else his hands found to do. No 
work was too menial for him; nothing be- 
neath his dignity if it contributed to the 
success of the institution, upon which he 
looked as a means in the accomplishment 
of that to which he had dedicated his life — 
the* evangelization of the world. 

Another phase of Bro. Summer's work at 
Hebron Seminary, which proved most val- 
uable and helpful, was his leadership in 
missionary interests among the students. 
As president of the Volunteer Band he was 
a constant stimulus to them, and many and 
lasting are the impressions of sacrifice, 
service and evangelization that he made 
upon these young lives, some of whom, we 
have reason to believe, will follow his ex- 
ample and some day join him in his chosen 
field of service. 

Following his work at Hebron Seminary 
he was engaged by the General Mission 
Board to travel among the churches in 
Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia in 
the interest of the mission cause. In this 
also Bro. Summer was successful. His ad- 
dresses were strong in mission sentiment 
and his efforts bore fruits, both in acces- 
sions to the church and in funds for her 
great mission. Much might be written con- 
cerning his personal touch with the young 
people, but eternity alone will reveal what 
was accomplished in his private conferenc- 
es with them. 

The friends of Hebron Seminary had 
hoped that the institution and the District 
would benefit by another year of Bro. Sum- 
mer's services, but since the Lord has se- 
lected him for a larger and needier field at 
this time they rejoice with him in his great- 
er opportunities and bid him Godspeed. 
Their prayerful interest will continue in his 
behalf. 



52 



The Missionary Visitor 

Verna Mabel Blickenstaff 

D. J. Blickenstaff 



February 
1920 



VERNA MABEL BLICKENSTAFF 
is the daughter of Levi and Barbara 
(Wagoner) Blickenstaff, who at the 
time of her birth lived in a pleasant coun- 
try home near Oak- 
ley, 111. 

These parents 
made the Church of 
the Brethren their 
choice in early life. 
Into this pleasant en- 
vironment, Jan. 31, 
1891, Verna came to 
gladden the hearts 
and brighten the 
home of these young 
parents. The joys of 
this happy home life 
were limited to a few years. When Verna 
was three years old the mother was called 
to her spiritual home, leaving the father 
and children to struggle in life as best they 
could. Kind friends and relatives opened 
their hearts and homes, so that the children 
were kept under a Christian influence. 

In September, 1900, the home was re- 
established when Mattie E. Davis, of As- 
toria, 111., with a kind, loving mother heart, 
came to be a companion to the father and a 
mother to these children. Thus they lived 
happily together, the children having the 




benefit of a good country school education. 

Jan. 4, 1903, during a revival in the Oak- 
ley congregation, conducted by Eld. J. W. 
Lear, both Verna and her brother Leo ac- 
cepted Christ, and have been faithful and 
active in the various departments of Chris- 
tian service. 

Verna attended Mt. Morris College, grad- 
uating from the academic department in 

1910. Entering Bethany Bible School in 

1911, she was engaged in Bible study and 
practical Christian work until 1914. Thus 
she was brought face to face with suffering 
humanity, and having a desire in her heart 
to be of enlarged service to such, she en- 
tered the Illinois Training School for Nurs- 
es in the fall of 1914, from which she was 
graduated in 1917. During 1917-1919 she 
was busy in professional nursing in various 
hospitals and in the home community. 

At Winona Lake, June 9, 1919, this con- 
secrated worker, with others, was con- 
firmed, by the General Conference for the 
India field. The family at home, the church, 
and the community, follow her with prayer- 
ful interest, trusting that God will bless her 
consecrated efforts, in comforting and help- 
ing suffering humanity, and to the uplifting 
of a fallen race. 

Oakley, 111. 



Nettie Pearl Brown 

Neva M. Replogle 



NETTIE PEARL BROWN is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Reuben 
Brown. Her parents are residents 
of Henry County, Ind., in which county 
Sister Nettie always 
has lived, except 
when pursuing her 
educational work. 

She was born July 
27, 1891, near Blounts- 
ville, Ind. As a child 
she was always quiet 
and timid. Her earli- 
est recollections are 
of playing church on 
the stair steps. She 




also remembers her first year of school, 
when for three weeks she was too bashful 
to talk or recite to the teacher. The teach- 
er, getting desperate, gave her a spanking, 
after which there was always a ready re- 
sponse. 

Her early education was secured at the 
District school near her home. After com- 
pleting the common-school course, Nettie 
entered high school at Hagerstown, Ind., 
making her home with her sister, Mrs. Ed 
Ulrich. After finishing the high-school 
work in 1909 she entered Manchester Col- 
lege for normal work, and it was here she 
received her first inspiration for Christian 
service. 



February 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



53 



After teaching school for two years the 
Spirit of the Lord called her, and on Feb. 
18, 1911, she was baptized in the Buck 
Creek congregation, Southern Indiana, un- 
der the efforts of Eld. Edson Ulery. 

Having a desire for preparation for 
church work, Sister Nettie took the one 
year Sunday-school normal course at Man- 
chester College, receiving a diploma in 
1912. Then she again took up school teach- 
ing for two more years but, desiring fur- 
ther biblical preparation, she attended 
Bethany Bible School the year of 1914-15. 
While teaching in the Jewish Night School 
she received a vision of what it meant to 
not know the Christ, and thus she became 



a member of the Student Volunteer Band. 

The next two years she devoted her time 
and talents in various activities in her home 
congregation, attending Bethany again in 
the summer of 1916. She became a foreign 
volunteer in the winter of 1917 and went to 
Manchester College to finish the bachelor 
of arts course, graduating in May, 1919. 
She applied to the Mission Board and was 
accepted for work in India. 

Sister Nettie always has had a desire to 
do mission work of some kind and is hap- 
py to think that she may have the oppor- 
tunity to help save souls in India. We 
shall miss her, but our benedictions will fol- 
low her on the way. 



Anna Belle Brumbaugh 




Virginia 

ANNA BELLE BRUMBAUGH, 
daughter of Cyrus and Catherine 
Brumbaugh, is the eldest in a fam- 
ily of three daughters. On her father's 
side her ancestors for 
generations have 
been members of the 
Church of the Breth- 
ren. On her mother's 
side her grandparents 
were John and Mary 
Kurtz. Her grandfa- 
ther served for many 
years as a minister 
and elder in the 
church. Anna's moth- 
er was the fourth in a family of twelve 
brothers and sisters. Mrs. Culler, mother 
of Bro. A. J. Culler, is the third in the 
family, and Dr. D. W. Kurtz, president of 
McPherson College, Kans., is the youngest. 
Anna was born Dec. 1, 1891, near Hart- 
ville, Ohio, on the farm adjoining the one 
on which her father now resides. After 
finishing the country school, near by, she 
was graduated from a four-year course at 
the Hartville High School in 1910. The 
following year was spent at Juniata Col- 
lege. The years 1912-1914 were occupied 
with public-school teaching, but while en- 
gaged in this work she felt that she was 
not doing the thing most acceptable to her 
God. So in the fall of 1913 she entered 
Juniata College, enrolled in the sacred lit- 



Bixler 

erature course and received her diploma in 
1916. 

Anna's mother departed this life Feb. 7, 
1913, and since that time the care of the 
home has devolved upon one of the daugh- 
ters. In September, 1916, Amanda, the 
youngest daughter, enrolled in the house- 
hold economics at Juniata College. Anna 
planned to care for the home and mean- 
while obtain further credits at Juniata 
through correspondence. In October Aman- 
da became ill and was compelled to return 
home. Anna gladly and cheerfully cared 
for her during her long illness. September, 
1917, again found Anna at Juniata, this time 
with the completion of the college course 
in view. She received her A. B. degree in 
June, 1919, and the same month was ac- 
cepted by the Winona Conference for the 
India field. During all her years at college 
she helped meet expenses by waiting on 
tables in the college dining hall. 

Anna united with the church June 5, 
1904, and has proved a faithful and efficient 
worker ever since. Whenever she was at 
home and during each vacation she taught 
in the Sunday-school, her pupils usually 
being children between the ages of 8 and 
12 years. Anna does not remmeber when 
she did not feel an interest in the benighted 
of heathen lands, and her desire always 
has been that some day she might be per- 
mitted to be of some service to them. Dur- 
ing her life at Juniata, where she came in 



54 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1920 



contact with instructors who have visions 
of greater things to be, this desire crys- 
tallized into action, and in 1914 she became 
a foreign volunteer. Her association with 
students of similar aspirations, her oppor- 
tunities of meeting and listening to Juni- 
ata's own sons and daughters, returned 
from the foreign field, gave the encourage- 
ment needed to go on with her work. 

It seems that all through Anna's life 
there have been many obstacles to over- 
come, whether of a financial nature or oth- 
erwise, and to those of us who know her 
best the loving tribute the June number of 
the Juniata College paper pays her is very 
fitting. The Echo speaks of her as a " splen- 
didly heroic character," and " one of most 



high and unselfish ideals"; "a charming 
example of religious devotion and conse- 
cration, together with that of a close stu- 
dent," " an inspiration to all struggling 
ones aspiring to higher things in the face 
of obstacles." 

Anna is being supported on the foreign 
field by the East Nimishillen congrega- 
tion. The Young People's Band and the 
various Sunday-school classes have given 
her some financial assistance in her final 
preparation for her trip. 

Now that her aim is about to be realized, 
she is. very, very happy and anxious to go. 
May the Lord care for her and richly bless 
her is the prayer of her many friends. 



Why We Go to India 

Personal Statements 



Having heard his call and having received 
his implanting of this purpose at the age 
of fourteen, and now my joy in his fellow- 
shiping with me being so abounding and 
my satisfaction of his meeting my every 
need being so complete, I cannot do other- 
wise than devote my life in helping to 
make him known to those who as yet have 
not heard. 

Joyfully in his service, 

Benj. F. Summer. 

When we think of God's great love for 
the world and of Christ's supreme sacrifice 
in carrying out God's plan, it seems a bless- 
ed privilege to be counted "ambassadors 
for Christ " in " the ministry of reconcili- 
ation." 

We are going to India because we believe 
the Lord can best use us there ; knowing 
that the place of duty is the place of bless- 
ing. 

We go, praying for the continued spirit- 
ual growth of our home churches ; believ- 
ing that the future success of the work on 
the foreign field is dependent upon the 
faithful backing up of the church on the 
home base with recruits, finances and pray- 
ers. " Pray ye therefore the Lord of the 
harvest, that he send forth laborers into 
his harvest." 

Andrew G. and Bertha L. Butterbaugh. 



I am going to India because I feel that I 
have been led to that field of service. As I 
look back I can see how the Lord has led 
me through the years of preparation that I 
might best serve him in that needy field. 
It is this that gives me the courage to go 
out, feeling that he will continue to guide 
and keep me in Ihe ways he would have 
me go. 

Verna Blickenstaff. 

I am never happier than when in active 
Christian service. This joy led me to give 
myself completely over to the Lord, to be 
used of him wherever he might direct. At 
first I sought for mission work in the 
homeland; but the way was closed until I 
felt led by the Lord to volunteer for for- 
eign service, and that way opened quickly 
and he has continued to keep it open. I go 
to India feeling sure that that is where the 
Lord would have me. Nettie Brown. 

As a child I was much interested in hear- 
ing about the poor people of India, and 
hoped I might sometime help them. As 
I have grown older, I haven't been able to 
find an excuse for staying at home, and so 
gladly go to do what I can. 

Anna Brumbaugh. 



February 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



55 



There was nothing out of the ordinary 
in my call to the India field, only the call 
of the unsaved of India and the constant 
pleadings of the missionary force on the 
field for new recruits. I am glad to offer 
my services in whatever way I can serve 
him best. May the Lord find me faithful 
as a laborer in his vineyard. 

Jennie Blough Miller. 

Being reared in a home whence have 
gone two missionaries, and in a community 
that has sent four workers to the India 
field, and having been trained in prepara- 
tory work at Mt. Morris College, where 
the missionary spirit always has been high, 
there never was any question with me as 
to the world's needs. My only question 
was as to my qualification, and I left that 
to the General Mission Board and the Lord 
to decide and they said GO. I thank the 
Lord for the opportunity, and in his 
strength do I go. Arthur B. Miller. 



During our days of preparation in col- 
lege and seminary we met many returned 
missionaries and had the opportunity of 
attending a number of missionary conven- 
tions. These experiences, together with 
our Bible study, brought to us a vision of 
the needy world and led us to dedicate 
our lives unreservedly to Christ. 

It was in December, 1918, that there first 
came to us the definite request to consider 
going to India in the fall of 1919. Many 
days of prayerful consideration followed 
this request. Other avenues of service and 
a desire for further specialization had their 
pull, but step by step the Lord led us to 
see his will for our lives. We are happy 
for the privilege of thus serving him. Many 
hundreds freely gave their lives for their 
country; why should not we give ours for 
our blessed Master, who has done more for 
us than country ever could? 

C. G. and Mary Shull. 



Our Choicest Gifts We Bring 

Statements of Parents 



We have always prayed the Lord to lead 
our children in the path of duty, and in the 
way he would have them go. 

For a long time our only daughter, Ber- 
tha, has been looking toward the foreign 
mission field. And now very soon she, with 
her husband and family, sails for India. 
With sorrow fully overcome, with joy we 
give her willingly, by asking God's bless- 
ing and protection. May the loving Fa- 
ther make her a blessing to others in his 
name. 

Ira Lehman, 
Mary Lehman, 
Parents of Bertha Lehman Butterbaugh. 

Verna has had a desire to go to the for- 
eign field for a number of years. We feel 
to praise our Heavenly Father for this spir- 
it of willingness to serve him in far-away 
India. Our prayers go with her and to our 
dear Father above that he may ever keep 
her under his protecting care. 

Levi and Mattie Blickenstaff, 
Parents of Verna. 



We have been willing to let the Lord di- 
rect us to his chosen field. W r hen we were 
ready to go the India field seemed the most 
needy; the call came from there with the 
most insistence, and it was laid on our 
hearts to answer the call and to help supply 
the need. J. E. and Ellen H. Wagoner. 

J* 
It is with a great deal of reluctance that 
I have given my consent for Elmer to go 
so far away. But if it is God's will, I feel 
that I should not stand in the way. We 
hope it may all be for the best. 

Eli S. Wagoner. 

My dear and only daughter, Ellen B. 
Heckman W r agoner, I cannot say no to 
your going on the mission field to India, 
for your parents dedicated you when quite 
young to the Lord's service. 

May God be with you and your dear 
companion and the children whom we love 
so much. Your father, 

David Heckman. 



56 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1920 



We rejoice that our daughter, Jennie, has 
consecrated her life for service to the 
church. We are glad that she has pre- 
pared herself to carry the Gospel to the 
heathen, where they are so much in need 
of help. We pray that she may be success- 
ful in the good work which she has chosen, 
and may our Heavenly Father strengthen 
her to do his will. 

Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Blough. 

To see our dear ones go so far away 
cannot help but make our hearts feel sad. 
But we look beyond this, and when we 
think of the blessing they may be to those 
who have never known our Master our 
hearts are full of joy, that they are per- 
mitted to go. Mary was dedicated to the 
Lord at her birth, and her going to the 
mission field is an answer to her parents' 
prayers, which were offered up daily in 
» her behalf. Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Blough. 

Waterloo, Iowa, Dec. 17, 1919. 

J* 
When my daughter, Nettie, said she was 
going to the foreign mission field, I could 
hardly bear the thought, but when war was 
declared I thought of my five sons and 
what that would mean to them. Then the 
thought came to me, " How much I would 
rather have a child go to the foreign coun- 
try to do mission work!" And then I re- 
membered I gave her over to the Lord be- 
fore she was born, that she might be a 



worker for him, so I could not object. 
Mooreland, Ind. Mary A. Brown. 

While I feel very keenly that my daugh- 
ter, Anna, is needed in the home very 
much, and can hardly bear to think of her 
leaving us and going to a foreign field, 
nevertheless I pray the Father that her 
longed-for wishes may be accomplished. 

May we all pray, that all of our mission- 
aries may be able to do much for the va- 
rious points in the mission fields. 

Hartville, Ohio. Cyrus Brumbaugh. 

We have constantly prayed that Chalmer, 
our first-born, might consecrate himself 
fully to the Lord's work, and that the Holy 
Spirit might lead him into the special field 
where his life would count for the most in 
the salvation of souls. While the home 
ties are strong and the tears come unbid- 
den when we think of the long separation, 
we push back the thought and praise God 
for answered prayer. 

May he bless and keep him and his dear 
companion, and may his will be done at 
any cost. W. H. and Clara Shull. 

J* 

My dear Son Andrew: I cannot say no 
to your going to India, as your parents 
dedicated your life to the Lord in youth. 
Go, and be thou a blessing to many. 

Margaret L. Butterbaugh (mother). 



Leaving Home and Father 



Fred M. Hollenberg 



(Oct. 11, 1919, Nora and I left home on our way to 
India, mother accompanying us part of the way. 
We three were going away and George and father 
were the only ones left at home, the others having 
left for school about three weeks before.) 

The day had come when the eldest son 
Should leave the love which he had known 
For full one-fourth a hundred years — 
The home which stilled his early fears 
And planned and gave his life its aid; 
The home where love and memory staid. 
We laid our plans and little said 
Of all those things which make one sad; 
We'd spoke to cheer each other on 
The daily course as days sped on. 
But as that time drew near there came 
A hush o'er all, but all the same 
We went about our daily task 
With here and there a question asked. 
The morning meal had been prepared, 



The early chores had all been cleared, 
And round the morning fire so bright 
We gathered by the coal-oil light 
To have the usual morning prayer 
And ask a blessing on our care. 
My father took the Book and read 
The parting words of Paul, whose head 
Was soon to fall for his Master's cause — 
But here dear father had to pause 
And clear his voice and wipe his eyes, 
And mother scarce could hold her sighs, 
While I with head bowed down could hear 
Her heavy breath and knew the tear 
Was life from out her gracious heart, 
Which oft had shed blood for my part. 
He read again, again did pause; 
He started on, but love's great laws 
Would scarce permit his voice to speak, 
(Continued on Page 64) 



February 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



57 





REPORT 



Correction. The $32.61 credited to Snake Creek 
Congregation in December Visitor for World-Wide 
Missions should be credited to Snake Creek Sunday- 
school. 

The $12.50 credited to Emma Devilbiss in the 
December Visitor for India Share Plan should be 
credited to Ottawa Aid Society. 

During December the Board sent out 170,588 pages 
of tracts. 

The following contributions to the Board's funds 
were received during December: 

WORLD-WIDE 

Pennsylvania— $1,990.81 

Western District, Congregations 

Rummell, $63.50; Jacob's Creek, $13.87; 

Montgomery, $22.25 $ 99 62 

Individuals 

Thomas Hardin and Son, $1; Mrs. Elmer 
Walker (Deceased), $1,000; Mr. and Mrs. 
Ross, $5; Mrs. Pauline Seese, $5; Mrs. 
Frances Moore, $5; D. P. Hoover, 50c; Wm. 

N. Bond, $5, 1,021 50 

Middle District, Congregations 

Snake Spring, $53.61; Lewistown, $79.49; 

Spring Run, $10.15, 143 25 

Individuals 

Annie E. Miller, $5; J. C. Stayer, $2; J. S. 
Guyer, $1; Carrie Dunkle, $1; Mary Kinsey, 
$10; T. T. Myers, $1.50; Galen B. Royer. 
$1.40; J. C. Stayer, $3; Levi E. Greenwalt. 

$2 26 90 

Sunday-school, 

Snyder Cross Roads 10 00 

Southern District, Congregations 

Welsh Run, $59.40; Carlisle, $6; Codorus, 
$146.09; Pleasant Hill, $100; Upper Cone- 

wago, $50.67 362 16 

Sunday-school 

Pleasant Hill, 21 70 

Individuals 

Ellen Strouser, $1; Daniel and Mary 

Brown, $10 1100 

Eastern District, Congregations 

White Oak, $92; East Petersburg, $37.50; 

Indian Creek, $61.82, 191 32 

Sunday-school 

Willing Workers Class (Mirigo Cong.),.. 20 25 

Christian Workers 

Elizabethtown 13 11 

Individuals 

J. S. Harley, $3; Jas. Fitzwater, $3; 
Blanche Hewitt, $1; H. J. Beachley, $6, . . . . 13 00 

Southeastern District, Congregation 

Calvary Mission, 57 00 

Ohio— $680.30 

Southern District, Congregations 

East Dayton, $20; New Carlisle, $33.70, .. 53 70 

Christian Workers 

Ludlow, 6 00 

Individuals 

L. C. McCorkle and Family, $30; Jacob 
P. Getz, 60c; Eli Niswonger, $1.20; W. H. 
Folkerth, $1.20; Katie M. Hoke, $40; Jesse 
Brumbaugh, $1.20; A Sister (Carlisle 

Cong.), $10, 84 20 

Northeastern District, Congregations 

Chippewa, $50; Black River, $34 70; East 

Nimishillen, $40; Fredericksburg, $13.20 137 90 

Sunday-school 

Wooster 22 00 

Individuals 

Alfred and Elizabeth Longanecker, $5; 
Receipt No. 46092, $10; A Brother, Baltic 
Cong., $3; Samuel Feller, $1; A. H. Miller 

(Mar. Not.), 50c; Mary A. Shroyer, $3 22 50 

Northwestern District, Individual 

L. H. Cook, 40 



Congregations 

Logan, $7.43; Pleasant View, $269.48; Sil- 
ver Creek, $34.18; No. Poplar Ridge, $26.51, 
Sunday-school 

South Poplar, 

Illinois— $901.63 

Northern District, Congregations 

Batavia, $13.88; Elgin, $7; Milledgeville, 

$96.70; Franklin Grove, $612.82, 

Sunday-schools 

Elgin, $5; Shannon, $27.05, 

Aid Society 

Franklin Grove, 

Individuals 

Anna Fry, $5; W. R. Bratten, $5; John C. 
and Lillian Lampin, $5; Jennie S. Harley, 
$1.20; D. C. McGonigle, $2.50; O. D. Buck 
(Mar. Not.), 50c; Wm. Wingerd, $12; Elias 
Weigle, $5; S. S. Shively (Mar. Not.), 50c; 

W. E. West, $2; Mrs. R. Thomas, $1, 

Southern District, Congregations 

Okaw, $26.25; Cerro Gordo, $25.08; Oak 

Grove, $2.15, 

Individuals 

Frank and Lizzie Etnoyer, $5; Mr. and 

Mrs. J. B. Werner, $25, 

Indiana— $353.92 

Northern District, Congregations 

Goshen City, $26.66; Yellow Creek, $57.50; 

North Liberty, $10.50, 

Sunday-school 

Wawaka, 

Individuals 

Samuel Good, $1; Christian Stouder, $5; 
Mrs. Jas. Weaver, $1; Levi Zimbrum, $12; 
Cornelia Flinn, $1; I. L. Berkey, $1; E. M. 

Rough, $1; S.B. Reppert and Wife, $30 

Middle District, Congregations 

Spring Creek, $27.30; Manchester, $13, ... 
Sunday-school 

Roann 

Individuals 

Kathryn M. Royer, $1; John E. Miller, 
50c; Frank Fisher, $1; Walter Balsbaugh, 

$5; John W. Hoover, $1.25, 

Southern District, Congregations 

Buck Creek, $34.55; Anderson, $18.70; Net- 
tle Creek, $49, 

Aid Society 

Brick 

Individuals 

D. C. Campbell, $1; A. F. Loveless, $20; 
W. L. Hatcher (Mar. Not.), 50c; Chris 
Cripe, 10c; John W. Root (Mar. Not.), 50c; 

E. and R. Fausbaugh, $8.80, 

Virginia— $155.47 

Second District, Congregation 

Valley Bethel, 

Individuals 

M. G. Sanger, $1; Lucy E. Evers, 25c; 
Martha 'Evers, 25c; Mary Evers, 25c; Sa- 
lome Gochenour, $1; Jas. R. Shipman, $1.50; 
Cora Garber, $5; John Wampler, $1; J. H. 
and Bettie Lamb, $5; M. A. and Lydia 

Evers, $1; John S. Flory, $1.50, 

Eastern District, Congregation 

Valley, 

Sunday-school 

Valley 

Individuals 

Helen Sandaal, $1; Nelie Wampler, $1; 

Carl Miller, $1; Geo. W. Shaffer, $2, 

Southern District, Congregations 

Christiansburg, $13; Redoak Grove, $9.27; 

Topeco, $20.20; Germantown, $3, 

Individual 

A. N. Hylton 



338 00 
16 00 

730 40 
32 05 
16 00 



39 70 
53 48 
30 00 

94 66 

700 

52 00 

40 30 
3 06 

8 75 

111 00 
15 00 

30 90 
20 61 



17 75 
20 00 
3 17 

500 

45 47 
1 00 



58 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1920 



Northern District, Congregation 

Cedar Grove 39 27 

Individuals 

Hugh Mowry, $1; Madison Kline, 50c; 
Benj. Cline, 50c; Samuel Huffman, $1.20, .. 3 20 

California— $367.76 
Northern District, Congregations 

Empire, $36.32; Live Oak, $25; Lindsay, 

$37.77, 9909 

Individuals 

T. N. Becker, 60c; Sarah Becker, $1; 
Thomas Becker, $2; D. S. Musselman, $1.75; 

Josiah Huffman and Family, $20, 25 35 

Southern District, Congregations 

Pasadena, $98.74; La Verne, $81.58 180 32 

Individuals 

David Blickenstaff, $5; Magdalena Myers, 
$5; S. W. Bock, $41; Ira Studebaker, $5; A 
Sister, $1; D. E. Lyon, $1; M. Grace Miller, , 

$5 63 00 

West Virginia— $560.89 

First District, Congregations 

Beaver Run, $33.01; Harness Run, $30; 
White Pine, $12.10; Fair Play, $25.29; Sandy 
Creek, $97.76; Harman, $37.36; Maple Spring, 
$125.50; Glade View, $13.76; Old Furnace, 

$25; Broadside, $20.40, 420 18 

Sunday-schools 

Primary Class (Fairview S. S.), $1.38; 

Lime Rock, $23.50, 24 88 

Individuals 

Geo. F. Leatherman, $10; Ollie F. Idleman, 
$16.78; Harris Harman, $29; A. Harman, $14; 
Jesse Harman, $10; Emma Dovel, $10; Stella 

A. Cosner, $1, 90 78 

Second District, Congregations 

Gormania, $9.13; Valley River, $6.42; 

Knobly, $9; Bethany, $23.35, 47 90 

Individual 

J. F. Ross, 50 

Maryland— $537.91 

Eastern District, Congregations 

Long Green, $55.60; Beaver Dam, $23.34; 

Washington City, $24.64, 103 58 

Individuals 

Geo. W. Petre, $1; John D. Roop, $3; W. 

B. and Emma Yount, $100, 104 00 

Middle District, Congregations 

Manor, $120.87; Broadfording, $102.81; 
Bear Creek, $40.59; Meadow Creek, $6/1.56, .. 326 83 
Individuals 

Delia Garber, $2; Madeline Hammond, 

$1; J. S. Bowlus (Mar. Not.), 50c, 3 50 

Iowa— $170.76 

Northern District, Congregation 

Curlew, 5 00 

Individuals 

Mrs. Tete Zapf, $2; A. P. Blough (2 Mar. 
Not.), $1; T. L. Kimmel, $2; Mrs. Ed- 
ward Zapf, $5; S. W. Kennedy, $20, 30 00 

Middle District, Individuals 

D. Fry, $3; Samuel Beeghly, $10; C. B. 

Rowe, $1; Louisa Artz, 50c 14 50 

Sunday-school 

Panther Creek, 21 81 

Congregations 

Des Moines Valley, $8.45; Garrison, $35.50, 43 95 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Franklin . . . . 5 00 

Southeastern District, Sunday-school 

Salem, 50 50 

Missouri— $262.71 

Southwestern District, Congregation 

Peace Valley 10 00 

Individual 

Mrs. Wm. S. Long, 150 

Middle District, Individuals 

E. O. Barnheart, 50c; P. C. Peterson, $25, 25 50 
Northern District, Congregations 

Wankandah, $164.55; Rockingham, $61.16, 225 71 

Kansas— $176.00 

Northeastern District, Individual 

George Mannon, 50 

Northwestern District, Individuals 

Mary Shick, $25; Four Girls, Oberlin, 

$5.35; Mrs. Mary Roller, $1 31 35 

Southwestern District, Congregation 

Conway Springs, 9 30 



Individuals 

Martha Frantz (Deceased), $97; H. D. 

Michael (Mar. Not.), 50c, 97 50 

Southeastern District, Congregation 

Mont Ida, 10 50 

Sunday-school 

Mont Ida, 6 85 

Individual 

A. B. Lichtenwalter, 20 00 

Michigan— $30.50 
Congregations 

Beaverton, $22; Thornapple, $1.50, 23 50 

Individuals 

D. W. Vaniman, $1; Joseph Robison, $1; 
J. C. Harrison, $1.20; Sylvia Ulery, $3.80, .. 7 00 

Nebraska— $130.44 
Congregations 

South Beatrice, $51.44; Bethel, $75, 126 44 

Individuals 

Rosa Sisler, $3; Ross Lichty, $1, 4 00 

Tennessee— $51.25 
Congregations 

Beaver Creek, $7; Meadow Branch, $9.75, 16 75 

Individuals 

Mrs. M. M. Fine, $2; Will C. Young, 

$22.50; Mrs. D. T. Keebler, $10, 34 50 

Washington— $74.95 
Congregations 

Centralia, $12; Outlook, $44.45, 56 45 

Individuals 

Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Hixson, $12; Mrs. O. 
S. Prat, $1; J. S. Zimmerman, 50c; Eliza- 
beth Bock, $5, , 18 50 

Oregon— $40.50 
Congregations 

Newberg, $8; Ashland and Talent, $32.50, 40 50 

Colorado— $11.72 
Individuals 

H. F. Crist, 50c; C. W. Bond, $6.22; Con- 
rad Fitz, $5, 11 72 

North Carolina— $98.05 
Congregations 

Pleasant Grove, $46.10; Brummetts Creek, 
$5; Melvin Hill, $23.15; Mill Creek, $21.80,.. 96 05 

Individuals 

Nettie Smith, $1; J. W. Honeycutt, $1, .. 2 00 

Minnesota— $21.35 
Congregation 

Lewiston, 13 85 

Individuals 

D. F. Landis, $1.50; Crumbs from Monti- 
cello Christmas dinner table, $6, 7 50 

Idaho— $41.00 

Boise Valley Aid (Memory of Elizabeth 

Ulery), $16; A Sister, $25 4100 

Montana — $4.00 
Individuals 

Annetta Yarger, $3; Samuel Shilling, $1, 4 00 

South Dakota— $27.00 

Individuals • 

Mrs. L. W. Thurston, $5; D. R. Bald- 
win, $22 27 00 

North Dakota— $35.82 
Congregation 

Kenmore, 32 32 

Individuals 

J. M. Fike, $3; D. M. Shorb (Mar. 

Not.), 50c, 3 50 

Texas— $20.00 
Individuals 

Lottie E. Carver, $2; Samuel Molsbee, $18, 20 00 

Wisconsin— $5.00 

Individual 

Mollie Barton 5 00 

Alabama— $1.00 
Individual 

Mrs. W. A. Maust, 100 

Canada— $2.90 

Individual 

S. M. Burger, 2 90 

Oklahoma— $1.20 
Individual 

Wm. P. Bosserman, 1 20 

Total for the month, $ 4,317 68 



February 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



59 



Conference Offering for December, 4,867 68 

Previously reported, 149,865 39 

Total for the year, $159,050 75 

HOME MISSIONS 

Nebraska— $15.40 

Congregation 

Alvo, 7 50 

Sunday-school 

Alvo, 7 90 

Massachusetts — $13.00 
Individual 

L. M. West 13 00 

Illinois— $4.88 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Elgin 4 88 

Virginia — $3.50 

Eastern District, Congregation 

Mine Run, 3 50 

Total for the month, $ 36 78 

Previously reported, 311 38 

Total to date, $ 348 16 

INDIA MISSION 
California— $115.67 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

La Verne, 105 67 

Individual 

C. C. Gish 5 00 

Northern District, Individual 

J. Edw. Jarboe, 5 00 

Iowa— $40.00 

Middle District, Congregation 

Brooklyn, 40 00 

Illinois— $8.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Shannon 3 00 

Individual 

A Sister 5 00 

Maryland — $8.00 

Western District, Individuals 

Minnie Miller, $1; Mrs. Mary E. Arnold, 
$5; Cora Shaffer, $2, 8 00 

Oregon— $5.00 

Individual 

A. E. Troyer 5 00 

Pennsylvania — $2.00 
Southern District, Individual 

J. R. Davis, 2 00 

Ohio— $19.00 

Northeastern District, Individual 

Receipt No. 46093, 10 00 

Indiana— $5.00 

Southern District, Individual 

Mattie Mathews, 5 00 

West Virginia— $23.35 

Second District, Congregation 

Bethany 23 35 

Total for the month, $ 217 02 

Previously reported, 1,256 82 

Total to date $ 1,473 84 

INDIA NATIVE WORKER 
Ohio— $55.00 

Northeastern District, Aid Society 

Pleasant View, 25 00 

Sunday-school and Christian Workers 

Hartville 15 00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Greenville 15 00 

Iowa— $65.00 

Middle District, Sunday-schools 

Dallas Center, $30; Garrison, $35, 65 00 

Indiana— $112.00 

Northern District, Congregation 

Solomons Creek 32 00 

Individuals 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Ulery 50 00 

Southern District, Aid Society- 
Buck Creek, 30 00 

Pennsylvania— $37.00 

Eastern District, Sunday-school 



Indian Creek, 32 00 

Individual 

Frances Baker, 5 00 

Arizona — $46.45 
Congregation 

Glendale, 46 45 

Maryland — $5.00 

Eastern District, Sunday-school 

Edgewood, 5 00 

Michigan— $60.00 
Sunday-school 

Onekama 60 00 

California— $15.00 

Northern District, Congregation 

Empire, 15 00 

Illinois— $18.00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Woodland, 15 00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Shannon 3 00 

Texas— $25.00 
Sunday-school 

Manvel 25 00 

Alabama — $11.85 
Congregations 

Fruitdale, Cedar Creek, Brewton and 

Mobile 11 85 

South Dakota— $12.50 
Sunday-school 

Willow Creek, 12 50 

Total for the month, $ 452 80 

Previously reported 463 30 

Total to date $ 916 10 

INDIA BOARDING SCHOOL 
Indiana — $106.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Class No. 7, Goshen City 7 50 

Christian Workers 

Turkey Creek, 6 25 

Individual 

Mrs. Albert Gump, 100 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

King's Daughters' Class, Rossville 6 25 

Individual 

Anna Wagoner, 25 00 

Middle District, Sunday-schools 

Loon Creek, $35; Willing Workers, Flora, 

$25, 60 00 

Pennsylvania — $166.16 
Middle District, Aid Society 

Everett, 25 00 

Congregation 

Yellow Creek 35 00 

Western District, Sunday-schools 

Plum Creek, $35; Primary Class of Sum- 
mitt, $5.75, 40 75 

Eastern District, Sunday-school 

Beginners Class, Lancaster, 5 41 

Southeastern District, Sunday-school 

Green Tree, 25 00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Ever Ready Class, Farmers Grove, 35 00 

Ohio— $162.98 

Southern District, Congregation 

Fort McKinley, 61 20 

Sunday-school 

Zion 10 53 

Aid Society 

New Carlisle 10 00 

Christian Workers 

Carlisle, 10 00 

Individual 

Edith Riley, 5 00 

Northwestern District, Congregation 

Logan, 35 00 

Individual 

Ephraim Yoder 6 25 

Northeastern District, Individuals 

Millard and Mary Moore, 25 00 

Kansas— $73.21 

Southwestern District, Sunday-school 

Servants of the Master, Larned 35 00 

Christian Workers 

Newton, 5 39 

Individual 



60 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1920 



Mrs. G. J. Blondfield 5 00 

Southeastern District, Congregation 

Osage, 27 82 

Nebraska— $111.65 
Congregation 

South Beatrice, 41 65 

Individual 

Lydia Evans, 70 00 

California — $120.00 

Northern District, Individuals 

Ruth Wilkinson, $8.75; Paul Wilkinson, 

$8.75, 17 50 

Southern District, Christian Workers 

Hemet, $12.50; Pasadena, $90, 102 50 

Colorado— $25.00 

Individual 

Sewell Roger, 25 00 

Maryland— $25.00 

Eastern District, Sunday-school 

Woodberry, 25 00 

Oklahoma— $24.21 

Junior League, Washita, 24 21 

Texas— $15.00 
Sunday-school 

Manvel 15 00 

West Virginia— $10.93 

First District, Sunday-school 

Spruce Run, 10 93 

Montana— $10.00 
Aid Society 

Grandview, 10 00 

Missouri — $35.00 

Southwestern District, Sunday-school 

Carthage, 35 00 

Tennessee— $10.00 
Sunday-school 

Sunshine Band, Boone Creek 10 00 

Iowa — $20.00 

Northern District, Individuals 

W. I. and Katie Buckingham, 20 00 

Canada— $17.50 

Christian Workers' Society 

Irricana, 17 50 

Total for the month, $ 932 64 

Previously reported 4,490 76 

Total to date, $ 5,423 40 

INDIA SHARE PLAN 

Pennsylvania— $290.00 

Western District, Sunday-schools 
Valiant Soldiers' Class, Purchase Line S. 

S., $50; Men's Loyal Bible Class, Rummell 

S. S., $100; Plum Creek, $65, 215 00 

Middle District, Congregation 

Everett, 50 00 

Everett Woman's I. A. B. C, 25 00 

Indiana— $165.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 
Oak Grove, 25 00 

Individuals 
A. Haines, $50; F. E. Foust and Wife, $15, 65 00 

Middle District, Sunday-schools 
Excelsior Class, Huntington, $50; Willing 

Workers, Loon Creek, $25 75 00 

Ohio— $150.00 

Northeastern District, Sunday-schools 

Pollyanna Class, Zion, $50; Beech Grove, 

$50, 100 00 

Northwestern District, Congregation 

Pleasant View 50 00 

Kansas— $162.50 

Southwestern District, Congregation 

Pleasant View i 100 00 

Sunday-school 

Servants of the Master, Larned, $50; Lar- 

ned C. W., $12.50, 62 50 

Colorado— $50.00 

Southeastern District, Individuals 

S. W. and Nellie Detrick 50 00 

North Dakota— $25.00 
Christian Workers, 

Edgeley 25 00 



Washington— $12.50 

Sunday-school 

Soul Savers Class, Outlook, 12 50 

New York— $12.50 
Sunday-school 

Brooklyn 12 50 

Iowa— $12.50 

Southern District, Christian Workers 

South Keokuk 12 50 

Nebraska— $11.00 

Sunday-school 
Kearney 11 00 

Total for the month, $ 891 00 

Previously reported 1,037 50 

Total to date $ 1,928 50 

INDIA WIDOWS' HOME 
Pennsylvania — $5.00 
Eastern District, Individual 

Receipt, No. 46283, 5 00 

Ohio— $10.00 

Northeastern District, Individual 

Receipt, No. 46096, 10 00 

Oklahoma — $2.00 
Individual 

R. R. Front, 2 00 

Total for the month, $ 17 00 

Previously reported, 95 10 

Total to date $ 112 10 

INDIA FAMINE RELIEF 
Virginia— $28.60 
Northern District, Congregation 

Cooks Creek 28 60 

Pennsylvania— $25.00 
Western District, Individuals 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Blough, 25 00 

California— $25.00 

Northern District, Individual 

E. T. Boone 25 00 

Illinois— $5.00 

Northern District, Individual 

Hattie Heckman, 5 00 

Indiana — $10.00 

Northern District, Individual 

D. E. Hoover, 10 00 

Total for the month, $ 93 60 

Previously reported 6,507 70 

Total to date $ 6,601 30 

INDIA HOSPITAL 
Pennsylvania — $5.00 

Eastern District, Individual 
Receipt, No. 46283, 5 00 

Illinois— $1.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 
Shannon 1 00 

Total for the month $ 6 00 

Previously reported, 48 50 

Total to date $ 54 50 

INDIA ORPHANAGE 
Illinois— $40.01 

Northern District, Sunday-schools 

Waddams Grove, $26.80; Elgin, $13.21, .... 40 01 

Indiana — $28.00 
Southern District, Christian Workers 

Pyrmont 28 00 

Pennsylvania— $51.00 

Western District, Congregation 

Sisters, Pittsburgh, 20 00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Second Church of the Brethren 31 00 

Ohio— $32.50 

Northeastern District, Individuals 

Receipt, No. 46094, $10; Receipt, No. 46095, 

$10, 20 00 

Northwestern District, Congregation 

Bellefontaine, 12 50 



February 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



61 



Indiana— $70.00 

Middle District, Sunday-school 

Young Ladies' Class, Burnettsville, 60 00 

Southern District, Individual 

Anna E. Wagoner, 10 00 

Iowa— $5.00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 
South Keokuk, 5 00 

Kansas — $6.25 

Southeastern District, Individual 

Myrtle Campbell 6 25 

Virginia— $2.00 

Southern District, Individual 

Sarah J. Hylton, 2 00 

California— $20.00 

Southern District, Christian Workers 

Los Angeles, 20 00 

Total for the month $ 254 76 

Previously reported, 109 21 

Total to date, $ 363 97 

ANKLESVAR GIRLS' SCHOOL BUILDING 
Maryland— $63.00 

Middle District, Aid Society 

Pleasant View 23 00 

Eastern District, Aid Society 

Pipe Creek 40 00 

Virginia — $22.50 

Second District, Aid Society 

Middle River, 22 50 

Kansas— $25.00 

Northeastern District, Aid Societies 

Societies in Northeastern Kansas, 25 00 

Illinois— $15.00 

Northern District, Aid Society 

Franklin Grove 15 00 

Oklahoma— $6.00 
Aid Society 

Washita, 6 00 

Indiana— $5.00 

Middle District, Aid Society 

Peru 5 00 

Total for the month, $ 136 50 

Previously reported 120 82 

Total to date $ 257 32 

INDIA BOARDING SCHOOL BUILDING 
Illinois — $5.50 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Elgin, 5 50 

Ohio— $2.00 

Northeastern District, Sunday-school 

Good Samaritan Class, Chippewa 2 00 

Oregon— $13.85 
Christian Workers 

Portland, 13 85 

Total for the month, $ 21 35 

QUINTER MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 
Ohio— $5.00 

Northeastern District, Aid Society 

White Cottage 5 00 

California— $5.00 

Southern District, Aid Society 

Covina, 5 00 

Total for the month, $ 10 00 

Previously reported, 586 25 

Total to date, $ 596 25 

CHINA MISSION 
Ohio— $54.22 

Southern District, Congregation 

Eversole 38 22 

Individual 

Edith Riley 5 00 

Northeastern District, Individuals 

Receipt No. 46091, $10; Samuel Lenean, $1, 11 00 

California— $8.00 
Northern District, Individual 

J. Edw. Jarboe, 5 00 



Southern District, Individual 
Mary Underhill 3 00 

Iowa— $15.30 

Northern District, Individuals 

J. H. Grady, 15c; Jerry Wolf, $15.15, .... 15 30 

Indiana — $5.00 
Southern District, Individual 

Mattie Mathews, 5 00 

Wisconsin — $7.98 
Sunday-school 

Rice Lake, 7 98 

Illinois— $4.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

■Shannon, 4 00 

Tennessee — $1.00 
Individual 

Lucy Slogle, 1 00 

Total for the month, $ 95 50 

Previously reported, 917 04 

Total to date $ 1,012 54 

CHINA NATIVE WORKER 
California— $135.00 

Northern District, Individuals 

P. E. Robertson and Wife, $100; W. T. 

Wilkinson and Wife, $20, 120 00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Englewood 15 00 

Indiana — $150.00 

Northern District, Individual 

Mrs. M. B. Stuck, 75 00 

Middle District, Individual 

M. A. Barnhart 75 00 

Ohio— $37.50 

Northeastern District, Sunday-school 

Two Sisters Classes, Akron, 37 50 

Pennsylvania — $5.00 
Middle District, Individual 

Frances Baker, 5 00 

Illinois— $3.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Shannon, 3 00 

Total for the month, $ 330 50 

Previously reported 530 33 

Total to date $ 860 83 

CHINA BOYS' SCHOOL 
Indiana— $102.80 

Northern District, Christian Workers 

Elkhart, 32 80 

Individuals 

Brother and Sister M. B. Stuck and Bro. 
and Sister W. U\ Miller, $60; E. C. Swi- 
hart, $10 70 00 

Wisconsin — $20.00 

Christian Workers 
Chippewa Valley 20 00 

Total for the month, $ 222 80 

Previously reported, 250 20 

Total to date, $ 473 00 

CHINA GIRLS' SCHOOL 
Washington— $25.00 
Individuals 

Susie E. Reber, $10; Jas. Wagoner and 

Wife, $15 25 00 

Montana — $10.00 

Aid Society 

Grand View, 10 00 

Kansas— $8.00 

Western District, Sunday-school 

Maple Grove, 8 00 

Illinois— $1.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Shannon, 1 00 

Total for the month, $ 44 00 

Previously reported, 244 64 

Total to date, $ 388 64 



62 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1920 



PING TING HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 
BUILDING 

Maryland— $52.00 

Eastern District — Aid Societies 

Frederick City, $10; Woodberry, $20, ...\... 30 00 

Middle District, Aid Society 

Pleasant View 22 00 

Kansas — $25.00 

Northeastern District Aid Societies, 25 00 

Virginia— $22.50 

Second District, Aid Society 

Middle River, 22 50 

Illinois— $15.00 

Northern District, Aid Society 

Franklin Grove, 15 00 

Oklahoma — $6.50 
Aid Society 

Washita, 6 50 

Indiana— $5.00 

Middle District, Aid Society 
Peru, 5 00 

Total for the month $ 126 00 

Previously reported, 49 80 

Total to date, $ 175 80 

LIAO CHOU MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 
Illinois— $15.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 
Elgin, 15 00 

Total for the month, $ 15 00 

Previously reported, 154 22 

Total to date $ 169 22 

CHINA ORPHANAGE 
Ohio— $15.00 

Southern District, Individuals 

John H. Rinehart and Wife, j 5 00 

Northeastern District, Individual 

Receipt, No. 46097, 10 00 

Pennsylvania— $31.00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Second Church of the Brethren, York, .. 31 00 

Indiana— $12.50 
Northern District, Sunday-school 

Loyal Class, Middlebury, 12 50 

Michigan— $11.00 

Woodland Aid, 11 00 

Total for the month $ 69 50 

Previously reported, 422 64 

Total to date, $ 592 14 

PING TING HOSPITAL 
Illinois— $115.56 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Primary Department, Hartville, 29 00 

Southern District, Christian Workers 

La Place (Okaw) 86 56 

Indiana — $50.00 

Middle District, Sunday-school 

Willing Workers' Class, Plunge Creek, .. 50 00 

California— $5.00 
Southern District, Aid Society 

Covina 5 00 

Total for the month $ 170 56 

Previously reported, 432 15 

Total to date, $ 602 71 

CHINA HOSPITAL 
Pennsylvania— $5.41 

Eastern District, Sunday-school 

Beginners' Class, Lancaster, 5 41 

Nebraska— -$3.01 
Sunday-school 

South Beatrice, 3 01 

Cuba— $5.00 

Z. L. M., 5 00 

Total for the month, $ 13 42 



Previously reported, 48111 

Total to date, $ 494 53 

SWEDEN MISSION 
Iowa— $20.00 

Northern District, Individuals 

W. I. and Hattie Buckingham, 20 00 

Ohio— $10.00 

Northeastern District, Individual 

Receipt, No. 46099 10 00 

Pennsylvania— $2.00 
Southern District, Individual 

A Sister, 2 00 

Total for the month $ 32 00 

Previously reported, 156 02 

Total to date, $ 188 02 

MALMO BUILDING FUND 
Pennsylvania— $131.00 

Eastern District, Congregation 

Annville 13100 

Iowa— $20.00 

Northern District, Individuals 
W. I. and Hattie Buckingham, 20 00 

Total for the month $ 15100 

Previously reported, 1,575 57 

Total to date, $ 1,726 57 

SWEDISH RELIEF 
Pennsylvania — $5.00 

Eastern District, Individuals 
I. F. Moderia and Wife 5 00 

Total for the month, $ 5 00 

Previously reported 45 00 

Total to date, $ 50 00. 

DNEMARK MISSION 
Ohio— $10.00 

Northeastern District, Individual 
Receipt, No. 46098, 10 00 

Total for the month, $ 10 00 

Previously reported, 5 00 

Total to date $ 15 00 

AFRICA 

Ohio— $10.00 

Northeastern District, Individual 
Receipt No. 46100, 10 00 

Total for the month, $ 10 00 

Previously reported, 5 00 

Total to date $ 15 00 

CONFERENCE OFFERING FOR DECEMBER 
Ohio— $625.00 

Northeastern District, Congregations 

Sugar Creek, $50; New Philadelphia, $20; 

Owl Creek, $100; Fredericksburg, $50, $ 220 00 

Aid Society 

Homeworth, 50 00 

Individual 

Sherman Mohler, 5 00 

Northwestern District, Congregations 

Woodworth, $50; Silver Creek, $50, 100 00 

Aid Society 

Silver Creek, 25 00 

Individual 

David Lytle, 101 00 

Southern District, Congregations 

New Carlisle, $110; Oakland, $14 124 00 

Indiana— $892.05 

Northern District, Congregations 

West Goshen, $100; Rock Run, $5; Bethel, 
$100; Goshen City, $7.30; New Salem, $50, .. 262 30 
Individuals 

Chas. E. Cripe, $10; Jesse A. Eisenhoun, 

$13; Annetta Johnson, $21.75, 44 75 

Middle District, Congregations 

Huntington, $50; Manchester, $150; Flora, 
$100; West Manchester, $100, • 400 00 



February 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



63 



Aid Society 

Andrews, 50 00 

Southern District, Congregation 

Mississinewa, .... 100 00 

Aid Society 

Anderson 10 00 

Sunday-school 

Shining Star Class, White Branch, 25 00 

Pennsylvania— $1,171 .09 

Middle District, Congregations 

Tyrone, $52; Everett, $50; Woodbury, 

$50 152 00 

Individuals 

M. J. Weaver, $20; W. M. Ulrich, $10, ... 30 00 

Eastern District, Individual 

Levi C. Zigler, 100 00 

Southern District, Congregations 

Carlisle, $50; Antietam, $103.34, 153 34 

Sunday-school 

Shanks (Black Creek Cong.) 35 75 

Western District, Congregations 

Middle Creek, $100; Pittsburgh, $100; 

Viewmont, $100, 300 00 

Individuals 

Mr. and Mrs. N. H. Blough, ... # 100 00 

Southeastern District, Congregations 

First Church, Philadelphia, $100; Green 
Tree, $100; Germantown, $100, 300-00 

Illinois— $566.48 

Northern District, Congregations 

Elgin, $50; Franklin Grove, $50; Lanark, 

$100 200 00 

Sunday-school 

Waddams Grove 15 00 

Individuals 

A. L. Rainey and Wife, 2 00 

Southern District, Congregations 

Woodland, $97.75; Oakley, $100; Polo, 

$51.73, 249 48 

Individual 

John S. Swartz 100 00 

Maryland— $491.76 

Middle District, Congregations 

Beaver Creek, $106.76; Pleasant View, 

$285; Denton, $100 491 76 

Virginia— $300.00 

First District, Congregation 

Peters Creek, 50 00 

Individual 

John W. Layman, 100 00 

Second District, Congregation 

Bridgewater 150 00 

Kansas— $150.00 

Northeastern District, Sunday-school 

Sabetha 100 00 

Northwestern District, Individual 

Lester E. Williams 50 00 

Iowa— $200.00 

Northern District, Congregation 

South Waterloo, 100 00 

Middle District, Congregation 

Coon River 100 00 

Nebraska— $129.30 
Congregation 

South Beatrice 100 00 

Christian Workers 

South Beatrice 29 30 

Idaho— $100.00 
Congregation 

Nezperce, 100 00 

Missouri— $100.00 

Middle District, Congregation 

Adrian, 50 00 

Southern District, Individual 

D. W. Teeter 50 00 

Colorado— $50.00 

Northeastern District, Individual 
Mrs. S. J. Nickey, 50 00 

California— $42.00 

Southern District, Congregation 
La Verne, 42 00 

Florida— $50.00 

Congregation 
Sebring 50 00 

Total for the month $ 4,867 68 



Previously reported 131,578 82 

Total to date, $136,446 50 

RELIEF AND RECONSTRUCTION 
COMMITTEE'S REPORT 

The $500.00 credited to Waynesboro Church of An- 
tietam Congregation, should have been credited to 
Antietam Congregation. 

ARMENIAN AND SYRIAN RELIEF 
California 

Egan Cong., $30; Nancy D. Underhill, Po- 
mona, $2.50; O. S. Gilbert and family, Em- 
pire, $25, $ 57 50 

Canada 

Redcliff Mission, Pleasant Valley Cong., 9 53 

Idaho 

Bowmont Church, 66 30 

Illinois 

Woodland Cong., $113.50; Anna L. Fry, 
Wheaton, $5; Oak Grove Cong., $6.50; Polo 
Church, $42; Batavia S. S., $5; John Heck- 
man, Polo, $10; Douglas Park Mission, 
Chicago, $10; Offering given at Union 
Services of Liberty Churches, $9.50; Loyal 
Banner Class, of West Branch S. S., $10; 

Lanark Church, $301 512 50 

Indiana 

Pipe Creek Church, $21.50; Mexico Cong., 
$20; Offering given at Union Services of 
Bremen churches, $39.12; Robert Cripe, 
North Manchester, $1.25; Keith Cripe, 
North Manchester, $1.06; Young Peoples' 
Class, Maple Grove S. S., $5; A Brother, 
Summitville Cong., $10; North Liberty 
Cong., $107; Maple Grove Church, $13; 
Pleasant View Church, $8.60; Andrews Ch., 
$32.50; Rossville S. S., $10.77; Tippecanoe 
S. S., $25; Upper Deer Creek Church, $11; 
Alice King Bible Class, North Manchester, 
$40; Mrs. M. J. Ratcliff, Montpelier, $20; 
Mrs. Lottie E. Hummel, So. Whitley, $2; 
Flora Church, $46.50; Little Gleaners' Class, 
Yellow Creek S. S., $18.40; Yellow Creek 
Cong., $11.93; Christmas offering, Berean 
S. S. Class, Nappanee S. S., $19.50; Floyd 
McGuire, $7.50; Mr. and Mrs. Everett Dru- 
ley, Richmond, $10; Plymouth S. S., $15; 
West Manchester Church, $25; Elkhart 

City Church, $28 549 63 

Iowa 

Grundy County Church, $20; W. I. and 
Katie Buckingham, Hampton, $20; South 
English Church, $42.52; A Friend, Marshall- 
town, $1; Nellie Myer's Class, Panther 
Creek S. S., $41.50; Seekers of Truth S. S. 
Class, South Waterloo, $13; Des Moines 
Valley Church, $13.45; Franklin S. S., $5. .. 156 47 
Kansas 

L. A. Phillips and wife, Emporia, $6; Rock 
Creek Ladies' Aid, $60; Mrs. W. H. En- 
triken, Abilene, $5; A Sister, Garden City, 

$3; Morrill S. S., $17 9100 

Maryland 

Monocacy Church, $40; R. W. Gross- 
nickel and family, Myersville, $6, 46 00 

Michigan 

S. White, Dimondale, $17; Morris Weisel, 
Battle Creek, $5; Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Sel- 
lers, Onekama, $10; Zion Church, Prescott, 
$10.79; A Sister, Nashville, $5; Main 
Collection, Grand Rapids S. S., $22.75; Har- 
vesters' Class, Grand Rapids S. S., $10; 
Onward Class, Grand Rapids, $5; Primary 
Dept., Grand Rapids, $11.55; The Boys' 
" Bound to Win " Class, Grand Rapids 

S. S., $7; Grand Rapids Cong., $5, 109 09 

Minnesota 

Ever Ready S. S. Class, Worthington, 
$30; Hancock Cong., $22; Christian Work- 
ers' Society, Worthington, $5; Deer Park 

Church, $7.91, 64 91 

Missouri 

Mrs. F. J. Weckman, Plattsburg, 4 00 

Nebraska 

Af ton Church, Cambridge 95 50 



64 



The Missionary Visitor 



1920 
February 



North Dakota 

A. P. Sommers, Mercer, 5 00 

Ohio 

West Nimishillen S. S., $23; New Carlisle 
Church, $452; West Charleston Cong., 
$38.26; Helpers* and Young Mens' Classes, 
Wooster Church, $5; Mr. and Mrs. A. C. 
Buchwalter, Weilersville, $5; Hickory 
Grove S. S., Silver Creek Church, $13.60; 
Logan Church, $200; Mr. and Mrs. N. A. 
Schrock, Baltic, $50; P. F. Dukes and wife, 
Greenspring, $15; Brookville Church, $17.35; 
Jordan S. S., Ft. Recovery, $5; Elizabeth 
Toms, Bellville, $10; Lower Stillwater Ch., 
$44.73; Painter Creek Church, $25 903 94 

Oregon mM „„ 

Newberg S. S. f $67.55; Mabel S. S. $40, ... 107 55 

Pennsylvania 

Always Willing S. S. Class, Waynesboro, 
$120; Hanover Church, $4.78; Riddlesburg 
Church, $8.50; Antietam Cong., $194.77; Elk 
Lick Cong., $108; Mrs. Martha F. Hol- 
linger, Abbottstown, $2; Simon P. Steele, 
Yellow Creek Church, $10.25; Middle Creek 
Cong., $30; Myerstown Sisters' Aid Society, 
Tulpehocken Church, $10; Paxton S. S., Big 
Swatara Church, $62; J. C. Ankeny and 
wife, Ligonier, $10; J. B. Asper and family, 
Mechanicsburg, $5; Huntsdale Ch., $58.81; 

Beachdale Church, $45, 659 « 

West Virginia 

John W. and Elva May Hevener, Hos- 
terman 

hT'f? Sours, Luray, $5; Roy Gibson, 
Daleville, $2; Bethlehem Cong., $40; Middle 
River Cong., 2nd Dist., $23.01; J. J. Con- 
nor, Manassas, $7.40; Hines S. S., Headwa- 
ters, $18.37; Thanksgiving Offering, Clover- 
dale Church, $90.25; Sisters' Aid Society, 

Manassas Cong., $10, ^ 03 

Washington ___ 

Seattle Cong., $12.39; East Wenatchee 
S. S., $488.60; Wenatchee S. S., $39.10, 540 09 

Total for month of December $ 4,194 93 

FRENCH ORPHANS' RELIEF FUND 

Illinois ion/: 

Nautilus Class, Elgin, l» ™ 

Nebraska ., nn 

Invale School 56 °° 

Total for month of December, $ 74 96 

BELGIAN RELIEF FUND 

°s[ a S. Class of Garrison Church, $12; W. 
I. and Katie Buckingham, Hampton, $20, . . 6& UU 

Missouri . . 7 „ 

Junior Girls' Class, Rockingham S. S., 7 H 

Total for month of December, $ 39 32 

JEWISH RELIEF FUND 
Maryland 

Denton Cong 150 00 

Pennsylvania 

Chickies S. S., $5; Chickies Ch., $112.75,.. 117 75 

Total for month of December, $ 267 75 

SERBIAN RELIEF FUND 
Illinois 

Elgin Brethren S. S., 15 01 

Total for month of December, $ 15 01 

LEAVING HOME AND FATHER 

(Continued from Page 56) 

Even so tremulous and weak. 

He often cleared his throat, for those 

Few words of Paul which he had chose, 



Spoke well the words of love so true 

And had for us a meaning new. 

He closed the Book and called on me, 

As we knelt in humility, 

To pray that morning prayer with them, 

That they with tears might say amen. 

I faltered oft, but faltering cry 

From love-torn hearts will mount on high 

And bring sweet peace — and peace we felt 

As there with aching hearts we knelt. 

We rose and took our morning meal, 

But mutual touch had put a seal 

Upon our lips, and silently 

We ate our bread. And through the day 

An aching spot within my heart 

Oft made the salty teardrops start, 

But as they came I blinked them down, 

Gulping hard, as I went to town 

To take our trunks and bags away, 

For the train would go at the close of day. 

When I returned, dear father was there 

To help with the horses and their care. 

We put them up and did the work — 

The slightest duties we did not shirk, 

Till all the evening's work was done 

And the light had fled with the evening sun. 

The supper was eaten with scarcely a word; 

All things were' ready, yet no one stirred. 

Then George, with tones as composed as 

he could, 
Sang a beautiful song which did us good. 
He sang of a parting which loves never 

quell, 
To the tune of that song that " all will be 

well." 
Then silently we rose to depart, 
While the strong cords of love still tugged 

at our heart. 
We were ready to go, so I took his hand — 
A hand I'd not trade for all in the land; 
With sobs in his voice and tears in his 

eyes, 
With hands all atremble and heart full of 

sighs 
He said but five words, but words full of 

joy, 
Those five precious words, " God bless you, 

my boy." 
I kissed him twice — those kisses of love 
Were sweet as the dew from heaven above. 
We held to each other a moment — no 

more — 
But I knew him better than ever before. 
He went on before us to open the gate, 
That we in our going might not be late; 
He opened the gate and stood aside, 
While we passed out to launch on the tide, 
And then he stood there watching us go , 
Out in the world so full of woe. 
But this I know, and come what may: 
There's a father's love awaiting the day 
When I and my love come home again. 
When we come home, be it loss or gain, 
There's a father's love to open the gate — 
Whether it's early or whether it's late — 
He still stands there and longing yearns 
To have us come to the heart that burns. 



GENERAL MISSIOIN BOARD 



ITS MEMBERSHIP 



D. L. MILLER, Mt. Morris, 111., Life Advis- 
ory Member. 
H. C. EARLY, Penn Laird, Va. 
J. J. YODER, McPherson, Kansas. 



CHARLES D. BONSACK, New Windsor, Md. 
OTHO WINGER, North Manchester, Ind. 
A. P. BLOUGH, Waterloo, Iowa. 



ITS ORGANIZATION 



H. C. EARLY, President. 

OTHO WINGER, Vice-President. 



J. H. B. Williams, Secretary-Treasurer. 
Editor, The Visitor. 



All correspondence for the Board should be addressed to Elgin, Illinois 



ITS FORCE OF FOREIGN WORKERS 



DENMARK 

Glasmire, W. E. 
Glasmire, Leah S. 



SWEDEN 

Friisgatan No. 1, 
Malmb, Sweden 
Buckingham, Ida 
Graybill, J. F. 
Graybill, Alice M. 



CHINA 

Ping Ting Hsien, 
Shansi, China 

Bowman, Samuel B. 

Bowman, Pearl S. 

Bright, J. Homer 

Bright, Minnie F. 

Crumpacker, F. H. 

Crumpacker, Anna M. 

Flory, Edna R. 

Horning, Emma 

Metzger, Minerva 

Rider, Bessie M. 

Vaniman, Ernest D. 

Vaniman, Susie C. 

Wampler, Dr. Fred J. 

Wampler, Rebecca C. 

North China 
Language School, 
Pekin, China 

Horning, Dr. D. L. 
Horning, Martha Daggett 
Miller, Valley 
Myers, Minor M. 
Myers, Elizabeth Z. 
Sollenberger, O. C. 
Sollenberger, Hazel Cop- 
pock 
Ullom, Lulu 

Liao Chou, Shansi, China 
Brubaker, Dr. O. G. 
Brubaker, Cora M. 
Cripe, Winnie E. 
Flory, Raymond C. 
Flory, Lizzie N. 
Hutchison, Anna 
Oberholtzer, I. E. 
Oberholtzer, Elizabeth W. 
Pollock, Myrtle 
Seese, Norman R. 



Seese, Anna 
Senger, Nettie M. 
Shock, Laura J. 
Wampler, Ernest M. 
Wampler, Vida M. 

Shou Yang, Shansi, China 

Clapper, V. Grace 
Flory, Byron M. 
Flory, Nora 
Heisey, Walter J. 
Heisey, Sue R. 
Schaeffer, Mary 

On Furlough 

Blough, Anna V., 266 
Hammond Ave., Wa- 
terloo, la. 



INDIA 

Ahwa, Dangs Forest, 
via Bilimora, India 

Ebey, Adam 
Ebey, Alice K. 

Anklesvar, Broach Dist., 
India 

Hoffert, A. T. 
Miller, Eliza B. 
Mow, Anetta 
Stover, W. B. 
Stover, Mary E. 
Ziegler, Kathryn 

Bulsar, Surat Dist., India 

Blickenstaff, Verna M. 
Brown, Nettie P. 
Brumbaugh, Anna B. 
Butterbaugh, Andrew G. 
Butterbaugh, Bertha Leh- 
man 
Cottrell, Dr. A. R. 
Cottrell, Dr. Laura M. 
Eby, E. H. 
Eby, Emma H. 
Holsopple, Q. A. 
Holsopple, Kathren R. 
Hollenberg, Frederick M. 
Hollenberg, Nora Reber 
Kintner, Elizabeth 
Miller, A. S. B. 
Miller, Jennie B. 
Miller, Sadie J. 
Mohler, Jennie 
Replogle, Sara G. 



Ross, A. W. 
Ross, Flora N. 
Shull, Chalmer G. 
Shull, Mary S. 
Summer, Benjamin F. 
Wagoner, J. Elmer 
Wagoner, Ellen Heckman 

Dahanu, Thana Dist., India 

Alley, Howard I. 
Alley, Hattie Z. 
Ebbert, Ella 
Lichty, D. J. 
Nickey, Dr. Barbara M. 
Pittenger, J. M. 
Pittenger, Florence B. 
Royer, B. Mary 
Swartz, Goldie 

Jalalpor, Surat Dist., India 

Forney, D. L. 
Forney, Anna M. 
Grisso, Lillian 
Shumaker, Ida C. 

Vada, Thana Dist., India 

Garner, H. P. 
Garner, Kathryn B. 
Powell, Josephine 

Anklesvar, India 
Post: Umalla, via 

Arnold, S. Ira 
Arnold, Elizabeth 
Himmelsbaugh, Ida 

Vyara, via Surat, India 

Long, I. S. 
Long, Erne V. 

On Furlough 

Blough, J. M., Hunting 

don, Pa. 
Blough, Anna Z., Hunt 

ingdon, Pa. 
Eby, Anna M., Trotwood 

Ohio 
Emmert, Jesse B., Hunt 

ingdon, Pa. 
Emmert, Gertrude R. 

Huntingdon, Pa. 
Kaylor, John I., La Verne 

Calif. 
Widdowson, Olive, Hunt 

ingdon, Pa. 



Please Notice— Postage on letters to our missionaries is 5c for each ounce or fraction 
thereof and 3c for each additional ounce or fraction. 



*. — •__ 



To take a trip through our China Mission Fields — by securing 

China— A Challenge to the Church 

Ready to mail 

Edited by Isaiah E. Oberholtzer, Norman A. Seese, Walter J. Heisey 

Latest and most complete information from our China Mission 

Full of facts and pictures which the church — the base of supply 
for funds — will want to know and see. 115 pages covering 14 distinct 
phases of the work. Sent postpaid, 50c. 



C 

Also make a similar trip through Our India Mission by reading 

A Year with Our Missionaries 

in India 

The Annual India Report concealed in Story Form 

Written by W. B. Stover, Pioneer Missionary to India 

William Weston and his good wife Mary take a trip from Penn- 
sylvania to visit the India Mission. What they see at the different 
stations causes them to marvel at the progress of the work and in- 
cidentally they give us the facts for the year's work. The story car- 
ries the interest throughout. Sent postpaid, 15c. 

COMBINATION OFFER NO. I 

China — A Challenge to the Church, $ .50 

A Year With Our Missionaries in India, 15 

Map of Our India Mission (paper), 15 

Missionary Programs, .35 

Total, $1.15 

These four items will be sent postpaid upon receipt of $1.00 

Note: If cloth map of India is desired add 25c more to the order 

Address these orders to 

GENERAL MISSION BOARD, Elgin, 111. 



THE MISSIONARY 




Church of the 'Brethren 



Vol. XXII 



MARCH, 1920 



No. 3 






A Message From Our Forward Movement Director 

EARLY two thousand years ago there spake 
to a little group of men in the mountains of Gali- 
lee One who said, "All power is given unto me, in 
heaven and on earth." Upon this marvelous claim 
he asked that in all nations we should make dis- 
ciples of him and that they be taught to observe 
all things commanded by him, assuring his presence to 
the ends of the earth. The fact of the crucifixion, burial, resurrection 
and ascension, amidst which this wonderful claim was made, justifies 
our faith in him as Lord and Christ. 

Now. since all other remedies for the world's ills have been tried 
and failed, why should we not, at any cost, with faith in him, give this 
unfailing power to heal the broken and restless lives of men of every 
nation and tongue? The whole Gospel for the whole world. This is 
the task of the church to which our Forward Movement is dedicated. 
Lord, may we go forward, only with thee! 




0£^^r^>-^^^- 



♦ 

The Missionary Visitor 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN 
THROUGH HER GENERAL MISSION BOARD 



Subscription Terms 



THE SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IS FIFTY CENTS PER YEAR 

The subscription price is included in EACH donation of a dollar or more to the Gen- 
eral Mission Board, either direct or through any congregational collection, provided the 
dollar or more is given by one individual and in no way combined with another's gift. 
Different members of the same family may each give a dollar or more, and extra sub- 
scriptions, thus secured, may upon request be sent to persons who they know will be in- 
terested in reading the Visitor. 

Kindly notice, however, that these subscription terms do not include a subscription for 
every dollar donation, but a subscription for each donation of one dollar or more, no matter 
how large the donation. 

Ministers. In consideration of their services to the church, influence in assisting the 
Committee to raise missionary money, and upon their request annually, the Visitor will 
be sent to ministers of the Church of the Brethren. 

Foreign postage, 15 cents additional to all foreign countries, including Canada. Sub- 
scriptions discontinued at expiration of time. 

To insure delivery of paper, prompt notice of change of address should be given. When 
asking change of address give old address as well as new. Please order paper each year 
if possible under same name as in the previous year. 

Address all communications regarding subscriptions and make remittances payable to 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, ILLINOIS 

Entered as second class matter at the postoffice of Elgin, Illinois. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, Act of 
October 3, 1917, authorized Aug. 20, 1918. 



Contents for March, 1920 

EDITORIALS, 65 

Our Missions and the Forward Movement, ... 68 

ESSAYS— 

Some Experiences of the Day, By Ida C. Shumaker, . . 69 

That Man of Macedonia: Who Was He? By E. F. Sherfy, 72 

Opportunities for Work Among Women of Depressed Classes, By 
Laura M. Cottrell, M. D., 7 J 

What if These Sixty Million Become Arya Samaj? By E. H. Eby, 75 

The Awakening of the Outcastes of India, By A. W. Ross, 76 

Our First Christmas in China, By Sara Zigler Myers, 80 

China Notes for December, By V. Grace Clapper, 82 

India Notes for December, By Ida C. Shumaker, . 83 

THE WORKERS' CORNER— 

Mission Study for Juniors, By Mrs. Silvia M. Beckner, 85 

Programs of a Mission Study Class, 87 

Middle Creek's Mission Study Class, By W. J. Hamilton 88 

The Voice at the Turn of the Road (Poem) 88 

FINANCIAL REPORT, W 



Volume XXII 



MARCH, 1920 



Xo. 3 



EDITORIALS 



" If we walk in the light, as he is in the 
light, we have fellowship one with another 
and the blood of Jesus his Son cleanseth 
us from all sin." But if we walk in dark- 
ness we sever our relationship with God 
and are lost in the maze of selfishness, sin 
and dangerous pitfalls. 



But how pursuing is the love of God 
for his children! By night he goes into 
the mountains, he searches them out, ever 
vigilant and watchful. His great eye runs 
to and fro throughout the whole earth. 
Those in the swamps of paganism may find 
him there; those in morasses of doubt 
may look and behold he is there; those 
on their self-exalted heights of skepticism 
will find him there. He who is perfect in 
love, with whom wisdom of men is fool- 
ishness, fears not, neither is he weary. He 
seeks to save; he saves unto the uttermost. 

"We Jcnow that we have passed out of 
death unto life because we love the breth- 
ren." Herein is the secret of knowing that 
we are God's children. When we see that 
one who is selfishly interested in himself, 
his children, his own, to the exclusion of 
those good souls who have been more 
unfortunate than himself, we do not won- 
der that such Christians just " hope " or 
" think " that they are in the " life " of 
God. 



The only doctrine of avoidance that the 
Christian dare to practice is to avoid every 
questionable practice and to abstain from 
all appearance of evil. 

Our missionaries just now are sailing, sail- 
ing, sailing on. Our first part}'-, sailing by 
the Atlantic, reached India in safety and on 
time; the second party, sailing Jan. 10 from 
Seattle, are doubtless not far from India 



as these lines are read. We suspect that 
the third party, sailing Jan. 27, are just 
about clearing for India from Hong Kong. 
It is hoped that we have sent our last 
party by way of the Pacific, but no one 
can tell in these days of unsettled condi- 
tions of ocean traffic. 

Annual Conference at Sedalia will likely 
greet a number of missionaries at home 
on furlough. Who these will be can hardly 
be told as yet. The last we have heard 
from Bro. Stovers, of India, and Dr. Bru- 
bakers, of China, is that they may be un- 
able to secure sailing in time to get here 
by June. We hope to greet Sister Buck- 
ingham, of Sweden, Drs Cottrell, of India, 
and perhaps a few more. 



Bro. A. J. Culler, who went out to Ar- 
menia in March, 1919, to serve for the Re- 
lief and Reconstruction Committee, is 
again at home, at McPherson, Kans., with 
his wife and babies. It had been hoped that 
work might be started independently by 
our church, to use the money which was 
so generously given in the campaign for 
relief last spring; but circumstances, which 
have been explained, made this impossible. 
Bro. Culler was engaged at Marash, in Syr- 
ia, organizing the work under the Ameri- 
can Committee for Relief in the Near East, 
and was so efficient as to merit the very 
hearty endorsement and commendation of 
that committee. 

)))/^ /■ 

The Missionary Manual of the General 
Mission Board has been revised recently 
and is just off the press. A copy of this 
sixty-four-page booklet will be sent to any- 
one who is especially interested in the 
rules and regulations under which our mis- 
sionaries labor. 



BRIDGEWATER COLLEGE LIBRARY 
BRIDGEWATER, VIRGINIA 



66 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1920 



There are more Italians in New York 
City than there are in Rome, and more 
Jews than there are in Jerusalem. Thirty- 
two languages, besides our own, are spok- 
en by the peoples of two boroughs of New 
York City— Manhattan and the Bronx. New 
York City is one of the " foreign " fields of 
the world. 

The negro population of the United 
States is about 10,000,000 and of these 
about 40 per cent are members of Protest- 
ant churches. There are approximately 
300,000 Indians and 400,000 Mexicans in 
our poulation. These constitute a home 
mission problem to which the Church of 
the Brethren owes careful consideration. 



Are you praying these days for the com- 
ing of the Spirit into your life? A good 
brother said not long ago that it was just 
"money, money, money." That is the 
way it strikes the writer, also, and he has 
much sympathy for the dear old brother. 
The butcher, the baker, the grocer, the 
milkman, all work as faithfully and unceas- 
ingly for our " financial " undoing as do the 
water meter and the gas meter and the 
electric meter in our basement. We dis- 
like their bills, but we would not do with- 
out the necessities which they bring. 
Our magazines and our books . and 
our children, too, are expensive, but we 
pay for them and enjoy their society. Is 
it a. tragedy that they cost us something? 
No, indeed, we love them because they 
have cost us money. 



But the rapidly-shrinking dollar has 
brought home to us the fact that the work 
of the Lord also costs us money. We must 
pay, that others may have the same bless- 
ings that we enjoy. And, indeed, we must 
pay for these blessings to others, else the 
blessings that we enjoy would become 
apples of Sodom to us. We thank God 
and take courage that our gifts to him 
bring such enjoyment. 



You know the Irishman said that he 
wished he and his brother were the only 
people in the world; his brother would 
sell land and he himself would keep store. 
He had a financial brain, but he forgot 



the outlet for his products. We make 
money because of our fellow-men. Likewise 
we enjoy life because of them, and we en- 
joy it most abundantly when they have 
comforts and peace and happiness. He 
who gives, lives. He who loves most, 
gives most. He in whose breast love dies 
is the one whose sympathy dries. The 
wellsprings of our greatest joy may be lo- 
cated in that orphanage or that hospital 
across the sea, in that neglected valley or 
prairie or city of our own country. 



But our good brother who thinks the cry 
for money never ceases has a bit of argu- 
ment in his clarion call to the almighty 
dollar. We do not pray enough over the 
money which we give. A dollar is a dollar, 
to be sure, but we believe that the dollar 
which goes into the till of the Lord goes 
farthest when its farewell is taken amid 
fervent prayer. Perhaps we would not 
miss the dollars that go quite so much 
if we prayed more to the Father. 

What is the greatest need of the world at 
this time, do you ask? Money? No, it is 
not money. The greatest ache of the hu- 
man heart can be healed only through an 
increased spirit of intercessory prayer. 
The world forgets to pray. Money and its 
gift to the Lord is only an effect; we do 
not stop in our mad rush for it to take 
account of the living, vital, joyful presence 
of God in our lives. Have you talked with 
him today? Pray, be instant in season, in 
everything give thanks. 



What is the greatest need of the Church 
of the Brethren? Money? No, we have 
plenty of that; God knows it. Churches? 
No, we have commodious churchhouses. 
Principles for action? No, we have the 
principles of the ages. Good homes? No, 
we have good homes and our families are 
well supplied with those things which com- 
fort and satisfy. What we need is 20,000 
family altars, around which can cluster in 
devotion and gratitude every member of 
the Church of the Brethren, our children, 
and the stranger within our gates. Our 
church is here today largely because ot 
the family altars of our fathers. What of 
the morrow! 



March 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



67 



We regret with our missionaries to learn 
of the death of Mr. Maynard D. Howell, 
export manager for Montgomery Ward & 
Co., who died on steamship Dec. 2 while 
en route from Vancouver to Yokohama. 
Mr. Howell was the originator of the Mis- 
sionary Bureau of Montgomery Ward & 
Co.'s foreign department, and through him 
the blessings of American products had 
found their way into the homes of most of 
our own missionaries, with thousands of 
others on the field. Mr. Howell took 
special interest in supplying the needs of 
missionaries. We know from experience 
that he would put himself out to serve 
them. It is a blessing in our American 
business world that there are such men 
who put their hearts in their business and 
serve their fellow-men in such a manner. 
Mr. Howell's death will be mourned by 
our missionaries. 



It was our intention, in the February is- 
sue, to make editorial mention of the bi- 
ographies of some of the church's best, 
which appeared in that number. Our minds 
return to the Winona Conference when 
the great body assembled there bade our 
missionaries Godspeed. All of these work- 
ers have eagerly waited from that time to 
get off to India. Finally they were started 
in three parties. 



The first of these sailed from New York 
City in November and reached India very 
promptly, having been able to sail on a 
vessel direct for Bombay. These are now 
busy at their tasks. Sisters Kintner and 
Replogle are studying the language, Bro. 
Lichty has been assigned by the India 
Field Committee to work at Anklesvar, 
while Bro. Holsopples are returned to 
their station at Vali, whence they had 
come to America. 



The other two parties, as has been not- 
ed, sailed from Seattle and should reach 
India, if no serious delays are encountered, 
during the month of March. That they 
will find the missionaries eager to greet 
them is proved by the statement from a 
recent India letter, which said the mission 
was thrown into excitement when the tel- 
egram came from the Lichty party, say- 
ing they were nearing Bombay. 



We believe that the missionaries this 
year, in such unusual numbers, are the 
direct answer to the prayers of the church 
for our mission fields, and especially for 
India, where they are so hard pressed for 
workers. What relief these will bring! 
What a work they will find inaugurated! 
And how India wishes that these all had 
the language to begin work at once! 

The prayers of the church, and her best 
wishes, too, are with these who have 
sailed. She is behind them with her sym- 
pathy and her resources. She desires 
them to work with their greatest degree 
of efficiency for the evangelization of In- 
dia. And with this desire are her spirit of 
intercession to the Father in their behalf 
and her gifts which pour into the Lord's 
treasury. May the Father bless each work- 
er we know is the prayer which arose in 
every heart as the biographies in the Feb- 
ruary number were read. 



There are doubtless a number of splendid 
books on temperance in various libraries 
of our Brethren that are not being used 
at this time. If any one has such and will 
send them to us at Elgin, or better yet, 
send them direct to Bro. A. T. Hoffert, Bul- 
sar, Surat Dist., India, they will be put to 
splendid use in furthering this most worthy 
cause in that land. Bro. Hoffert is tem- 
perance secretary of our mission. Thanks 
in advance for any such books you may be 
willing to part with. 

J8 J* 

Look upward; think upward; strive up- 
ward; live upward. 

A fifth-rate something is .better than a 
first-rate nothing. 

With malice toward none, with charity 
for all, with firmness in the right, as God 
gives us to see the right, let us strive to 
finish the work we are in. — Abraham Lin- 
coln. ^8 j? 

Don't get discouraged. It is often the 
last key on the bunch that opens the lock. 

Being everlastingly on the job beats car- 
rying a rabbit's foot for luck. 

Things turn up for the man who digs. 



68 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1920 



Our Missions and the Forward Movement 



The Editor 



Our brethren have been very well in- 
formed through the columns of the Mes- 
senger regarding the recent developments 
of the Forward Movement; how a Joint 
Board Meeting has been held in Elgin; 
how the colleges have likewise had their 
representatives in conference, a step 
which has never before been taken in our 
church; and finally how efforts are now 
being made to organize the Brotherhood, 
through the helpful cooperation of faith- 
ful brethren everywhere ; and that Bro. 
Charles D. Bonsack, a member of the Gen- 
eral Mission Board, has been chosen as 
General Director of the Movement. 

It was inevitable that some such step as 
this should be taken at this time; some 
have felt that it should have been done 
before. One year of our Forward Move- 
ment has passed and its records are his- 
tory. Some have asked what has been ac- 
complished; some have expressed doubts 
whether anything has been done; and 
once in a while we hear the echo, " Why 
was such agitation ever started? — for we 
preferred to go along as we have always 
done." Our only reply to these questions 
and doubts is that it was inevitable that 
our first year of a Forward Movement 
should be something of a year like we 
have had. Our folks do not accept things 
hastily; no new thing finds ready accept- 
ance with us; it must prove itself. This 
first year has borne a very keen relation 
to the years that are to follow in the 
Movement; without its agency the Move- 
ment would have been spoiled in the be- 
ginning. Our people had to learn what 
such a Movement meant ; they have been 
learning it throughout the year, for in 
most of the churches of the Brotherhood 
(and possibly at all District Meetings, and 
at last Annual Conference) sermons have 
been preached and addresses given on the 
purport of this great Movement. Not ac- 
cepting things rashly, this Movement has 
had to be introduced to our brethren, and 
it has been done, thanks to our loyal min- 
istry and other workers. Indeed, it seems 
to have been so well done in many places 
that some of the goals which were intend- 



ed to prove as a basis for a five-year aver- 
age have been passed in the year which is 
now about to a close. 

We have had some very concrete lessons 
to learn as committees, boards and other 
organizations (and many yet are not 
known by all) who represent the Brother- 
hood, before we could get very far on such 
a splendid Movement as this one. We 
have never learned just how to cooperate 
with each other. Our General Boards have 
their place; forty-seven District Mission 
Boards are laws unto themselves in their 
territories; our various schools have their 
own territories, largely, and organize their 
campaigns quite independently of all oth- 
ers. There has not been a common bond, 
excepting of love, to unite our interests. 

Then, too, we have never learned the ad- 
vantages of making budgets. We have 
spent what we received, and we have in in- 
creasing numbers begun to ask for what 
we meant to spend for the Lord's work 
and to tell beforehand where we meant for 
it to go. But we had never thought of 
making up a combined budget to present 
to our whole church until the leaven of the 
Forward Movement had a year for its 
work; and now we see the necessity and 
wisdom for such a thing. 

As these lines are written the Brother- 
hood is being organized for a combined 
appeal to our good people in behalf of 
funds for education, District and general 
missions, Sunday-school and young peo- 
ple's work, and support for aged ministers 
and missionaries. We believe that the rea- 
sons for this will appeal to our people. 
They often weary of so many general of- 
ferings and financial requests at different 
times of the year. It is hoped that the 
amount which will be asked for this spring 
will cover the needs for the year, for our 
varipus lines of activity, excepting, per- 
chance, the endowment campaigns and ap- 
peals for college buildings and equipment, 
which may not be covered. But a more 
extended announcement of the financial 
side of our Forward Movement will be 
made at a later date. 

The likelihood is that too many of us 






March 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



69 



have acted and thought of the Forward 
Movement too much as a financial cam- 
paign. While finances must necessarily 
enter in, they are not the big thing. The 
revival of spiritual interest among our 
membership, the awakening of a keener 
sense of stewardship, the call for a suf- 
ficient number of men to care for our 
churches, the saving of souls for Jesus 
Christ — these are really the big things of 
the whole Movement. Gifts of gold can- 
not recompense or atone for an indiffer- 
ent spirit. 

We believe also that a very direct result 
of the united spirit in this Movement will 
be a new realization by all of us, that unit- 
edly we can accomplish most wonderful 
results for Jesus Christ. Dare we prophesy 



that through this Movement there will 
come hope to discouraged churches, new 
life to those churches that seem to be de- 
clining and a new anxiety for the unsaved 
round about us? This can happen if we 
pull together in the Movement. Sanctioned 
as it has been by Annual Conference, mak- 
ing for a Greater Church of the Brethren 
as it resolutely is, aiming at an extension 
of the kingdom of God through us as the 
Spirit may lead, there are big things ahead 
if we pull together and work and pray. 

The power of one hundred thousand 
people, moved with a common impulse for 
Jesus Christ, cannot fail of his sanction 
and cannot be fully estimated. We believe 
that this will be better understood as we 
labor together for this common end. 



Some Experiences of the Day 



Ida C. Shumaker 



IT is 6 o'clock. The doors of the din- 
ing-room are opened to admit the 
cook. Those on the compound are 
all astir. The Boarding School girls are 
busy with their toilet and water-filling, for 
they must be ready for morning prayers at 
7:30. We must work on schedule time. 
Happy to say that this morning our quiet 
hour has not been disturbed in any way. 
It is rarely this is true. 

It is 7 o'clock. The bell for " Chota 
Hazri " has not rung. We wait at the ta- 
ble five minutes. Here comes the excited 
cook! The "milk-woman" had not come 
on time. Her buffalo-cow would not get 
up to be milked, so how could she come 
any sooner? The woman who furnished the 
evening's milk, brought old milk, so it 
soured and the cook was obliged to wait 
for the morning milk. This excitement (?) 
over, we eat our bread and eggs, then fruit, 
and drink our tea in peace. 

The prayer bell rings. All on the com- 
pound, and some from the outside, are 
wending their way to the prayer-room. At 
this juncture the postman comes. Only 
the " daily," and three messages in the 
vernacular. You will be interested in their 
contents: One of the boys, who was sent 
to one of our schools to help out in the 
work, found the task a little harder than 



he was expecting, so he suddenly disap- 
peared, and turned up in another place. 
He was sent back at once. All went well 
for awhile, when he disappeared the sec- 
ond time. He was put to "digging" for 
punishment. This happened three months 
ago, when he was given his pay. He sud- 
denly remembered that he might get the 
money which was not given him when idle. 
So, why not ask for it? No harm in ask- 
ing. Oh, yes, we know the story well — 
" If you do not give me the money, I will 
die of hunger," etc., etc. 

Another happened to think that his wife 
was not getting enough wage, so, of course, 
he too must ask for an increase for her. 
He knows perfectly well what the rules 
are as to that. While in another place he 
heard that two widows, who have children 
to support, and who have qualifications 
such as to deserve a higher wage than his 
wife, who has no children, are getting more 
than his wife; so, of course, why not write 
to the " missionary-in-charge " and tell her 
the conditions, and urge her to make a plea 
for his wife before the Educational Com- 
mittee, so his wife gets what he thinks 
she deserves? Then number three is from 
a motherless girl who is going to work in 
a bungalow. She pleads with me to help 
her in this so the "high lady" will not be 



70 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1920 



mean to her — not make a slave of her, etc., 
and never thinks of giving me the address 
of this " high lady." We missionaries are 
supposed to be "all-knowing" — well, 
sometimes. 

A call to the front veranda. After put- 
ting the food, which remained on the ta- 
ble, out of reach of the' crows, which are 
so familiar that they come right in and 
steal everything that is stealable, and look- 
ing after the wood proposition, this wom- 
an's wants were heard. She had in her 
hand a piece of paper, known so well by 
all the missionaries as a " chit " — a note 
of request, invariably. She was questioned 
thoroughly as to the truthfulness of the 
contents. It would be intensely interesting 
to you were I to tell you the whole story. 
But it might shock your finer sensibilities. 

It is now 8 o'clock. The school bell is 
ringing. A number of the day-school pu- 
pils are there already, for they came in 
time for prayers. There are fifty-one pres- 
ent. They will be busy till 11 o'clock. 

Very early in the morning a young man 
comes for work. He was enrolled as a 
student in one of our boarding schools. 
While there he became a Christian. He 
is the only one of his people. He prefers 
to work for the mission, so he can be where 
the Christians are. His young wife is not 
a Christian as yet. Arrangements were 
made for him to go to work at once on a 
temporary building which is being con- 
structed for the accommodation of the stu- 
dents who will come in October from the 
various stations to prepare for the Ver- 
nacular Final Examination at Surat, in 
April. 

The " women laborers " are set to work 
to do some repairs on the " old line." We 
must, in some way, manage to accommo- 
date the teacher and his family who will 
come with this class. We are surely living 
in crowded quarters. This done, we re- 
ceive into the office the two men who are 
directly responsible for this work of plan- 
ning the building and arranging for this 
new class. For two solid hours we prayed 
and busied ourselves to get the plans on a 
working basis. Some readjustments must 
be made. To do this and not cause too 
much friction was the hard point. 

In the meantime the cook came from the 



bazaar. His wants were supplied, the or- 
der for breakfast given, and help provided 
where necessary to start the " breakfast 
ball" to rolling. The way back to the men 
in the office was blocked several times, the 
sweeper required something, the school 
was in need of a special picture which hap- 
pened to be upstairs, and, as usual, down 
at the bottom of the pile. These, and a 
few more things were looked after, and 
back to the office we went, to finish the 
task there. The men were given leave to 
make further investigations, and then to 
report later. Now for the desk work! It 
was merely touched, for there is the first 
bell for breakfast. It is now 10:45; break- 
fast at 11. I wish I had time to tell you 
what we are going to have for breakfast! 

Now the grain must be brought, for this 
is the day to give out grain to the needy. 
While this is being arranged, a messenger 
comes to report that " a new thing in re- 
gard to this new school has developed." It 
looks like a splendid proposition, so every- 




Plowing in Rice Fields Preparatory to Planting 




Planting Rice, Bulsar, India 

thing stops, a " chit " is hurriedly written, 
and a messenger despatched to Bulsar. 
While this is going on, the 1 o'clock school 
bell is ringing. There is no time for re- 
laxation. The desk must be cleared — too 
much important matter to "put off" till 



March 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



71 



tomorrow — too much at stake. So the type- 
writer must do its best to get the desk 
cleared as soon as possible, for the post- 
man will be along by 6 o'clock. 

What! Three o'clock already! Swallow 
your cup of tea and be off for the " chil- 
dren's hour"! I wish I could tell you 
what took place during that hour. COME 
AND SEE! Now hurry back and attend to 
the wants of the cook. Yes, that is an im- 
portant part of the work. Arrangements 
are made for the evening meal, some help 
given where needed— this, by the way, goes 
on all through the day, these personal 
touches — along with the looking after the 
house, and all that goes with it. 

More calls for office work at this point. 
Now a very sad case must be handled. 
How unpleasant for our gentlemen to be 
obliged to deal with such cases, yet how 
much more so for the ladies! The ex- 
pression on the face of my only " helper " 
reveals to me the fact that something of 
serious moment has occurred. A non- 
Christian man waits outside. I soon dis- 
cover that the "chit" of the morning was 
only a forerunner. The suspicion was well 
grounded." Investigation proved it. How 
sad we felt when we learned the whole 
truth concerning the sort of woman who 
was " chit " bearer of the morning, and the 
real reason why he was unable to come for 
his work in the schoolroom that day! 

But the worst is yet to come. He was 
found guilty of fornication. The man out- 
side the office, too, was in trouble, because 
his daughter also was guilty. He was out- 
casted by his caste people. There was quite 
an uproar in that village about this matter. 
So this case had to be met. I need not go 
into detail. We decided what to do and 
my helper started off with this non-Chris- 
tian to this village. Our prayers follow 
him as he goes on his mission. We want 
to save this brother, for " Christ and the 
church." 

At this juncture it seems absolutely nec- 
essary to try to " hit a crow." They are 
such cunning fellows that you can scarcely 
catch them. While I was getting some 
things out of the cupboard I turned, only 
to see two crows flying off with two meat 
cakes, another with the bread, and still an- 
other with some corn. Well, it looked as 



if we were not going to have any dinner at 
all. This was all done in a moment of time. 
It reminded me of the pictures of " Elijah 
being fed by the ravens," as I saw our food 
for dinner going in the beaks of the crows. 

Now it was time to do something. So I 
took Bro. Emmert's Winchester rifle and 
fired several times at the crows. I am 
sure you would have had some fun at my 
expense had you come into my office at 
this time. I had a long wait for my bait — 
it appeared long to me, as I waited and 
waited. They seem to know the moment 
that a gun is near, even though they can- 
not see. The next performance was to 
" make a dive " for the mice. They, too, 
were disturbing the peace. The cook was 
busy in the cook-house, killing rats with a 
bamboo pole. The chickens had to be 
driven from the garden — in some places 
they are " the neighbor contention." This 
done, the first dinner bell rings. Surely, it 
cannot be 6 o'clock! So the time goes. 
Just after dinner the gardener needed some 
help with his work. The cook's account 
must be taken and the order for the bazaar 
must be given, so the cook can start for 
the bazaar in the morning, immediately aft- 
er prayers. Some more details about the 
housework, the welcoming of the new bride 
whom our gardener has just brought, set- 
ting straight some " women's gossip," and 
then to our drawing-room for evening wor- 
ship. 

You have been given some of the highest 
points in the experiences of this one day. 
You have had quite enough to see that the 
missionary is not having a " soft snap," as 
some are wont to say. This is not an ex- 
traordinary day, either. If we had the time 
and strength and you cared to read, we 
could tell you some things that would open 
your eyes. Let this suffice for this time. 

Jalalpor, Surat District, India. 

The world's great need is Christ. The 
Christian's great duty is to live and teach 
him. If we can increase his kingdom, help 
enlighten waiting China by sending our 
daughter to them we bid her Godspeed, and 
pray that the giving may make us more 
efficient in the home church. 

Homer and Laura Ullom. 



72 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1920 



That Man of Macedonia: Who Was He? 



E. F. 

IT is a pleasure to make a "happy 
discovery." Whether the writer real- 
ly has made such discovery (as 
he rather intimates in this article) may, 
I suppose, be debatable. Just at this point 
suffice it to say I like to think that " that 
man " from Macedonia was a real flesh- 
and-bone man who made an appeal to 
Paul as man to man. Of course there was 
the vision and the supernatural, I grant, 
but the Bible speaks of "a man," and he 
came from Macedonia. Who was he? 

It is generally conceded that Luke, the 
" beloved physician,'" wrote the Acis. 
Whoever wrote it came in touch with Paul 
when, on his second missionary tour, 
Paul was "on a study" where to go; the 
Spirit having forbidden him to preach the 
Gospel in Asia. The city of Troas was the 
place. Leaving Troas the writer (Luke we 
believe) very modestly, by a simple touch 
of the pen in inserting the pronoun " we," 
tells us that he was with Paul's party un- 
til they were ready to leave Philippi in 
Macedonia. On the last leg of the third 
journey the writer gets into the party at 
Philippi. I therefore conclude that Phil- 
ippi in Macedonia was Luke's home. 

" But," you say, " if you call that a dis- 
covery that isn't so wonderful." Very well. 
Do you not remember that the man who 
appeared to Paul at Troas was from Mac- 
edonia and also that it so happened (if in- 
deed it was a " happen so ") that Luke ac- 
companied Paul to his home country, Mac- 
edonia? I just can't help feeling that 
Luke was "that man" referred to in the 
" Macedonia call." There was the super- 
natural element no doubt in the vision. 
But I believe also that there was the man 
element — the human element we call it — 
and I think Luke played that part. 

But why all this? What's the . differ- 
ence? Just this (I know I will be par- 
doned, for I know no other's experience like 
my own) : After having been actively en- 
gaged in church work for a dozen years, 
and after having received calls from mis- 
sion boards, both home and foreign, and 
from churches, for both pastoral and evan- 



Sherfy 

gelistic help, I like to think — yea, believe 
with my whole heart — that God's calls are 
made in much the same way as he has al- 
ways made them, and that his calls today 
to you and to me are just as definite as 
when he called Isaiah or John the Bap- 
tist or Paul. 

Even granting that the vision was while 
Paul slept (though the Bible doesn't s"ay 
so), I tell you I can't help feeling that that 
man Luke .from Macedonia had just pre- 
viously " gotten around " the great mission- 
ary; had "laid the case before him" and 
upon his heart (like Moffat put it up to 
Livingstone, and like Mission Board men 
today put it up to us), until Paul just 
could not have normal sleep for seeing 
" in the night the man from Macedonia, 
saying, 'Come over into Macedonia and 
help us.'" 

There are, as my experience teaches me, 
at least four things which enter into a 
"call": 

1. A vision. In the case cited, Paul 
caught the " vision." Isaiah saw a vision 
of God; then of himself; then of a needy 
world. The same applies today. 

2. Some one, as God's ambassador, to im- 
press one with the need and the open door 
(which is a part of the vision), and make 
the appeal as I think Luke made it to 
Paul. 

3. Ability, either actual or potential, to 
meet that need. 

4. A closed door (as when the Spirit for- 
bade Paul's going into Asia) into other 
fields or lines of activity. Just this note 
on point 4: With the leadable Christian 
it has to do with the call into definite 
fields. With us who may be a bit self- 
willed it may be God's last resort just to 
block our way. 

I say again, at the cost of repeating, that 
God calls as definitely, as strongly and as 
marvelously as he ever did. And when a 
Student Volunteer secretary, or mission 
board man, or a pastoral committeeman 
from a run-down country church, or a 
Sunday-school superintendent or solicitor 
for a good cause, or your pastor, or who- 



March 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



73 



ever shows you a need and an open door in- 
to service, it is just as much God speaking 
to you in a Macedonian call as when God 
through Luke gave Paul definite knowledge 
of Macedonia and her need and led him to 
Europe to plant the seed of Christianity 
and Western civilization of which you and 
I are the product. What if Paul had not 
answered the call? Well, what if? What 
if we don't? 

Now if I seem unnecessarily to have 
pressed a theory which I cannot absolute- 
ly prove, you will pardon me, perhaps, 
when I tell you that it is a growing and 
burning conviction of mine that until mis- 
sion boards, ministerial boards, pastoral 



committees and elders of our churches get 
right next to our young people — "go after 
them," as I think Luke went after Paul — 
and lay before them the fourfold call — 
until that is done our run-down churches 
are going to continue to die, and missions 
at home and abroad will suffer. I know 
by experience how it feels to have such 
a one " get after " a fellow. Though it 
doesn't feel so good at the time, it gets 
results, and would to God more Lukes 
were pressing more Pauls into definite serv- 
ice, and that more like Paul had ears to 
hear a definite call when it comes, and 
grace to respond thereto. 
Conway, Kans. 



Opportunities for Work Among Women 
of Depressed Classes 



Laura M. Cottrell, M. D. 



THE three hundred and fifteen mil- 
lions of people in India are divided 
by social customs and religious 
practices into some thousands of different 
classes or castes and subcastes. Most of 
these castes are distinguished from each 
other by very trivial differences; but the 
whole of them may be roughly divided in- 
to three great general classes; viz., high 
caste, low caste and outcaste or " untouch- 
ables." The low caste and outcastes are 
the depressed peoples. 

The social customs and religious practic- 
es of these three great classes are markedly 
different. In brief, the people of one caste 
may not eat or work with or intermarry 
with the people of another caste. In some 
parts of India the high-caste Hindu con- 
siders that even the shadow of an outcaste 
will pollute him, let alone their being 
touched or touching them. Hence the name 
of " untouchables." In the whole of India 
there are some fifty million outcastes, an 
average of about one person in every seven. 
As the Jews in Christ's time considered the 
Samaritans " outcastes," so the higher 
castes of India consider these low castes. 

These depressed classes are in as great 
need of medical care as any others, and 
often more so, for many times no one will 



attend them, fearing defilement. Many of 
them are dirty, live in squalid, unsanitary 
surroundings, have low religious and moral 
standards, and no education. Some, how- 
ever, are clean and live above their en- 
vironments. It is often a most undesir- 
able task to enter their houses, and yet we 
are glad for the opportunity of service. 
Their souls are worth just as much as those 
of the high-caste Brahmins, and Christ 
came to save ALL men. Even by the 
smallest service God can be glorified, so 
it is well. 

Opportunities come in a special way to 
serve the women of India, and particularly 
those of the depressed classes. When these 
untouchables approach the dispensary they 
stand afar off and do not even come on the 
veranda, which is used as the waiting roosi 
until called. They seem so surprised thai 
they are invited that far; and when they 
are called inside, examined and cared for, 
the same as others of higher castes, they 
are even more surprised. These people 
respond to kindnesses and are always grate- 
ful for what is done for them. 

Not long ago a call came from one of 
these outcaste homes, saying the wife and 
mother was in great need. Leaving the 
morning's w T ork in the hands of an assist- 



74 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1920 



ant we went and found the woman in the 
greatest need that comes to woman.- Help 
was given, the woman's life was saved and 
friends were made. 

Another opportunity is to teach the laws 
of sanitation and health, give advice as to 
cleanliness of person and home, precau- 
tions to be taken against infectious dis- 
eases, and lessons in the care and feeding 
of small infants. They scarcely know the 
most elementary principles of hygiene and 
sanitation. It is a long road to ideal con- 
ditions, and efforts at betterment are be- 
ing made by different organizations and 
activities in India. These homes are so 
dark that often at midday you cannot see 
the patient lying on the bed, until the eye 
becomes accustomed to this condition. As 
often as not she is lying on the floor. You 
are glad even for a smoking oil lamp, with- 
out a chimney, to aid you in finding the 
patient. The walls are black from the open 
cooking-places. Rubbish is in the corners 
or under the bed. The cattle and goats, 
just outside, and chickens and dogs about, 
do not aid in cleanliness. 

One of the greatest needs is proper care 
during childbirth. Their old customs are 
about the worst possible for both mother 
and child. During the last fifty years 
throughout the world great advances have 
been made in our knowledge of the proper 
treatment during this time and the care of 
babes. Especially in oriental countries is 
this a matter of great moment. The in- 
fant mortality in India is appalling. One of 
the most important factors in contributing 
to this high mortality is the native " dai," 
or midwife. She has inherited her position 
from her ancestors, knows absolutely noth- 
ing about the simplest antiseptics, and 
keeps passing infection from one to anoth- 
er of her " patients." Here is an oppor- 
tunity to get in touch with these women 
and to instruct them as to proper methods. 
Government reports show that in the city 
of Bombay out of every one hundred babies 
under one year of age from thirty-three to 
fifty-two die annually. In the country dis- 
tricts the percentage runs even higher. At 
least one-half of these deaths could be pre- 
vented. In Europe and America the an- 
nual infant mortality rate is from ten to 
twenty per hundred. 



The proper care of infants is another 
problem, and especially when the feeding 
is artificial. Often mothers come to the 
dispensary and show the bottle from which 
the baby takes its food. It is a nest of 
growing germs, and how the little life con- 
tinues on such a diet is more than can be 
believed. Attempts are made to instruct 
the mother as to keeping the bottle clean, 
the milk properly cared for, etc. Promises 
are given, but how well kept is difficult to 
determine. 

The opportunities are many; these are 
but a few; and as opportunities come to 
teach them these most vital questions an 
effort is made to point them to the Savior. 
An old woman, an outcaste, was converted 
at the age of sixty years. She plead with 
the missionary to explain why she had not 
been told about Jesus sooner. She was 
old now, and had so few years for serv- 
ice. She was one. of these " untouchables," 
and yet Christ " touched " her to transform 
and uplift. And there are many such 
throughout the land. Shall there not be 
more? 

Slowly but surely Christ is being recog- 
nized as Leader and King. Among all 
classes is he being recognized. Sometimes 
the road seems long and dark, and yet it is 
surely appearing. One man in India, who 
was a secret believer in Christ, but had not 
the courage to make, open confession, said, 
" None but Jesus, none but Jesus, deserves 
to wear the bright and glorious diadem of 
India — and Jesus shall have it." Can we 
Christians say less than this? And shall we 
not bend every effort toward the end that 
Jesus shall be crowned King in the hearts 
of all men and women in India? 

Bulsar, India. 

The Redman says the following is the 
Shawnee Indian's motto: 

No roll 'um, 

No smoke 'um, 

No chew 'um, 

No spit 'um, 

No loaf 'um, 

No drink 'um (booze), 

Heap catch 'um (bootlegger), 

No sell 'um (land), 

Heap plant 'um (corn), 

No spend 'um (money), 

Heap kill 'um (weeds), 

All 'time save 'um (baby), 

Mebbe so, catch 'um prize. 



March 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 1 „ 75 

What if These Sixty Million Become Arya Samaj ? 



E. H. Eby 



THE Arya Samaj is a reform sect in 
India which has as its slogan, " Back 
to the Vedas." The Vedas are the 
most ancient of the Hindu sacred books, 
and are believed to be truly inspired, and 
so to contain the very essence of all true 
wisdom. " Back to the Vedas " means to 
the Hindus much the same as " Back to the 
apostles " would mean to. the Christian 
church of today. It is a call to return to 
the ancient simplicity of the Aryan fore- 
fathers. 

Idolatry and caste are later develop- 
ments; hence to go back to the Vedas 
means to go back to the time in Indian 
history when there was no idolatry and no 
caste system. Loyalty to the ancient Scrip- 
tures, as opposed to the more modern pro- 
ductions, brings with it a reverence for all 
that is distinctly Aryan. India for the 
Indians, in political and industrial lines as 
well as in religious matters, is the ideal of 
the leaders of this cult. Hence they are 
enemies to all that is foreign, both political 
and religious. 

The Arya Samajists are implacable ene- 
mies of Christianity, regarding it as a 
foreign religion and therefore having no 
right in India. In order to spread their 
own doctrines they have borrowed many 
of the Christian methods of propagation, 
such as street preaching, distribution of 
literature, erection and conduct of schools 
and orphanages, and itinerant propagan- 
dists. They will go to almost any length 
to bring a native Christian back into Hin- 
duism. This cult may be regarded as the 
most actively hostile to Christianity of all 
the Hindu cults. 

They take into their society people from 
every station in life, even the low caste and 
outcaste, though it is true that in secret 
the deep-seated prejudices find expression 
in acts that are inimical to true brother- 
hood. Still, their fight against caste is 
commendable, as is also their opposition to 
idolatry. In these respects they may be 
considered allies of Mohammedanism and 
Christianity. There is common ground 
thus far. 

Indeed, some missionaries consider Arya 
Samaj as a sort of stepping-stone toward 



Christianity; that though they are now 
our greatest opponents, it will eventually 
be found that the Vedas do not contain 
enough truth to support the religious life 
of the adherents, and that they will come 
eventually to Christ for complete satisfac- 
tion. This is the most optimistic view pos- 
sible. Such a result is far in the distance, 
at least. 

What if the sixty millions of the abo- 
rigines and outcastes should become Arya 
Samaj? And this is a possibility. Their 
propaganda is resulting in tremendous 
gains. First of all, it may be said that the 
people would be lifted to a higher state of 
civilization. Education is one of their 
agencies, as it is of Christianity. Being 
already largely free from caste restrictions 
these aborigines would find little difficulty 
in entering this cult. As to idolatry, there 
would be more difficulty, but even here the 
case is not hopeless, as the aborigines are 
largely animistic and are not as idolatrous 
as are the Hindus. 

Were these sixty millions to become 
Aryas they would be at once inaccessible to 
Christianity, for a great while at least. 
They would constitute a force of opposition 
that would bid fair to drive Christianity 
quite out of India. For the Christian re- 
ligion would be boycotted along with for- 
eign goods and people. Already the Arya 
Samaj are a very active element in the 
opposition to government. To fail to reach 
and win these reachable millions in this 
moment of opportunity will mean their loss 
to Christianity, and to the highest interests 
of India herself, for Christ is India's only 
hope. That all the sacred books of India 
do not contain enough truth to uplift her 
people is proved by her thirty centuries of 
history. 

Christ can save India's sons and redeem 
Indian society. He must be given a chance 
to do it NOW, or the opportunity will pass. 
Such a catastrophe is too painful to think 
about. Not " back to the Vedas," but for- 
ward to Christ is India's need. It is her 
only hope of future prosperity and happi- 
ness. " We can do it, and we will." India 
for Christ. 

Bulsar, India. 



76 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1920 



The Awakening of the Outcastes of India 



A. W. Ross 



THE awakening of the outcastes of In- 
dia is a subject that is of increasing 
interest to the leaders of all classes 
in the country. The reform movements are 
taking note of the fact that these people 
have aroused from their long lethargy and 
seeming indifference to their low degraded 
position and are now demanding their 
rights with increasing emphasis and suc- 
cess. They now see that many of these so- 
called " unfits " are in the top ranks, often 
commanding positions of more influence 
and pay than are many of the higher castes, 
and also that these people are going into 
the Christian church with alarming rapidity, 
and that unless they bestir themselves, soon 
the bulk of these will have passed beyond 
the pale of Hinduism. Consequently they 
are endeavoring to loosen up the social and 
religious ties, and are trying to gain for 
them a welcome to embrace Hinduism, and 
to make them " clean " and " touchable." 

The home rulers see that their claims for 
home rule will fall on deaf ears unless they 
are willing to change their attitude towards 
the 50,000,000 people who are suffering far 
more from their tyranny and graft than are 
they, the home rulers, from the rule of a 
foreign power. 

The industrial man, who is seeking to 
exploit the wealth of India, whether for his 
own good or for the good of the country, 
sees that those who form the bulk of the 
laboring classes must be raised from their 
present standard of moral weakness and in- 
dustrial inefficiency. 

But who are these outcastes? Perhaps 
their position and condition can be most 
tersely told in the terms of the story of the 
traveler who was being taken by a certain 
high-caste man to his village home. Upon 
nearing the village he saw two groups of 
thatched houses nestled among the trees. 
He asked if this was the village, and his 
friend disgustingly replied that " that is 
not the village, but only the place where the 
pariahs or outcastes live." Going on they 
came to a group of houses smaller than 
the others, whereupon he was told that 
now they had reached the village. 



Mana told the people of India that the 
outcastes were created to be the slaves of 
the Brahmins. He laid down such regula- 
tions: " The abode of the chandala and the 
swapaca must be out of town; they must 
not have the use of entire vessels; their 
sole wealth must be dogs and asses. Their 
clothes must be the mantles of the de- 
ceased; their dishes for food, broken pots; 
their ornaments, rusty iron. Let no man 
who regards his duty, religious and civil, 
hold intercourse with them; let their trans- 
actions be confined to themselves, and their 
marriages be only between equals. Let 
food be given them in potsherds, but not 
by the hand of the giver; and let them not 
walk by night in cities or towns." 

Until the missionaries reached out the 
hand of sympathy and brought them into 
their schools, the outcastes had no chance 
for an education. Now there are other 
agencies, seeking to bring educational ad- 
vantages to their doors, and some of these 
have received widespread recognition from 
the public, such as the depressed classes' 
mission schools. Government' schools are 
supposed to be open to them, but often they 
are made so uncomfortable by both teach- 
ers and pupils that they can not stand it to 
remain long in the school. I have often 
seen these boys either sitting outside on the 
veranda, or quite aloof from the other chil- 
dren of the school. When the teacher has 
examined the slate of the pupil he will place 
it on the ground and then the pupil takes 
it up, and vice versa. There dare be no 
handing of the slate from teacher to pupil 
directly. 

These are the " outcastes," the " sub- 
merged sixth," the "untouchables" and the 
" unfits " of literature. They have been the 
serfs and slaves to the greed and wish of 
the others above them, but happily, through 
contact with the European race, through 
education and travel, they are awakening 
to a consciousness of their true position 
and rights, and of the possibilties before / 
them. 

Richter, in his " History of Missions in 
India," estimates that about 90 per cent of 



March 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



77 



the converts gathered in by the various 
missions during the last half of the nine- 
teenth century were from the outcastes, or 
in numbers about 1,000,000, into the Prot- 
estant churches. Since the beginning of 
the new century the growth has been most 
marked, government statistics telling us 
that in the province of Punjab the Indian 
Christians increased 431.6 per cent in the 
first ten years of the century. It is also 
interesting to note that this figure is larger 
than the missions claim, indicating that 
many have been influenced who have not 
yet been enrolled in the Christian churches. 

The Mass Movements in India, which 
have attracted so much attention, properly 
go back to the days of the famous mission- 
ary, Fredric Swartz, in South India. Then 
England and France were struggling for 
supremacy; and Swartz was the one man 
who had the right of entrance to all the 
camps, and who could reach the courts of 
the native rulers. He won the confidence 
of the shanars, who are not really out- 
castes, but were the lowest of the castes 
and were regarded about the same as the 
outcastes by the Brahmins. When he died, 
after fifty years of unbroken service, he 
left 18,000 of these people Christians. This 
was in the southernmost district of India, 
where there are today over 100,000 Chris- 
tians, self-supporting as to living, primary 
schools and churches. Many of these Chris- 
tians are of great ability and hold promi- 
nent positions in church, state and society, 
and are most highly respected even by their 
former persecutors. 

The movement spread into Travancore 
State, on the west coast, through the lead- 
ership of Ringeltaube, and a hundred years 
later there were in his mission alone 72,000 
Christians and a large number in other mis- 
sions. 

The first real break among the outcastes 
proper was in this same native State of 
Travancore, and in 1867 in two small dis- 
tricts four thousand were baptized. The 
fearful famine of 1876-79 gave India a new 
and striking demonstration of the humani- 
tarian spirit of Christianity. Government 
did what it could -With limited means and 
poor facilities for transportation, but it was 
the missionary who got close to the people 



and often made effective the work of the 
government. Dr. Clough, of the Ongole 
District, took the contract for digging a 
canal. He thus gave employment to many 
thousands. The laborers were grouped and 
teachers and preachers were stationed 
among them. The result was that thou- 
sands applied for baptism, but this was 
steadily refused while the famine was on. 
The people were let go to their homes, and 
after a time those who still clung to their 
former decision and who were properly in- 
structed, were received into the church. 
And there were thousands of them — over 
9,000 in one year. From that time on there 
has been a continuous increase, and now 
there are in that one mission alone, which 
in thirty years had received only a few hun- 
dred converts, over 100,000 Christians. 

In 1880 two Anglican societies baptized 
19,000 in the Tinnevely District, while the 
Wesleyans in thirty years, in the Hydera- 
bad State, baptized 12,000, and the Church 
Missionary Society in Warangel and Ellore 
Districts, near there, baptized 15,000 in the 
same time. Other missions made similar 
gains. In the Hyderabad State in 1901 
there were 23,000 Christians, while in 1911 
there were 54,000. In the Telugu country 
the number had risen from 19,132 in 1871 
to 222,150 in 1901. 

It was not long till the break came 
among .the outcastes of North India. In 
the Punjab and the United Provinces the 
Methodist Mission has devoted itself to 
winning the outcastes, and now yearly are 
baptizing 30,000 to 40,000 of them. In 1875 
the United Presbyterians had 153 Christians 
in their Punjab work, but in 1910 the num- 
ber had risen to 40,000 and in that last year 
had increased 25 per cent. The American 
Presbyterians have had also large results 
in these two provinces. In other parts of 
India there were similar turnings, but not 
on so large a scale. In most of these places 
the missionaries have not been able to keep 
pace with the movement, and were com- 
pelled to turn away many thousands for 
lack of funds and workers to follow up the 
work. Sad it is that the educational work 
has not kept pace and only 10 per cent of 
the converts' children are in school. The 
various missions are putting tremendous 



78 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1920 



forces to work for both their spiritual and 
educational uplift, but the people keep com- 
ing by the thousands and the situation is 
almost desperate with some of them. The 
awakening of the churches at home has giv-' 
en new hope and inspired the missionaries 
to push on, trusting that the churches will 
respond with the means and the men to 
carry this work through to ultimate suc- 
cess. 

" The significance of this great move- 
ment, which is growing in volume every 
year," says the bishop of Madras, " lies in 
the fact that it represents a revolt against 
the tyranny of caste, and a vehement asser- 
tion of the great principle of the brother- 
hood of man. The movement may seem 
at present small and insignificant, like the 
cloud on the horizon, . . . but it is fraught 
with untold blessings to India and is des- 
tined to revolutionize its whole life . 
It is a battle for justice and humanity, for 
the rights of the weak against the strong, 
and for the liberation of the downtrodden 
and the oppressed from a cruel and degrad- 
ing tyranny." 

On top of this awakening, which has 
come largely through the evangelistic and 
educational work of the missionaries, is 
seen the political awakening of India. The 
movement for home rule developed with 
most remarkable rapidity, and the outcastes 
soon saw that unless they bestirred them- 
selves they would be engulfed. They held 
mass meetings all over the country, more 
especially in the south, either as a protest 
against home rule or to demand communal 
representation to protect their interests. 
They had acquired a class consciousness, 
sense of their rights and importance, and a 
determination to assert their rights and de- 
mand just treatment, a thing which they, 
through long experience, could hardly hope 
for under Brahmin rule, which they feared 
would be the outcome of home rule. 

Then, too, the outcastes in large numbers 
have gone into war service, mostly to Mes- 
opotamia, and in the Panjab the ranks of 
the army were opened for the first time to 
the Punjabi Christians. This is having a 
large influence on the people, giving them a 
new vision of the outside world, and of the 
possibilities before them. Many have been 



able to pay off their debts to their former 
masters and employers, and now breathe 
as free men, and many who have returned 
have risen to responsible positions and 
places of respect. 

This great movement brings prominently 
to the front several things, of which I men- 
tion two, the urgency of the opportunity, 
and the need for large educational efforts. 
Taking the first, the outcastes of India were 
never more open to the Christian message 
than they are today. They have tasted the 
sweets of civilization, largely coming to 
them through Christianity, and it is to the 
Christian church that they will look for 
leadership and guidance and eternal hope; 
but if the churches fail to grasp the present 
opportunity and exploit it for Christ and 
his kingdom, they will turn elsewhere, 
where they will close by find them other 
organizations as the Arya Samaj, which is 
carrying on a very aggressive campaign to 
stem the. tide of Christianity and even to 
win back those who have become Chris- 
tians. Then there are the Mohammedans, 
who have always been taking in these same 
peoples, and they, too, hold out the hand 
of welcome to these people. 

The second thing of great importance is 
that this widespread movement must be 
backed up by a much greater educational 
program, especially for the rural communi- 
ties. It is stated on good authority that 87 
per cent of the Christians are illiterate, and 
that one large society states that only about 
10 per cent of the children are in school, 
while the majority of those who do attend 
hardly get beyond the infant standard, and 
so become illiterate in a few years. This 
mass movement gives the churches very 
largely a rural educational problem which 
must be worked out along the line of their 
life needs, in a very large measure. The 
issue is great and fraught with much dan- 
ger to the Christian church. It must be 
backed up by a great educational forward 
movement. 

Though in our own mission we have had 
no such large movement of the masses (and 
this may be due to our cautiousness on the 
one hand and the fact that there is not so 
much caste unity among the aboriginal 
tribes forming the masses with us as there 



March 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



79 



is among the outcastes), we have in several 
of our stations, wide-open doors, the people 
in these several stations being most favor- 
ably impressed and coming to us in con- 
stant numbers. We are bringing their chil- 
dren, and even their non-Christian children, 
into our boarding schools in increasing 
numbers. 

Socially these people hold a much higher 
place than do the outcastes. While the lat- 
ter are not allowed'in or about the houses 
of the caste people, these who form the 
bulk of the population with us are sufficient- 
ly high in the social scale to draw water 
and do practically everything by way of 
domestic service except to actually cook 
the food. Economically, in several of our 



stations they are also better off than the 
outcastes, but educationally they are little 
better, though there is an increasing num- 
ber in all schools. The facts are that the 
children whom we took in in the early days 
from the outcastes have proved more apt 
students than those from the aboriginals, 
and some of those from the middle castes. 

However, the problems of our work, and 
the methods of solution are common to 
practically all missions working among the 
less-educated peoples, whether outcastes or 
some others. The key to the future pros- 
perity, strength and permanency of our 
work among these people is an all-around 
education of the head, hand and the heart. 




mmm 



Shaded areas show the chief districts 
affected by the mass movements toward 
Christianity. 



Over 50,000,000 are involved in these 
mass movements. 



80 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1920 



Our First Christmas in China 



THOSE of the new 
China mission field who are attend- 
ing the North China Language 
School in Peking this session were privi- 
leged to enjoy Christmas in that great city. 
We had wondered all along how it would 
impress us to spend that precious season 
in a great heathen country like China, and 
since it has become a reality I wish to give 
briefly some of our experiences and of their 
effect upon us. 

As the time drew nearer we began to 
see real evidences of appreciation for the 
great Gift to the world. Every day, as we 
went to and from school, we could hear 
the children in one of the mission schools 
practicing familiar Christmas hymns, and 
almost two weeks before Christmas a beau- 
tiful program was rendered, strictly by the 
Chinese, too, in the American Board Mis- 
sion church, near where we live. How we 
do wish that many, of our friends in the 
homeland could have enjoyed it with us! 
They, quite naturally, could not have un- 
derstood much, but just the atmosphere of 
the place, and the facial expression of those 
hundreds of people, were enough to make 
one really understand what they were com- 
memorating. In the first place, the church 
was so fittingly and tastefully decorated. 
Then the whole congregation, children in 
front and adults in the rear, marched in 
from the outside, singing, " Onward, Chris- 



Sara Zigler Myers 

recruits to the tian Soldiers." Both little and big, old and 



young, sang with a spirit that would make 
many an American audience ashamed. The 
whole program, which was composed of 
music, readings and recitations, was truly 
fine. Even the tiny tots (about thirty-six 
of them sang a little song) seemed to real- 
ize in a measure the meaning of the Christ- 
mas season. Each of us came away feeling 
that we had had a real feast of spiritual 
food, even though some of us could under- 
stand very little that was said. One man, 
an American, remarked as we came out 
that what was done there that day was the 
result of fifty years' work. We thought 
that perhaps at some time the task had 
been hard for those early pioneer mission- 
aries, and the results seemingly few, but 
the present outgrowth of those untiring ef- 
forts are worth far more than the whole 
world in their significance. 

As Christmas Day drew nearer some oth- 
er interesting things took place. The stu- 
dents of the Language School wished to do 
something for some of the poor of the 
city; so on Tuesday afternoon before 
Christmas more than one hundred orphans 
from the orphan asylum were brought by 
means of a motor truck to our school. 
There a little program for them was given. 
For a while the children, together with our 
students, enjoyed some outdoor games; 
then various things of interest indoors. Aft- 




Beginners and Girls' Department of Chinese Sunday-school 



March 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



81 



er they were all seated on the floor, girls 
in one end of the room and boys in the 
other, tea, cakes and candy were served 
them. They seemed to enjoy everything 
done for them, and it made one's heart both 
sad and glad to see them. As a climax the 
Christmas tree was plucked of its fruit and 
each bright-eyed tot received some toy, for 
which he very gracefully bowed in appre- 
ciation and thankfulness. Some of the 
most promising faces I have ever seen were 
among those children, and we could only 
breathe a short prayer to God that in some 
good way each child could be trained and 
developed for his service. 

On the next day, Wednesday, we again 
enjoyed a program, given for the wives and 
children of the Language School teachers. 
Many of them are very poor and it was 
quite fitting that they, too, should share 
some of the Christmas joy. A program of 
both Chinese and English talent was first 
rendered in the Chinese language. Then 
tea and cakes were served to all, old and 
young. And again, as a climax, Santa Claus 
appeared and gave to each child a little 
gift from the pretty Christmas tree. To 
see the happy expression on the young 
faces as their names were called out was 
enough to make any one love and appre- 
ciate the Chinese people more than ever 
before in his life. 

Christmas Day dawned cold and cloudy. 
Although we had no snow, except for a few 
flakes lazily floating about in the air, the 
trees were covered with ice, which re- 
mained throughout the day, and made it 
seem quite like Christmas indeed. It was 
the first weather of that kind we had ex- 
perienced here. 

Our little Peking group spent a most 
enjoyable day. For dinner we were invited 
into the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Pet- 
tus. Mr. Pettus is the principal of our 
Language School, and he and his excellent 
wife and three little boys compose a most 
interesting and admirable family. Natural- 
ly we enjoyed being in this home, as so far 
we have not visited many American homes; 
and to get a real taste of American life 
and fellowship on this, our first Christmas 
Day in China, made it seem quite as if 
we were visiting our own homes for a few 
hours. A most delicious meal had been 



prepared for us and we enjoyed it to the 
full. 

It seemed that almost too many good 
things came our way that day, but we 
could hardly afford to turn them down. In 
the evening we were invited to dine with a 
Chinese friend, Mr. Chiao, and his family. 
This was a new experience for us, but a 
most pleasant one. Some of us have not 
yet learned to eat Chinese food with a very 
great relish, but the food prepared in this 
home surely was fine. Our biggest dif- 
ficulty was in using chopsticks, but even 
they were handled with greater ease than 
we had expected. This home is a Chris- 
tian home and we very much enjoyed as- 
sociating with such a fine family. We were 
forced to use Chinese in conversing with 
them, but by means of signs and motions, 
and with special appreciation of our most 
limited knowledge of the language, by the 
members of the family, together with some 
interpretation by the eldest son, who could 
speak some English, we were able to have 
a delightful visit. 

Thus we spent our first Christmas in 
China, and it was filled with joy and hap- 
piness for us. Of course the thing we 
missed most was the usual greetings and 
little gifts from friends and relatives in the 
homeland, but that vacancy was bountiful- 
ly filled by having the privilege of giving 
to and serving a few of the most destitute 
and needy in this city, and of seeing the 
Chinese Christians enter into the real 
Christmas spirit with praise and thanks- 
giving. And let me say that the children 
who sang, praised, and received gifts in the 
services we attended had, we felt, more of 
the real knowledge and appreciation of the 
meaning of the birth of our Lord and Sav- 
ior than thousands of our American chil- 
dren who receive the very finest gifts each 
year. Praise the Lord for the teaching 
that has already been done. But there is 
another side to the question, and that is 
the sad and pitiable one that only a very 
few in this great mass of humanity have 
been reached. Only a walk from the beau- 
tiful services which we attended to our 
home, a short distance away, told us that 
the masses are still ignorant of the saving 
Gospel brought to the world through the 
birth of the blessed Jesus. 

Union Language School, Peking, China. 



82 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1920 



China Notes for December 

V. Grace Clapper 



THE girls at Liao Chou are now en- 
joying their new home in the 
" Sweitzer Memorial Girls' School." 
This school is in the east suburb of the 
city, too far out for day pupils during the 
winter, so the twenty-eight girls enrolled 
at present are all boarding pupils. This 
gives opportunity for daily teaching and 
domestic training that is not possible with 
day-school pupils; nevertheless, day-pupils 
are always welcome. The opening of the 
government school for girls in Liab makes 
a difference in the attendance, too, as many 
are enrolled there whom we hoped to have 
attend our mission school, but growing 
appreciation of education will in time 
bring them to us as we improve our work 
and the Lord changes their hearts. 

Since Sister Hutchison's return to the 
field she has been enabled to resume her 
ministrations among the women of Liao 
Chou, her work in that department hav- 
ing been interrupted for nearly three years 
while substituting in the Girls' School, and 
going home on furlough, which always 
makes a break in one's activities. She ex- 
presses a keen pleasure and satisfaction 
in thus being enabled to take up her cho- 
sen duties again, and during these closing 
months of the year has not only been doing 
special teaching of individuals, but has 
made a rather complete canvass of the city 
and found open doors everywhere. The 
recent steps of progress enforced by our 
wide-awake governor in the education of 
girls, and the prohibiting of footbinding 
among them, as well as the unbinding by 
the women, has added emphasis to the 
teaching of the missionaries, and made the 
people more open to their message; yet 
with all this improvement it still requires 
much time and infinite patience to train 
them away from their age-long faith and 
superstitions, and develop real character 
and Christian principles. 

Christmas week was a very joyous one at 
Pingting. The Men's Station Class closed 
just a short time previous with a number 



of enquirers desiring baptism. On Mon- 
day of Christmas week thirty-three pre- 
cious souls, including men, women, and 
children, were born into the kingdom 
and on the evening of the same day an 
impressive communion service was held. 
On Tuesday evening the Girls' School 
rendered a splendid Christmas program, 
and the Bo3's' School a similar one on 
Wednesday evening. On Christmas morn- 
ing services were held in the church, and 
in the afternoon a program was rendered 
by the school children and kindergarten 
for the special benefit of the children of 
the city, at the close of which the hearts of 
about three hundred children were glad- 
dened by the gift of a card and a bit of 
sweets. 

Si 

Dec. 26 Sister Jung, who was the first 
woman taken into the church at Pingting, 
was laid to rest after nine years of Chris- 
tian service, during which time she was 
ever ready to witness for her Master. She 
was sixty-nine years of age. 

Our first Christmas at Showyang has 
come and gone. For some weeks previous 
the air was attune with Christmas carols 
sung by the schoolboys and girls in prep- 
aration for the day. To most of these the 
Christmas story was a new one, but they 
nevertheless entered into the preparations 
for the day in the same spirit with which 
the boys and girls at home enter into the 
joys of this blessed season. Our hearts 
were made glad as we watched these dark- 
skinned boys and girls pouring out their 
hearts in song to swell the Christmas 
chorus. A service was held on Christmas 
morning, in which the few native Chris- 
tians at this place, and others employed as 
helpers, took an active part. At the close 
of this service an opportunity was given 
to those who so desired, to enroll as en- 
quirers, when eight men and two women 
came forward and placed their names on 
record as prospective followers of the 
Master. We are told, and have every rea- 
son to believe, that the wickedness of this 



March 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



83 



city is very great, and some of these en- 
quirers are among the most sinful, but 
" Christ receiveth sinful men," and we are 
glad that the Spirit is working in these 
lives and convicting them of their sins. 
Pray that these may have strength and 
courage to carry out the good resolutions 
they have made. 

& 

Mr. Yu, the new hospital evangelist at 
Liou Chou, is doing splendid work and has 
shown marked ability in personal work. 
Bro. Chang is doing splendidly in " follow- 
ing up " the patients as they go to their 
homes. He reports nine men from one 
village who desire to study the Bible more 
thoroughly with the view of receiving 
baptism. Most of these men have been 
patients in the hospital. 

S 

A Christmas program was rendered at 
the Liao Hospital for the benefit of the 



patients and helpers. The Life of Christ 
series and other pictures were shown by 
the use of the stereopticon. 
& 
Mr. Li, a product of mission schools, 
and a man of experience in mission work 
in Peking, is now assisting Bro. Flory 
in the evangelistic work at Liao. Up to 
this time Bro. Flory has had no native 
especially appointed to assist in this work 
He feels that by working with and through 
Mr. Li he can get nearer to the hearts of 
the Chinese. Pray for them in this im- 
portant work. 

There were thirty-two accessions to the 
church at Liao during 1919, and study 
classes have been arranged for a number 
of enquirers who wish to study the true 
doctrine with the view of entering the 
church. Pray that many more may see the 
light and embrace it in 1920. 

Showyanghsien, Shansi. 



India Notes for December 



Ida C. Shumaker 



A FEW hours ago a postcard came 
from Bro. Stover. We could scarce- 
ly read it; no reflection at all on 
his penmanship. You will understand 
when he says, " I am sick abed, and write 
a bit lying on my back." The truth of 
the matter is that he and little Helen are 
down with the " flu " and in every home 
on the compound there is sickness. Sister 
Eliza B. Miller is in the hospital in Bulsar. 
She has an attack of malaria and bronchitis. 
Two of our most promising 'girls died at 
Anklesvar of pneumonia. It was such a 
shock to all of us! These girls were in 
the Normal Training School at Ghodra, 
and were home for the Christmas vacation. 
We were looking forward to the time when 
they would finish their school work, and 
enter more fully the service for the Mas- 
ter. One cannot understand why these 
are taken from us, when we are so much 
in need of trained workers, yet we hum- 
bly bow in submission to the Divine will, 
believing that he will provide for our every 
need. 



From most of our mission stations come 
such encouraging reports concerning the 
" love-feast occasions " and the splendid 
" ingathering of precious souls." For this 
we are loud in our praises to the Divine 
Helper. India has a bright future before 
her. Do, not cease your praying, for the 
enemy also is hard at work to tear from 
the fold those who have been gathered 
in. Manifold temptations lie in the path- 
way of these who are coming from dark- 
ness into light. It means a struggle, a stiff, 
hard fight for such as would live pure, 
clean, godly lives, in the midst of such 
surroundings. 

je 

What a joyful day was Dec. 12 — Durbar 
Day — for our whole mission when word was 
sent from station to station that the " mis- 
sion party" had arrived in Bombay! The 
only sad feature about it was that our dear 
little Francesbai Holsopple was so ill that 
they stopped off at Dahanu, where she was 
placed under the competent care of Dr. 
Barbara Nickey, and Nurse Mohler, who 



84 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1920 



hurried to her from Bulsar. Dr. Cottrell 
had been to Bombay to administer at once 
to her needs, and then all arrangements 
were made for the stop-off at Dahanu. 
We are so happy to report that, at this 
writing, she is on the mend, and, if all goes 
as planned they will be able to go on soon 
to the place assigned them for service. 
As soon as they are able to proceed to Vali 
Station, Bro. Arnold and family will take 
up work at Anklesvar Station. At present 
Bro. Lichty is very busy doing station 
work, and looking after the evangelistic 
campaign in the whole of Raj Pipla State. 
Truly his restoration to health and 
strength is a " miracle of grace " ! We 
do praise God for it all! 

Sisters Replogle and Kintner are " fitting 
in " most beautifully. They are getting a 
splendid hold of the Gujarati language un- 
der the " direct method." All of us are sup- 
posed to " break the backbone " of the lan- 
guage the first year. We do rejoice that all 
of these have come to us, and that these 
two " new missionaries " are getting on so 
well, from the start, with the language. 
Praise the Lord for the future workers 
for "needy India"! 

How eagerly we look forward to the 
coming of the rest of our mission party! 
While we do rejoice in that some of the 
stations have received relief by the coming 
of these workers, yet we do pray, and pray 
most earnestly, that the rest may come to 
us speedily. The Jalalpor Station is so 
much in need of a family. Bro. Forneys 
have been assigned to this station. How 
eagerly we look forward to their coming 
here! Do continue to plead with God, 
that continued grace and strength may, be 
given so that we may be able to " hold 
out " till relief arrives. To " hold the 
fort " under normal conditions was a heavy 
strain for a woman, yet the strain and the 
great responsibilities were much intensified 
when this " student question " came on us. 
It has been only by the grace of God 
and the "prayers of the faithful" that we 
have been able thus far to " steer our little 
bark " through these stormy waters, and 
keep her from being dashed to pieces by 
the heavy waves of fierce opposition. We 



are so grateful also to Bro. Stover for the 
help he has rendered in so many ways. 
The government officials are busy these 
days getting all the facts they can to " fight 
these opposers." The report will soon 
be in the hands of the governor of Bom- 
bay, if not already, and then we will see the 
end. The opposers; have petitioned the 
governor, hence the need of all these facts 
and statistics. May victory for the Lord 
be the result of all this, and may it mean 
the opening of these doors, so tightly 
closed lo, these many years! 

Notwithstanding the fact that all has 
been done to break up the work of the 
Christians here, we had 189 present at our 
Christmas service in Jalalpor, seventy-six 
at Machad on Christmas afternoon, and 
fully 350 at Bhat on the following Saturday 
when we had our service there. For this 
we do feel to praise God and take cour- 
age and never give up the fight for truth 
and right. 

There are so many things you should 
know, but for the present we beg you all 
to be patient and wait till relief comes, so 
we can " let go the oars " long enough to 
write you all about it. All who have so 
kindly sent " gifts of love and messages 
of love " will, in due time, receive a mes- 
sage telling how all was used. I am anx- 
ious to write at length now, but so long as 
relief is not forthcoming and the " fight is 
on," I dare not " let go." I am sure you 
will all understand. I take this way to 
tell you. 

Pray for the work and all the workers! 

Thank you one and all, and God bless 
you! 

Jalalpor, Surat Dist., Jan. 3. 

Pluck wins! It always win!s Though 
days be slow, and nights be dark 'twixt 
days that come and go. Still, pluck will 
win! Its average is sure! He wins the 
most who can the most endure! Who 
faces issues! He who never shirks! Who 
waits, and watches and always works! — 
Anon. 



March 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



85 



□ 



©Ijf Qpnrkpra' Qnrnfr 



□ 



The editor invites helpful contributions for this department of the Visitor 



Mission Study for Juniors 



Mrs. Silva M. Beckner 



THE term juniors will include the 
children from the ages of three to 
twelve. Why is it necessary to be- 
gin so soon? When you want your child 
to become an expert in music, or athletics, 
or whatever it may be, you will begin his 
training as soon as possible. Then it is 
not too soon to commence teaching mis- 
sions in infancy. The child needs to know 
all that is possible for him to know as he 
grows older. The knowledge he acquires 
while in his earliest years will stay by him 
the longest. We take the children into 
the Sunday-school classes when they are 
three years old, and even younger, before 
they know anything about sin. We teach 
them about the kind Heavenly Father's 
care. This is a very apt time in life also to 
begin teaching about the little non-Chris- 
tian boys and girls who are their brothers 
and sisters with only a difference in the 
color of the skin. The little brown, black 
and yellow-faced children are just as ready 
and eager to learn as the white-faced ones 
are. Just so are they eager to learn of the 
Jesus whom we worship, if they have some 
one to teach them. 

The junior will begin to read as soon as 
possible. He will not always wait for his 
parent or some one to pick out a book for 
him. He will get it in the library, at school, 
or wherever he can. His mind is ready to 
receive all the impressions that can be made 
on it in early life. The parents of the child, 
the Sunday-school superintendent and 
teacher and the day-school teacher, all 
have a great responsibility and opportunity 
in directing the young mind and leading 
it into right channels. Each one must be 
a wise teacher to choose the right for him. 

The constant call of the General Mission 
Board and from the workers on the field 



for more workers is one reason why our 
boys and girls should study missions. We 
become most like the things we think and 
read about. We have so many books and 
magazines full of the mission spirit that 
we cannot keep away from it, even if we 
choose to do so. A mother once spoke to 
her small son as to how he must do when 
he became a preacher. She kept an ideal 
before his mind continually in his young 
days and when he became a man he took 
it for granted that he must be a preacher. 
The Lord called him and he followed. Talk 
to the child about the things he should read 
and is reading, and you will find him fol- 
lowing in those steps. The call to the mis- 
sion field will come to those who know 
and realize the need there. We know the 
needs best by making a study of the fields 
and workers there. The child may have a 
call while still young, and as he passes on 
through life, preparing himself for larger 
usefulness in the world, or as we often say, 
" chooses his life work," he will not get 
away from that call which came to him as 
he first saw and learned the needs of those 
great harvest fields. The parent may have 
taught him that one of these fields is where 
he will spend the greater part of his life 
after he has had his preparation. 

An evening's program may be given by 
the Mission Study Class in church, where 
the members are scattered and cannot meet 
regularly for recitation. The boys will be 
glad to assume the different characters they 
have studied, or a country may be repre- 
sented by acting out different parts of the 
stories. Give them a chance for they are 
hungry and eager to get the information of 
the fields. The Sunday-school teacher may 
take a few minutes from a recitation, or 
the superintendent at the opening or clos- 



S6 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1920 



ing of the school for a review of a few 
chapters read at home during the week. 
The Junior Band leader may find it- very- 
profitable to take up a book and study it 
with the children, instead of their regular 
programs. An interesting program may be 
outlined each evening if ' each member of 
the class is responsible for a certain part 
of it. 

Who shall be the leader in these classes? 
Have you some one in your locality or 
church who is especially fond of children? 
Have you some one who is interested in 
missions? Give that one an opportunity. 
He must be a good leader and a good 
Christian; one who understands children 
and will enter into the mission spirit with 
them. The little tots who cannot read will 
need to have the stories told or read to 
them. The mother, as she tells the bed- 



time stories, will find good and interesting 
stories in various books. 

The General Mission Board can name 
suggestive books for study in these classes. 
Certificates often are a stimulus for keep- 
ing up the work. At the close of the study, 
promotion exercises may be held and cer- 
tificates or diplomas may be presented to 
those who have satisfactorily completed the 
work. The Mission Study Class, if prop- 
erly conducted, is only a beginning to mis- 
sionary activity. Students will then follow 
it up by home reading and cultivate a taste 
for more of that kind of literature. The 
General Mission Board will be glad to lend 
a helping hand to all who are interested 
in mission study. 

A monthly mission paper, Everyland, is 
a large help in mission study. It has stories 
from all countries. No matter what coun- 







Additional Reading 



Junior UksionStudu 

THIS CERTIFICATE IS AWARDED TO 




umareqa&m ,m me JiaU sfi_ 



w famuvnf Ms; Course in Missions ^y^ 
^General Mission Board. Church of the Brethren 

b Testimony Whereof Me atowm^ .Jbown, tjQemd^Jm earned 

4& ejMeM^M^////A/iMcedmi(^r/M ydw/f- $ — 



St/ucatiena/ Secretary 



The New Junior Mission Study Certificate 

In view of the many junior classes the above certificate has been prepared and will be awarded 
to all juniors who are faithful in their class work. No examination is required for the junior course 
but the recommendation of the teacher must accompany the request for a certificate. A fee of ten 
cents to partially cover expenses is required for each certificate issued. The names of the pupils 
should be sent so the certificate can be completed before it leaves the office of the General Mission 
Board. , 



March 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



87 



try they are studying they will be sure to 
find some aid from this little magazine. It 
should be in every home. Subscription 
price, $1.50. Order from Brethren Pub- 
lishing House. 
McPherson, Kans. 

ANNOUNCEMENT CONCERNING THE 
SHARE PLAN 

This new method of support being used 
in India at the present time has been well 
received by organizations and individuals 
in our church. The seventy shares at An- 



klesvar are all subscribed and more than 
forty shares have been issued from the 
Vyara station. It is the desire of the India 
Mission that each station be supported by 
this method eventually. Those who are 
able to subscribe for shares under this 
plan are urged to do so at once. The Gen- 
eral Mission Board, Elgin, 111., will gladly 
answer your questions concerning this 
support. It will be necessary to issue thirty 
more shares to complete the seventy nec- 
essary for the Vyara station. Then the 
Bulsar station will be placed on the Share 
Plan next. Shares will be issued from the 
Bulsar station now upon request. 



Mission Study Graduation Programs 



Program of Mission Study Class No. 2, 
Chippewa Church, Ohio, Dec. 30, 1919 

Mrs. H. M. Hoff, Pres. Local Miss. Com. 

Song "O Zion Haste" 

(While Class marched in) 

Responsive Reading 

Quinter Renecker — Leader 

Prayer Frank Younker 



The Great Communion . 

Class Song — No. 217 Kingdom Songs No. 2 

Recitation Hulda Leaman 

Map Talk on Our India Field.. Earl Miller 
Presentation of Framed Certificate of In- 
dia Share in Anklesvar Station, 

Ira Shafer. 

A Letter Read from Bro. W. B. Stover.. 

Mary Miller 

Recitation — " Inasmuch " .... Mary Shafer 
" Missiongrams "' . . President L. M. Com. 
Handing out of " Diplomas " 



Program for Junior Mission Study Class, 

Feb. 8, 1920. Stringtown S. S., Wol- 

ford Schoolhouse, First District 

of West Virginia 

Music Help Somebody Today 

Scripture Gems and Concert Reading 

Prayer 

Ladies' Quartette, 

Paul Leaman Day of Rest and Gladness 



Talk — Foreigners in America and Home 

Missions, Mary E. Shickel 

Song by Junior Girls, . . . .Something to Do 

Declamation — William Carey as an Educa- 
tor in India Margie Penington 

Song by School, All Over the World 

Declamation — David Livingstone, Africa's 
Great Explorer, Daisy Wolford 

The Pioneer Missionary to the New Heb- 
rides Nulan Wolford 

Song By Juniors, 

Class Address Rev. Claude Murray We'll Not Give Up the Bible 

Three of the class being absent, the Declamation— Healing Soul and Body in 
program was given as above. China, Nuda Cooper 

There were ten graduates. Quartette, Victory Is Coming 

(Editor's Note. — These two Mission Study programs above were clipped from Missionary Com- 
mittee reports sent to the General Mission Board. They are very typical of programs that may be ren- 
dered at the conclusion of a Mission Study Course. Tke Chippewa church in Ohio is typical of our coun- 
try churches and the Stringtown Sunday-school consists of a small number of earnest workers who wor- 
ship in a schoolhouse. 

These programs were not sent in for publication but the editor appreciates these signs of activity 
in the churches and will be glad to give recognition of splendid work done in any church of the Brother- 
hood.) 



88 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1920 



Middle Creek's Mission Study Classes 



W.J. 

ABOUT the year 1915 a certain con- 
secrated Christian mother, who was 
a willing worker, with a clear vision 
and a great big heart, decided to organize 
a Mission Study Class, and take the course 
herself while she was teaching the class. 

Each year since then she has graduated 
a class, with the exception of 1918. That 
year she prevailed upon the pastor to teach 
the class, and he became a victim of influ- 
enza, leaving the work unfinished. 

Last summer she read Leaflet No. 5, 
" Mission Study for Juniors." Here she 
got the idea of having mission study class- 
es on Sunday evening, in place of the reg- 
ular Christian Workers' Society. 

Result: Four classes were organized, 
one of men and another of women, both 
studying " Christian Heroism in Heathen 
Lands"; a class of younger folks, studying 
" Soldiers of the Prince," and a fourth 
class, of boys and girls, overjoyed with 
" Mook," a true Chinese story. 

Thirteen of the class in " Soldiers of the 
Prince " have already finished the course, 
and are waiting impatiently for their cer- 
tificates. They are now studying "Jack 



Hamilton 

and Janet in the Philippines," while the 
other classes finish their courses. 

The four classes have a total enrollment 
of forty. These, with all that have gradu- 
ated in the days gone by, give us a large 
" Roster of Mission Study Graduates." 

But, you ask, how do you get such a re- 
sponse of students? By keeping the sub- 
ject of missions before them continuously. 
Missionary programs, including pageants, 
are given from time to time by the young 
people and children. Every Mission Study 
Class is graduated with appropriate exer- 
cises. The Sunday-school library commit- 
tee subscribes for Everyland, the children's 
missionary paper. The larger classes give 
their offering on the first Sunday of each 
month to missions, and all of the offerings 
of the little folks go to missions. 

In your church the one whom God has 
chosen to be the mother of the mission 
study cause doubtless goes by a different 
name. But in our church she is commonly 
known as Mrs. E. D. Walker. However, 
her college chums will remember her in the 
former years at Juniata as Laura B. 
Speicher. 



The Voice at the Turn of the Road 



" Ah, here is another turn of the road, 

Another league is gone; 
Take a strong new grip and grasp of your 
load, 
And then — go on! Go on! 
For we follow a Voice down the long, long 
road 
That travels hither and yon, 
And the Voice is the voice of the hastening 
years-^ 
'Goon! Goon! Goon!' 

"And the Voice is here at the turn ot the 
road 
Of the highway of the years; 
And there's nothing to fear in the tone of 
the voice, 
Though it speaks from the midst of fears. 
There are blasted cliffs and chasms of 
dread 
In the journey we have gone; 
There are stony hills on the road ahead; 
But the Voice says, 'On! Go on!' 



" There are gardens abloom on the way we 
have come, 
And fountains, and arbors of shade; 
There are bleak, dark pines in the cold 
snows, dumb, 
And the thunder-smitten glade; 
There are orchards of bloom and firs of 
gloom 
On the journey we have gone; 
There are bloom and gloom on the way 
ahead; 
But the Voice says, 'On! Go on!' 

" We are glad for the Voice at the turn of 
the road, 
'Tis tuned to the heart of man; 
It has cheered his way, and lightened his 
load, 
From the day when the world began. 
For the heart of man said, 'Yea," to the 
Voice 
In all the years that are gone ; 
And its words are a music that thrill in 
his blood — 
'Go on! Go on! Go on!'" 

—Sam Walter Foss. 



March 

1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



89 




During the month of January the Board sent out 
138,078 pages of tracts. 

Corrections: The $25 credited to Band of Hope, 
Alvordton Sunday-school, for India Boarding School, 
should have been put to India Share Plan. The 
$7 credited to Salem Congregation in the January 
issue for China Boys' School should have been cred- 
ited to Brother and Sister John H. Rinehart for 
China Orphans. $60 previously reported, credited to 
Woodland Sunday-school, for India Native Worker, 
should be for the support of a China Native Worker. 
$9.13 credited to Gormania Congregation in the Feb- 
ruary Visitor for World-Wide Missions, should be 
credited to Fairview C. W., in Western Maryland. 

WORLD-WIDE 

Pennsylvania— $789.90 

Southern District, Congregation 

Falling Springs, $ 10 00 

Sunday-school 

Victor Bible Class, Carlisle, 15 00 

Individuals 

Mary Dottman, 50c; M. O. Myers, $5.50; 
Helen Price. $5; Mattie Hollinger, $2; Re- 
ceipt No. 46710, $1 14 00 

Western District, Congregation 

Manor 66 00 

Sunday-schools 

Diamondville. $5; Roxbury, $350; True 

Blue Class, Elk Lick, $15, 370 00 

Aid Society 

Cornelius Mission, 100 

Individuals 

I. G. Miller, $1.20; Samuel C. Johnson, $35; 
Sarah A. Johnson, $2; Mr. and Mrs. J. W. 
Rummel, $2; Jerome Blough, 50c; D. L. 
Miller, $6; Herman Rummel, $5; C. C. 

Brown, $10; Mrs. Harriet Reed, $10, 71 70 

Middle District, Congregations 

Leamersville, $9.19; Dry Valley, $3; Sny- 
der Crossroads Church, $4.50, 16 69 

Individuals 

Thomas Hardin and Son, $1; Alice Baker, 
50c; Samuel Snyder, $3; James C. Wine- 
land, $1; Daniel Replogle, $3; John Snow- 
berger, $3; John R. Stayer, $3; Mary A. 

Kinsey, $10 24 50 

Eastern District, Congregations 

Big Swatara. $59.60; Peach Blossom, $4.55; 

Spring Grove, $14.12 78 27 

Sunday-schools 

Mabel Eshelman's Class, Palmyra, $5.72; 
Boys' Class, Palmyra, $3.25; East Fairview, 

$25; Ridgely, $16.50, 50 47 

Individuals 

A. A. Price, $5; Cassie Yoder, $1; Receipt 
No. 46502, $10; Nathan Martin, 50c; Timna 
Reutchler, $2; Dan Royer, $2; J. J. Oiler, 
$30; C. V. Bonkard, $2; Abram Fackler, $1, 53 50 

Southeastern District, Congregations 

Park^rford Cong., $6.61; Coventry Cong., 

$6.60; Upper Dublin Church, $5.56, 18 77 

Virginia— $251.70 

Northern District, Congregations 

Flat Rock, $40; Unity, $51; Mill Creek, 

$66.65, 157 65 

Individuals 

D. R. and S. Fannie Miller, 25c; John H. 
and Mary C. Kline, $5; David W. Wampler, 
$2; D. S. Neff, $1.50; J. N. Smith, $1; Mrs. 
P. J. Craun, 50c; Martha Kline, $1; David 
M. Good, $2.50; P. S. Thomas, $4.50; Cather- 
ine Wampler, $3, 2125 

Second District, Individuals 

N. I. Buck, $2; S. A. and Hattie E. Gar- 
ber, $1; E. D. Kindig, $1; M. D. Hess and 
Salome C. Hess, 25c; Edna D. Miller, $15; 
Jane A. Zimmerman, $2.50; Mary S. Zim- 
merman, $2.50; D. S. Thomas, $1; S. Frank 
Cox, 50c; Barbara A. Wampler, $1.10; Fan- 
nie A. Wampler. $1.10; Bessie B. Wampler, 
$1; Bessie V. Wampler, 10c; E. G. Wine. 
50c; S. N. Wine, 25c; S. I. Stoner, $3.70; 



A. B. and Elizabeth R. Glick, 50c; Wm. H. 
Sipe, $10; John L. and Sarah C. Driver, $1; 
S. T. Glick, $1; Samuel Garber, $3; Mattie 
V. Caricofe, 50c; Bettie E. Caricofe, 50c; 

John D. and Elizabeth C. Huddle, $1, 51 00 

First District, Individuals 

Mrs. C. W. Mautzy, $2; T. S. Moherman, 

$1.80, 3 80 

Eastern District, Sunday-school 

Nokesville 10 00 

Individual 

Mrs. C. R. Frick, . , 5 00 

Southern District, Individual 

Mrs. B. W. Wimmer, 3 00 

Indiana— $311.19 

Northern District, Congregation 

New Paris, 77 15 

Sunday-school 

Rock River, 17 32 

Individuals 

Mrs. D. W. Ecker, $4; Mr. Truman Fifer, 
$1; D. B. Hartman, 27c; Annetta Johnson, 
$2.50; Melvin D. Neff, $10; E. M. Rowe, $1; 

Jacob B. Neff, $5, 23 77 

Southern District, Congregation 

Beech Grove, 121 50 

Individuals 

Celesta Miller, $3; D. W. Stoner, $1; Mrs. 
Ida Kintner, $8; John E. Metzger, $5; Wm. 
Stout, $5; Flora A. Benham, $13; Hannot 
Woodard, $1; John Herr and wife, $3; John 

L. Childs, $10 49 00 

Middle District, Sunday-schools 

Willing Workers, Sidney, $12.35; Sala- 

monie, $3.70, 16 05 

Individuals 

Odis P. and Looa M. Clingenpeel, $2; J. 
D. Rife, $1.20; Isaac L. Shultz, $1.20; M. E. 

and Nora Miller, $1; Emma Fair, $1, 6 40 

Ohio— $142.44 

Northeastern District, Congregations 

Black River, $5; Chippewa, $34, 39 00 

Sunday-school 

Secondary Dept., Hartville 102 

Individuals 

Sarah Dupler, $15.38; Sadie Moherman, $1; 

J. H. Cupler, $1.20; J. S. Leckrone, $1, 18 58 

Southern District, Individuals 

J. B. Deeter, $1; Elmer Brumbaugh, 50c; 
Emma Kilmer, $5; Van B. Wright, 50c; Re- 
ceipt No. 46719, $50; Emanuel Shank, $1.50; ' 

John H. Rinehart, $1.20, 59 70 

Southwestern District, Individual 

W. C. Teeter 1 20 

Northwestern District, Congregation 

Lick Creek 8 24 

Individuals 

Mrs. E. M. McFadden, $3; S. H. Smith, 
$10; L. E. Kauffman, $1.20; Lester Heisey, 
50c, 14 70 

Illinois— $242.48 

Northern District, Congregations 

Dixon, $10.25; Mt. Morris, $87.63, 97 88 

Individuals 

Lydia Bricknell, $5; E. P. Trostle, $5; A. 
L. Moats, $1.20; Oliver D. Lahman, $30; 
D. Barrick, $2; H. W. Filer, $75; Rena S. 
Miller, $1.50; S. C. Miller, $3; Collin P. 
Puterbaugh, $5; P. H. Graybill, $2.40; J. 

W. Kitson, 50c, 130 60 

Southern District, Individuals 

Mrs. J. B. Shaffer, $1; Mary Hester, $1; 
T. A. Smeltzer, $1; S. S. Blough, $1; James 
Wirt, $5; Hannah M. Wirt, $5 14 00 

Iowa— $117.62 

Northern District, Individuals 

Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Culler, $10; E. C. 
Whitmer and wife, $25; David Brallier and 
wife, $10; D. F. Landis, $1.50; Hannah C. 
Messer, $1; Conrad Messer, $2.50; Samuel 
Fike, $12; Louisa Messer, $2.50, 64 50 



90 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1920 



Sunday-school 

Home Dept., Greene, 5 00 

Middle District, Individuals 

Mrs. Melissa C. Longhenry, $5; Edwin L. 

West, $10, . 15 00 

Southern District, Congregation 

Mt. Etna, 33 12 

Maryland— $176.48 

Middle District, Congregation 

Longmcadow, 34 75 

Western District, Congregation 

Maple Grove, 6 25 

Eastern District, Sunday-schools 

Westminster S. S., in Meadow Branch 
Cong., $39.08; Rocky Ridge S. S., Monocacy 

Cong., $20, 59 08 

Individuals 

Amos Wampler, $1; Joshua Armacost, $4; 
Annie R. Stoner, $15; Jas. T. Thomas (de- 
ceased), $5; C. E. Wills, $1; Blanche 

Phlegar, $50.40, 76 40 

California— $75.64 

Northern District, Congregation 

Golden Gate, 23 00 

Individuals 

Henry S. Sheller, $5; Martin H. Miller, 

$20, ;. 25 00 

Southern District, Individuals 

D. L. Forney, $3.14; W. I. T. Hoover, 50c; 
Mrs. Elizabeth Minnich, $3; Mary M. Hep- 
ner, $5; Elizabeth Forney, $3; Edmund For- 
ney, $3; I. G. Cripe, $10, 27 64 

Missouri— $61.20 

Middle District, Congregation 

Rockingham 1 00 

Individuals 

Elda Gauss, $5; O. P. Hoover, $6; J. P. 
Harris and wife, $4.50; Nannie C. Wagner, 

$2.50; Wm. H. Wagner, $2.50, 20 50 

Northern District, Congregation 

Pleasant View, 23 00 

Individual 

Mrs. Eliza Dukes, 1 70 

Southern District, Individual 

C. W. Gitt, 15 00 

Kansas— $288.42 

Southwestern District, Individuals 

M. M. Morelock, $2; Michael Keller, 50c, 2 50 

Southeastern District, Individual 

Elizabeth Patterson, 5 00 

Northeastern District, Sunday-schools 

Washington, $16.36; Junior S. S. Class, 

Sabetha, $6, , 22 36 

Individuals 

J. A. Sheets and wife, $150; J. W. Mosier, 
$58; George A. Fishburn, 50c; Sadie Early, 

$15, 223 50 

Northwestern District, Congregation 

Maple Grove, 25 00 

Sunday-school 

Victor, 9 56 

Individual 

Jacob Sloniker, 50 

Colorado— $97.16 

Northeastern District, Individuals 

Mrs. Ella Main, $1; S. P. Hylton, $26.16, 27 16 

Sunday-school 

Sterling, 60 00 

Southeastern District, Individual 

Albert Shade 10 00 

Nebraska— $40.75 
Congregations 

Beatrice, $25; South Beatrice, $9.25, 34 25 

Christian Workers' Society 

Lincoln, 4 00 

Individuals 

Cornelius Kessler, $1; Elmer Sutphin, 50c; 

Lydia Evans, $1 2 50 

Idaho— $121.55 
Sunday-schools 

Weiser, $20; Nampa, $4.12; Twin Falls, 

$41.93, 66 05 

Individuals 

Jacob Kircher, $50; Lanson and Franey 
Clanin, $2; Nora E. Zimmerman, $3; A. R. 

Fike, 50c 55 50 

South Dakota— $71.00 
Individuals 

J. W. Kerkendall, $2; W. C. Kimmel, $15; 



D. R. Baldwin, $54, 7100 

North Dakota— $87.00 
Congregations 

Egeland, $28.50; Ellison, $50, 78 50 

Individuals 

D. M. Shorb, 50c; Henry Kile, $5; Eliza- 
beth Kile, $3 8 50 

West Virginia— $72.63 

Second District, Congregations 

Zion, $2; Valley River, $2; Benton Terry, 
$4.51; Ross Chapel, $12.50; Bethany Church, 
$11.10; Wades Chapel, $6.02; Shiloh Union 

Chapel, $8.53, 46 66 

Individual 

J. F. Ross, 20 00 

First District, Congregation 

Alleghany, 5 10 

Individual 

A. A. Rotruck, 90 

Oklahoma— $420.75 
Congregations 

Enid, $114; Washita, $14.75, 128 75 

Individual 

Receipt No. 46879, 292 00 

Minnesota — $55.60 
Congregation 

Root River, 48 60 

Individuals 

C. A. Shook, $2; Mr. and Mrs. D. Broad- 
water, $5, 7 00 

Oregon— $33.72 
Congregations 

Portland, $23.72; Mabel, $10, 33 72 

Tennessee— $9.00 
Congregation 

Limestone, 6 50 

Individual 

Mrs. J. J. Emmert, 2 50 

Washington— $32.50 
Individuals 

J. S. Zimmerman, 50c; Nora A. Wiley, $1; 
P. H. and Hattie Hertzog, $20; Macdon- 

alds, $10.50; E. S. Gregory, 50c, 32 50 

Montana— $71.81 
Congregation 

Grandview, 71 81 

Louisiana — $1.20 
Individual 

W. B. Weodard, 1 20 

New Mexico— $5.00 
Individual 

Samuel Weimer, 5 00 

New York— $1.50 
Individuals 

J. S. Noffsinger, 50c; Mrs. Estella Bissell, 

$1, 1 50 

Delaware— $46.15 
Individual 

Wm. A. Hockstedler, 46 15 

Arkansas — $100.00 
Individual 

L. W. Stong, ' 100 00 

North Carolina— $2.00 
Individual 

H.-M. Griffith, 200 

Oregon— $9.89 
Sunday-school 

Birthday Offering, Ashland, 9 89 

Total for the month $ 3,736 31 

Conference offering, 710 90 

Previously reported, 159,050 75 

Total for the year so far, $163,497 96 

HOME MISSIONS 
Ohio— $50.00 

Southern District, Individual 

Receipt No. 46718, 50 00 

Virginia— $5.00 

Eastern District, Individual 

Mary Fanester, 5 00 

Total for the month, $ 55 00 

Previously reported, 348 16 

Total to date, $ 403 16 



March 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



91 



INDIA MISSION 
California— $55.00 

Northern District, Individual 

A Friend : 50 00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Junior Dept., La Verne, 5 00 

Colorado— $3.00 

Southeastern District, Individual 
Mrs. Therese Lohmiller, 3 00 

Kansas— $5.00 

Southeastern District, Individual 

Elizabeth Patterson, 5 00 

Michigan— $.25 
Individual 

Jos. A. Cook, 25 

Montana— $1.05 
Congregation 

Grand View, 1 05 

Ohio— $7.15 

Northeastern District, Congregation 

Chippewa 5 00 

Sunday-school 

Primary Dept., Hartville, 2 15 

Oregon— $5.35 
Congregation 

Portland, 35 

Individuals 

A. E. Troyer and wife 5 00 

Pennsylvania— $146.00 
Eastern District, Individuals 

Receipt No. 46503, $5; Elizabeth H. Hei- 

sey, $100 105 00 

Middle District, Congregation 

Juniata Park, 13 50 

Southern District, Individual 

Receipt No. 46712 2 00 

Southeastern District, Individual 

Sarah M. Dogler 100 

Sunday-school 

Royersford, 24 50 

Virginia— $5.00 

Eastern District, Individual 

Mary F. Fanester, 5 00 

Washington— $63.18 
Congregation 

Yakima, 58 68 

Sunday-school 

Primary Dept., Sunny Slope, 4 50 

West Virginia— $1.00 
Second District, Individuals 

C. W. O'Brien and wife 1 00 

Total for the month, $ 29198 

Previously reported, 1,473 84 

Total to date $ 1,765 82 

INDIA BOARDING SCHOOL 
Pennsylvania— $467.47 

Southeastern District, Aid Society 

Parker Ford, 5 00 

Middle District, Congregation 

Cherry Lane 35 00 

Sunday-schools 

Bethel, $35; Leamersville, Dorcas Class, 
$5; Willing Workers' Class, Clover Creek, 
$35; Young Men's Bible Class, 1st Church, 

Altoona, $12.50, 87 50 

Individual 

Mrs. A. J. Detwiler 35 00 

Western District, Congregation 

Moxham, 59 59 

Christian Workers' Societies 

Indian Creek, $25; Penn Run, $20.04; Mcy- 

ersdale, $35, 80 04 

Sunday-schools 

Upstreamers' Class, Elk Lick, $6.10; Dia- 
mondville, $5; Friendly Class, Pike S. S., 

$25, : 36 10 

Aid Society 

Meyersdale 30 00 

Individuals 

A Brother and Sister, Clymer 35 00 

Eastern District, Individual 

Mrs. S. R. Geyer, 35 00 

Congregations 

Peach Blossom, 30c; Elizabethtown, $11.44, 11 74 

Sunday-school 

Maple Glen, 17 50 



Missouri— $284.17 

Northern District, Individuals 

Mrs. Wm. Norton, $35; Ira Hoover, $35; 
Hattie Pugsley, $35; John E. Thurman, 
$35; Thos. Prather, $35; Mrs. W. Landes, 

$35, 210 00 

Christian Workers' Society 

Wakenda, 4 17 

Sunday-school 

W. F. Early's Class, 35 00 

Southern District, Individual 

Nathan Altis, 35 00 

Indiana— $56.73 

Northern District, Sunday-schools 

Cedar Creek, $6.87; Walnut S. S., Primary 

Dept., $21.25, 28 12 

Middle District, Individuals 

A Brother, $9.11; Miss Edith Lees, $7, . . . . 16 11 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Atlanta, 12 50 

Maryland— $23.85 

Eastern District, Sunday-schools 

Young Ladies' Class, Rocky Ridge, $3.60; 
Loyalty Class, Washington City, $20.25, ... 23 85 

Ohio— $90.97 
Southern District, Congregations 

East Dayton, $32; Sugar Hill, $10.59, 42 59 

Northwestern District, Congregation 

Blanchard, 19 00 

Sunday-school 

Willing Workers' Class, Silver Creek, .. 29 38 

Virginia— $75.00 
Northern District, Sunday-schools 

Willing Workers' Class, Mill Creek Cong., 

$35; Trout's Bible Class, Roanoke, $35, 70 00 

Southern District, Individual 

Sarah Hylton, 5 00 

Iowa— $60.00 

Southern District, Christian Workers 

Fairview, 35 00 

Middle District, Sunday-school 

Yale, 25 00 

Illinois— $90.85 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Primary Dept., Elgin, 38 85 

Individual 

Katherine Boyer 52 00 

Oregon— $27.10 
Congregation 

Portland, 2 10 

Sunday-school 

Friendship Class, Portland, 25 00 

Oklahoma— $38.00 
Individual 

Jennie M. Garber 38 00 

Arkansas— $35.00 

Northwestern District, Individual 

C. H. Brown, 35 00 

Nebraska — $20.00 
Sunday-school 

Beatrice, 20 00 

Washington — $70.00 
Sunday-school 

Junior Boys and Girls, East Wenatchce, 70 00 

Montana— $2.30 
Congregation 

Grand View, 2 30 

Kansas— $16.50 

Southeastern District, Christian Workers 

Independence 10 00 

Southwestern District, Christian Workers 

Newton City, 6 50 

Colorado— $19.00 

Northeastern District, Individual 

Mrs. H. C. Long, 10 00 

Southeastern District, Individual 

Sister Ella Smith, 9 00 

West Virginia— $1.00 
Second District, Individuals 

C. \V. O'Brien and wife, 1 00 

Total for the month, $ 1,377 94 

Previously reported, 5,423 40 

Total to date $ 6,801 34 



92 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1920 



INDIA SHARE PLAN 
Missouri— $800.00 

Northern District, Aid Societies 

North Rockingham, $50; Dorcas, $50, .... 100 00 
Individuals 

George Hoover, $50; H. M. Brubaker, $50; 
G. W. Ellenberger, $50; Rev. Perry Wil- 
liams, $50; Oscar Early, $50; W. F. Early, 
$50; Roy Shelly, $50; J. A. Early, $50; E. 
J. Rodabaugh, $50; J. S. Bowman, $50; S. E. 
Hagan, $50; W. G. Andes, $50; Edw. J. 

Early, $50 • 650 00 

Sunday-school 

S. E. Hagan's S. S. Class, 50 00 

Pennsylvania— $625.00 

Middle District, Sunday-schools 

Sunday-schools of Middle District, $250; 

Snake Spring, $50 300 00 

Individual 

Samuel Gochenour, 100 00 

Congregation 

Roaring Spring 50 00 

Eastern District, Individual 

Receipt No. 46501, 50 00 

Congregation 

Hatfield, 25 00 

Southern District, Individual 

Jacob G. Aldinger, . .• 50 00 

Western District, Sunday-school 

Golden Rule Class, Maple Spring S. S.,.. 50 00 

California— $50.00 
Southern District, Sunday-school 

Hemet, 50 00 

Ohio— $35.00 

Northwestern District, Individuals 

Edith Moyer, $25; Sarah and Nancy 

Smith, $10, 35 00 

Kansas— $25.00 

Northeastern District, Aid Society 

Ottawa, 12 50 

Christian Workers 

Ottawa, 12 50 

North Dakota— $100.00 
Individual 

Mrs. Mary E. Weaver, 100 00 

West Virginia— $62.50 

Second District, Individuals 

J. W. and Elva Hevener, $50; Mr. and 

Mrs. T. T. Valentine, $12.50, 62 50 

Oregon— $25.00 
Sunday-school 

Newberg 25 00 

Illinois— $25.00 

Southern District, Individual 

Elmer M. Hersch, 25 00 

Indiana— $25.00 

Middle District, Sunday-school 

Loon Creek, 25 00 

Nebraska— $13.00 
Christian Workers 

Alvo, 13 00 

Michigan— $12.50 
Individuals 

Dr. and Mrs. C. M. Mott 12 50 

Iowa— $10.00 

Individual 
M. T. Kimmel, 10 00 

Total for the month, $ 1,808 00 

Previously reported, 1,928 50 

Total to date, $ 3,736 50 

INDIA NATIVE WORKER 
Iowa— $232.00 

Northern District, Sunday-schools 

Volunteer Class, $42; South Waterloo, $60; 

Ivester Missionary Class, $80 182 00 

Middle District, Individuals 

D. W. and Laura Badger 30 00 

Sunday-school 

Dallas Center 20 00 

Maryland— $105.00 

Eastern District, Sunday-schools 

Meadow Branch, $60; Edge wood, $5; Cha- 
pel Class, Blue Ridge S. S., $40, 105 00 



Ohio— $35.50 

Northeastern District, Congregation 

Chippewa, 5 00 

Sunday-school 

Ladies' Bible Class, Canton Center *Cong., 30 50 

Illinois — $60.00 
Northern District, Congregation 

Junior Congregation, Elgin, 60 00 

Idaho — $60.00 
Congregation 

Boise Valley, -. 60 00 

Pennsylvania — $40.00 
Sunday-school 

Huntsdale, 40 00 

California— $30.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Reedley, 30 00 

Virginia— $30.00 

Second District, Individuals 

Wm. W. Wise and Brothers, 30 00 

Oregon— $20.00 
Christian Workers 

Myrtle Point, 20 00 

Indiana— $20.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

North Winona, 20 00 

Washington— $23.85 
Sunday-school 

Mt. Hope, 23 85 

Total for the month, $ 656 35 

Previously reported, 916 10 

Total to date, $ 1,572 45 

INDIA ORPHANAGE 
Pennsylvania— $150.58 

Western District, Sunday-schools 

Diamondville, $5; Beginners' Class, Rum- 
mel, $14.20; Primary Dept., Rummel, $17.61; 
Junior Boys and Girls, Rummel, $13.25; 
Intermediate Girls, Rummel, $6.19; Inter- 
mediate Boys, Rummel, $14.75; Truth Seek- 
ers' Class, Elk Lick, $10.58; Beginners' 
Class, Elk Lick, $5; Primary Class, Elk 

Lick, $5; Junior Class, Elk Lick, $5.10 96 68 

Middle District, Sunday-schools 

Primary Girls of 28th St. Ch., Altoona, 

$10; Pike, Middte Creek, $20, 30 00 

Individual 

Mrs. Hannah Puderbaugh, 3 90 

Southern District, Individual 

Nora Sieber Quasman, 20 00 

Washington— $25.00 
Congregation 

Yakima, 25 00 

Indiana— $16.55 
Sunday-school 

Juniors, Maple Grove, 16 55 

Michigan— $8.00 
Sunday-school 

Sunfield, 8 00 

Idaho— $20.00 
Sunday-school 

Twin Falls, 20 00 

Total for the month, $ 220 13 

Previously reported, 363 97 

Total to date, $ 584 10 

ANKLESVAR GIRLS' BOARDING SCHOOL 
Virginia— $102.00 

Northern District, Aid Societies 

Timberville, $22; West Mill Creek, $20; 

Dayton, $20; Unity, $40, .• 102 00 

Nebraska— $47.50 
Aid Societies 

Bethel, $25; Omaha, $5; Octavia, $15; Al- 
vo, $2.50, 47 50 

Maryland— $62.00 

Eastern District, Aid Societies 

Denton, $20; Edgewood, $20; Beaver Dam, 

$22, 62 00 

Illinois— $113.00 

Northern Illinois and Wisconsin 

Aid Societies of Northern Illinois and 
Wisconsin 113 00 



March 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



93 



Kansas— $32.50 

Northeastern District, 

Aid Societies of Northeastern Kansas, .. 32 50 

Pennsylvania— $30.00 
Middle District, Aid Society 

Lewistown, 30 00 

Iowa— $25.00 

Southern District Aid Societies, 25 00 

Florida-^12.50 
Aid Society 

Sebring 12 50 

Oregon— $5.00 
Aid Society 

Newberg, 5 00 

Total for the month $ 429 50 

Previously reported, 257 32 

Total to date, $ 686 82 

INDIA BOARDING SCHOOL BUILDING 

Pennsylvania — $25.00 

Western District, Congregation 

Ligonier, 19 00 

Sunday-schools 

Ligonier, 6 00 

Ohio— $29.22 

Southern District, Congregation 

Brookville, 27 22 

Sunday-school 

Young Ladies' Class, Lower Miami 2 00 

Indiana— $5.69 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Classes 5 and 6, Nappanee, 5 69 

Total for the month $ 59 91 

Previously reported 2135 

Total to date, $ 8126 

INDIA WIDOWS' HOME 
Nebraska — $5.00 

Individual 

C. R. Musselman 5 00 

West Virginia— $1.00 
Individuals 

C. W. O'Brien and wife, 1 00 

Total for the month $ 6 00 

Previously reported, 112 10 

Total to date, $ 118 10 

INDIA HOSPITAL 

North Dakota— $25.00 

Individual 

Mrs. Mary E. Weaver, 25 00 

Oregon— $15.51 
Congregation 

Portland, 15 51 

Pennsylvania — $2.06 

Eastern District, Congregation 

Peach Blossom, 2 06 

Total for the month, $ 42 57 

Previously reported 54 50 

Total to date, $ 97 07 

INDIA FAMINE RELIEF 
Ohio— $4.00 

Northeastern District, Individual 

Mary Fetter 4 00 

Pennsylvania — $7.55 
Southern District, Individual 

Receipt No. 46713, 1 00 

Eastern District, Sunday-school 

Denver, Springfield Cong., 6 55 

Kansas— $5.00 

Southeastern District, Individual 

Elizabeth Patterson, 5 00 

Total for the month, $ 16 55 

Previously reported, 6,601 30 

Total to date $ 6,607 85 



ANKLESVAR CHURCHHOUSE 
Iowa— $100.00 

Northern District, Congregation 
Sheldon 100 00 

Total for the month, $ 100 00 

INDIA SCHOOL DORMITORIES 
Colorado— $25.00 

Southeastern District, Congregation 
Wiley, 25 00 

Total for the month, $ 25 00 

Previously reported, 1,000 00 

Total to date, $ 1,025 00 

QUINTER MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 
Ohio— $10.00 

Southern District, Aid Society 

Lower Miami, 10 00 

Pennsylvania— $10.00 
Middle District, Individual 

Francis Baker, 10 00 

Total for the month, $ 20 00 

Previously reported, 596 25 

Total to date $ 616 25 

PING TING INDUSTRIAL BUILDING 
Michigan— $175.00 

Sunday-schools of Michigan, 175 00 

Total for the month, $ 175 00 

CHINA BOYS' SCHOOL 
Pennsylvania— $10.00 

Eastern District, Individual 

Receipt No. 46504, 5 00 

Middle District, Sunday-school 

Dorcas Class, Leamersville S. S., 5 00 

Oregon— $0.50 
Congregation 

Portland, 50 

Ohio— $5.00 

Northeastern District, Congregation 

Chippewa, 5 00 

Total for the month, 15 50 

Previously reported, 473 00 

Total to date, $ 488 50 

CHINA MISSION 
Pennsylvania— $115.97 

Eastern District, Individuals 

Mrs. R. D. Raffensperger, $1; Mrs. 
Amanda Hildebrand, 75c; Elizabeth 

Heisey, deceased, $100, 10175 

Southern District, Individual 

Receipt No. 46711, 2 00 

Christian Workers 

Carlisle, 6 00 

Western District, Individual, 

Libbie Hollopeter, 1 00 

Southeastern District, Individual 

Sarah M. Edgier, 100 

Middle District, Congregation 

Carson Valley, 4 00 

Individual 

W. M. Ulrich 22 

Indiana— $12.53 

Southern District, Individuals 

Mrs. Maggie Brumbaugh, $1; Ben 
Haldeman, 50c; Amanda Ausherman, $1, . 2 50 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

St. Joseph Valley S. S., 10 03 

Washington— $29.50 
Sunday-school 

Primary Dept. Sunny Slope S. S., 4 50 

Congregation 

Yakima, 25 00 

Kansas— $5.50 

Northern District, Individual 

Jessie H. Winder, 5 50 

Ohio— $5.00 

Northeastern District, Congregation 
Chippewa, 5 00 



94 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1920 



Virginia— $5.00 

Eastern District, Individual 

Mary F. Fanester, 5 00 

Iowa— $1.00 

Northern District, Individual 

Lydia Ommen, 100 

West Virginia— $1.00 

Second District, Individuals 

C. W. O'Brien and wife, 100 

Colorado — $3.00 

Southeastern District, Individual 
Therese Lohmiller, 3 00 

Tennessee— $1.00 

Individual 

Edith Clark, 1 00 

North Dakota— $50.00 

Individual 
Mrs. Mary E. Weaver, '. 50 00 

Oregon— $0.50 

Congregation 

Portland, 50 

Canada— $0.50 
Individual 

Mrs. C. S. Blough, 50 

California— $50.00 

Northern District, Individual 

A Friend, 50 00 

Montana— $1.00 
Congregation 

Grand View, 1 00 

Oklahoma— $1.00 
Individual 

J. W. Murray, 1 00 

Total for the month, $ 282 50 

Previously reported, 1,012 54 

Total to date $ 1,295 04 

CHINA NATIVE WORKER 

Michigan— $35.55 

Christian Workers 

Woodland, 10 00 

Sunday-school 

Sugar Ridge, 25 55 

Ohio— $20.00 

Northwestern District, Christian Workers 

Pleasant View, 15 00 

Northeastern District, Congregation 

Chippewa, 5 00 

Virginia— $39.00 

First District, Sunday-school 

Young Men's Bible Class, Cloverdale S. 

S 39 00 

Maryland— $45.00 

Eastern District, Individuals 

Edw. C. Bixler and wife, 45 00 

Missouri— $26.73 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Wakenda 26 73 

Iowa— $47.31 

Middle Iowa, Sunday-school 

Dallas Center, 37 50 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Greene 9 81 

Kansas— $135.20 

Northeastern District, Individuals 

J. A. Waters, $7.60; F. E. Porster and 

wife, $7.60, 15 20 

Sunday-school 

Servants of the Master, Morrill, $15; 

Appanoose, $30, .._ 45 00 

Northwestern District 

< Gospel Workers 75 00 

Indiana— $133.75 

Northern District, Individuals 

Chas. Eaton and wife, 15 00 

Sunday- schools 

Winners' Class, North Winona S. S., 
$25; Six Sunday-schools in Northern In- 
diana, $75 100 00 

Middle District 

Markle Brethren Society, 18 75 

Total for the month $ 482 54 



Previously reported, 860 

Total to date, $ 1,343 

PING TING HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 
BUILDING 
Nebraska— $47.50 

Aid Societies 

Bethel, $25; Omaha, $5; Octavia, $15; Al- 

vo, $2.50, 47 

Mary land— $60 .00 
Aid Societies 

New Windsor, $20; Westminster, $40, .. 60 

Virginia— $73.00 
Aid Societies 

Timberville, $23; Linville Creek, $50, ... 73 

Pennsylvania— $30.00 
Middle District, Aid Society 

Lewistown, 30 

Florida— $12.50 
Aid Society 

Sebring, 12 

Kansas— $32.50 

Northeastern District, Aid Societies, 32 

Iowa — $25.00 

Southern District, Aid Societies, 25 

Virginia— $40.00 

Northern District, Aid Societies 

Dayton, $20; West Mill Creek, $20, 40 

Illinois— $113.40 

Northern Illinois and Wisconsin 

Aid Societies, 113 

Total for the month, $ 433 

Previously reported, 175 

Total to date, 609 

LIAO CHOU MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 
Nebraska— $10.04 

Sunday-school 

South Beatrice, 10 

Indiana— $20.00 

Southern District, Individuals 

Ida Brubaker, $10; Mary Brubaker, 
$10, 20 

Total for the month, $ 30 

Previously reported, 169 

Total to date, $ 199 

CHINA HOSPITAL 
Pennsylvania— $105.75 

Southeastern District, Aid Society 

Germantown, 100 

Individual 

Receipt No. 46506, 5 

Southern District, Individual 

Receipt No. 46715 

Illinois— $15.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Elgin, 15 

Iowa— $42.90 

Middle District, Christian Workers 

Dallas Center, 42 

Total for the month, $ 163 

Previously reported 494 

Total to date, $ 658 

PING TING HOSPITAL 
Oregon— $10.00 

Aid Society 
Mabel, 10 

Total for the month, $ 10 

Previously reported, 602. 

Total to date, $ 612 

CHINA ORPHANAGE 

West Virginia— $1.00 

Second District, Individual 

C. W. O'Brien, 1 

Washington — $25.00 
Congregation 

Yakima, 25 



70 



04 



00 



00 



March 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



95 



Indiana— $30.50 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Little Sunbeam Class, Anderson S. S., . . 8 50 

Northern District, Aid Society 

Walnut 22 00 

Pennsylvania— $50.00 

Middle District, Sunday-school 

Huntingdon 35 00 

Eastern District, Individual 

Receipt No. 46507 5 00 

Eastern District, Christian Workers 

Ephrata, 10 00 

Total for the month, $ 106 50 

Previously reported, 592 14 

Total to date, $ 698 64 

OKLAHOMA MEMORIAL BOARDING SCHOOL 

Oklahoma— $315.00 

Individuals 

Charity Holsinger, $25; F. E. Marchen, 
$25; W. H. Carrier, $40; C. D. Fager, $200, 290 00 
Christian Workers 

Big Creek, 25 00 

Total for the month, $ 315 00 

Previously reported, 80 00 

Total to date $ 395 00 

CHINA GIRLS' SCHOOL 
Montana— $2.60 
Congregation 

Grand View, 2 60 

Oregon— $1.00 
Congregation 

Portland, 1 00 

Illinois— $5.28 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Sister Christner's Class, 5 28 

Pennsylvania— $21 .00 
Eastern District, Individual 

Receipt No. 46505, 5 00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Junior Class, Ridge S. S 16 00 

Ohio— $15.00 

Northeastern District, Congregation 

Chippewa 5 00 

Southern District, Aid Society 

Lower Miami 10 00 

Total for the month, $ 44 88 

Previously reported, 388 64 

Total to date $ 433 52 

DENMARK MISSION 
Ohio— $5.00 

Northeastern District, Congregation 

Chippewa 5 00 

Montana — $1.00 
Congregation 

Grand View, 100 

Oregon — $0.41 

Congregation, Portland, 41 

Total for the month, $ 6 41 

Previously reported, 15 00 

Total to date, $ 2141 

SWEDEN MISSION 
Ohio— $5.00 

Northeastern District, Congregation 

Chippewa, 5 00 

Montana— $1.00 

Congregation, Grand View 100 

Oregon— $0.35 

Congregation, Portland, 35 

Kansas— $10.00 

Individual, Mrs. Alice Vaniman, 10 00 

Pennsylvania— $1.35 

Eastern District, Congregation 

Peach Blossom, 35 

Southern District, Individual 

Receipt No. 46714, 100 

Total for the month, $ 17 70 



Previously reported, 188 02 

Total to date $ 205 72 

MALMO CHURCHHOUSE 

Virginia — $26.51 

Eastern District, Congregation 
Fairfax, 26 51 

Total for the month, $ 26 51 

Previously reported 1,726 57 

Total to date, $ 1,753 08 

STUDENT FELLOWSHIP FUND 
Virginia— $165.00 

Eastern District 
Hebron Seminary 165 00 

Total for the month, $ 165 00 

Previously reported, 2,842 77 

Total to date, $ 3,007 77 

RELIEF AND RECONSTRUCTION 
COMMITTEE'S REPORT FOR 

JANUARY, 1920 
ARMENIAN AND SYRIAN RELIEF 

Arkansas 

Cora Fiant, Springdale, $4; Ola Fiant, 
Springdale, $4, $ 8 00 

California 

Augustus Bush, Lemoore, $10; Patterson 
Church, $25; Covina Cong., $73.54; Live Oak 
Cong., $13; Mrs. M. S. Frantz, Lindsay, $5, 126 54 

Colorado 

Rocky Ford Church, $126; Mrs. Therese 
Lohmiller, Pueblo, $3, 129 00 

Florida 

Sebring Church, 51 09 

Idaho 

Weiser Cong., $18.95; Nezperce Ch., $4.76, 23 71 

Illinois 

Young Ladies' Class, Okaw Cong., $10; 
Champaign Church, $7; C. W. Society, West 
Branch Church, $35; West Branch Church, 
>S6; Douglas Park Mission, Chicago, $22.63; 
Coal Creek Cong., $21; Mt. Morris Cong., 
$190; Batavia S. S., $5; Shannon S. S., $21; 
A Sister, Naperville, $2; Wm. Lampin, 
Polo, $10; Mrs. John J. Swartz, $10; A 
Soldier, Rockford, $3; Brother George Stef- 
an's Class, La Place S. S., $4; Mrs. W. S. 
Sanford, Ashton, $40; E. P. and Alice Tros- 

tle, Mt. Morris, $25, 49163 

Indiana 

First Church, South Bend, $116.44; Log- 
ansport Church, $22.70; Class No. 1, Log- 
ansport S. S., $2.75; Huntington City Ch., 
?7?.50; Turkey Creek S. S., $10; Howard S. 
S., $10.50; Maple Grove Cong., $8; Maple 
Grove S. S., $24.56; West Goshen Church, 
$59.25; Union Center Church, $54; Fairview 
S. S. and Church, $48; Two small S. S. 
Classes of Cedar Lake Cong., $10.26; Ladies' 
Aid Society, Four Mile Church, $50; Four 
Mile S. S., $50; Pyrmont S. S., $50; Pyr- 
mont Church, $14; Little Gleaners' S. S. 
Class, $2.50; Cedar Lake S. S., $10; White 
Church S. S., $33.44; South Union S. S., 
>18.64; Lower Deer Creek S. S., $12; New 
Bethel S. S., $3; Nettle Creek Cong., $17.60; 
White Gift Offering, Indianapolis S. S., 
$25.50; Leader Class, Walnut Church, $10; 
Elkhart Valley Cong., $90; Buck Grove S. 
S, $10; Mrs. M. O. Pierce, Noblesville, 
>2; James A. Byer and wife, Lapel, $3; 
John Whitmer, Nappanee, $2; Frank Nus- 
baura's S. S. Class, Middlebury, $8.85; Mrs. 
D. \Y. Ecker, Nappanee, $15; D. O. Cottrell, 
Xorth Manchester, $5.75; Cecil, Vera and 
Wava Fifer, Butler, $1.50; E. and R. Fash- 

baugh, Pierceton, $5, 884 74 

Iowa 

Nellie Myer's S. S. Class, Panther Creek 
S. S., $12; Mrs. L. H. Slifer, Grundy Center, 
$10; Plus Ultra Class, Waterloo, $10; E. C. 
Whitmer and wife, Curlew, $25; Panther 



96 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1920 



Creek S. S., $28.73; Panther Creek C. W. 
Society, $11.59; Volunteer Class, Waterloo 
S. S., $15; Cedar Rapids C. W. Society, 
$45.04; C. W. Society of Dry Creek Church, 
$11; Garrison S. S., $122.25; Mt. Etna Ch., 

$8.50, 299 11 

Kansas 

D. M. Negley, Hutchinson, $5; East Side 
Wichita Church, $20; West Side Wichita 
S. S., $2.64; M. A. Keck, Beattie, $105; Mrs. 
W. H. Sell, Fredonia, $5; A Sister, Waldo, 
$5; Burroak Church, $70; Larned Church, 
$114.35; Hutchinson S. S., $5; Maple Grove 
Church, $10; C. W. Society of Navarre 
Church, $76; Richland Center Cong., $95.33; 
Rock Creek Church, $44.75; John Bowman, 
Quinter, $15; Eden Valley S. S.J $21.61; 

Overbrook S. S., $9.42, 604 10 

Kentucky 

Owen Barnhart, Smile, 2 90 

Louisiana 

Roanoke Church 121 00 

Maryland 

A Brother and Sister, Pleasant View 
Cong., $200; Green Hill S. S., $10; Jno. E. 
Hartman and wife, Westover, $10; Middle- 
town Valley Cong., $40; Harvey Beard, 
Meadow Branch Cong., $40; A. Baker, 
Swanton, $5; Therese Schneider, Baltimore, 
$3; Brownsville S. S., $60; Fulton Ave., S. 
S., Baltimore, $113.62; Nannie A. Martin, 
Hagerstown, $5; John D. Roop, Westmin- 
ster, $20; Individuals, Meadow Branch 
Cong., $223.62; Westminster Offering, $65.75; 
Meadow Branch S. S., $50; Manor S. S., 

Middle District, $54.15, 900 14 

Michigan 

New Haven Church, $14; Woodland Ch., 
$294.50; Mrs. E. J. Reed, Constantine, $3.25; 
Mrs. F. Reed, Constantine, $8; Harlan Ch., 

$7.58; Shepherd S. S., $35, i 362 33 

Minnesota 

Root River Cong., $262.50; Worthington 
S. S., $82.74; E. C. Grossnickle, Buffalo 
Lake, $25; Hines Union S. S., $12; C. W. • 
Society, Worthington, $5; Mr. and Mrs. 

D. Broadwater, Preston, $5, 392 24 

Missouri 

South Warrensburg Church, $17.55; Mrs. 
J. C. Christopher, Warrensburg, $5; Emma 
L. Schildknecht, Rea, $4; Pleasant View 
Cong., $21.50, 48 05 

Montana n n 

Frank Kasten, Galpin Union S. S., 5 00 

Nebraska 

J. E. Young, Filley, $25; Sister C. R. 
Musselman, Kearney, $5; Bethel Cong., 
$350; Lincoln Church, $44; Carrie Kindig, 
Juniata, $5; Mary E. Kindig, Juniata, $10, 439 00 
New Mexico 

Miami S. S., $18.93; Clovis S. S., $12.15, .. 31 08 

New York 

Christian Endeavor Class, Brooklyn, 10 00 

South Carolina 

Dr. W. T. Head, Melvin Hill Church, $500; 
Mary A. Smawley, Mill Creek Church, $5, 505 00 
North Dakota 

Brumbaugh Church, $15; Egeland Church, 
$18.39; Zion S. S., $25, 58 39 

Ohio 

Hickory Grove Church, $29.37; Virginia 
*Bixler's Class, Hartville S. S., $106; A Sis- 
ter, Walbridge, $10; Cedar Grove C. W. 
Society, $16.52; Canton City S. S., $16; Pain- 
ter Creek S. S., $4.03; Ross Cong., N. W. 
Ohio, $17.50; Greenville Church, $179.39; 
Jordan S. S., Ft. Recovery, $5; Eagle Creek 
S. S., $103.73; Tippecanoe City Church, $25; 
C. Wohlgamuth, Burbank, $5; A. Miller, 
Bellefontaine, $5; E. E. Wenger, Wept Mil- 
ton, $15; Black Swamp Church, N. W. 
Ohio, $12; Mohican S. S., N. E. Ohio, $11.61; 
Baker S. S., $30; Pleasant View Cong, $25, 616 15 



Oklahoma 

Paradise Prairie Church, $13.74; Thomas 

S. S., $9.58, 23 32 

Oregon 

Bandon S. S., $9.40; C. W. Society, Wes- 
ton Church, $12; Newberg S. S., $15, 36 40 

Pennsylvania 

Altoona Church, $447.16; Willing Workers' 
Class, Pike S. S., $9.17; Brotherton, Pike 
S. S., $59.56; Gleaners' Class, Akron S. S., 
$15; James Creek S. S., $15.56; East Berlin 
S. S., $213.40; Huntsdale Cong., $84.10; 
Huntsdale S. S., $25.50; New Philadelphia 
Church, $60; Green Spring Church, $6.85; 
Carson Valley Cong., $5; Curry ville C. W. 
Society, $12; Beachdale S. S., Berlin Cong., 
$14.26; Bellwood Church, $49; Gettysburg S. 
S., $5; Maple Spring Church, Quemahoning 
Cong., $50; Johnstown Cong., $76; Dry Val- 
ley Church, $5; Elk Lick Church, $20; First 
Church Philadelphia S.' S., $134.14; Royers- 
ford S. S., $51.18; Free Spring S. S., Lost 
Creek Cong., $20; Wolgamood S. S., Lower 
Conewago Cong., $15; Smithfield Cong., 
$33.63; Mercersburg S. S., $6; Martinsburg 
S. S., Clover Creek Cong., $66.63; Waynes- 
boro Church, $144.86; Mrs. Emma Good, 
Lancaster, $5; Scalp Level Cong., $19; Cal- 
vary Mission, Philadelphia, $57; Coventry 
Church, $100; Mrs. Mary B. Dittmar, Car- 
lisle, 50c; A Brother and Sister, Martins- 
burg, $10; Jacob G. Aldinger, York, $50; 
A Sister, Elliottsville, $1; Receipt No. 4654, 
Carlisle, $2; A Sister, Carlisle, $1; R. T. 
Idleman and other individuals, Marianna, 
$12; Mrs. Mary M. Casney, Bunkertown, 
$10; Elmer Walker, Meyersdale, $7.50; J. 
R. Stayer, Curryville, $20; Miss Helen Hyl- 

tpn, Lancaster, $1, 1,940 00 

Tennessee 

A Methodist Sister, Jonesboro, $5; Mr. 

and Mrs. W. C. Gammon, Tate, $5 10 00 

Virginia 

E. C. Geiman, Crimora, $8.65; Mrs. Frank 
Stultz, Dovesville, $1; Mary F. Forrester, 
Fairfax, $5; Mrs. J. W. Harshberger, 
Waynesboro, $5; John Snodgrass, Trout- 
ville, $7.56; Blackwater S. S., $47; Mt. Her- 
mon S. S.. $11; Cook's Creek Cong., $30.51; 
Dayton Aid Society, $21; Mill Creek Cong., 
$157.52; Antioch Cong., $75.50; Bridgewater 
S. S., $321.84; Cedar Bluff Church, $106.13; 
Barren Ridge Cong., $12; Cloverdale S. S., 

$265; Daleville Cong., $68 1,142 71 

Washington 

Wenatchee Volunteer Mission Band, $108; 
Wenatchee City S. S., $116.90; Mrs. Arthur 
A. Myers, Outlook, $5; C. L.' Ledbetter, 
Easton, $15; Sisters' Aid Society, Centralia, 
$8; Centralia S. S., $11.17; Olympia Ch., $36, 300 07 
West Virginia 

S. M. Annon, Thornton, $1; Jason Har- 

man, Eglon, $20, 2100 

Wisconsin 

Oak Park S. S., $15; J. M. Fruit, Viola, 
$50, 65 00 

Total for month of January, $ 9,647 70 

FRENCH ORPHANS' RELIEF FUND 
Ohio 

Zion's W. B. Church, $ 7 61 

Pennsylvania 

Cradle Roll, Elk Lick Cong., 5 00 

Total for month of January, $ 12 61 

SERBIAN RELIEF FUND 
California 

Reedley Cong., $ 31 10 

Total for month of January $ 31 10 

JEWISH RELIEF FUND 

Pennsylvania 

Christian Workers' Society, Ridgeley,..$ 17 27 

Total for month of January, $ 17 27 




To take a trip through our China Mission Fields — by securing 

China— A Challenge to the Church 

Edited by Isaiah E. Oberholtzer, Norman A. Seese, Walter J. Heisey 

Latest and most complete information from our China Mission 

Full of facts and pictures which the church — the base of supply 
for funds — will want to know and see. 115 pages covering 14 distinct 
phases of the work. Sent postpaid, 50c. 

Also make a similar trip through Our India Mission by reading 

A Year with Our Missionaries 

in India 

The Annual India Report concealed in Story Form 

Written by W. B. Stover, Pioneer Missionary to India 

William Weston and his good wife Mary take a trip from Penn- 
sylvania to visit the India Mission. What they see at the different 
stations causes them to marvel at the progress of the work and in- 
cidentally they give us the facts for the year's work. The story car- 
ries the interest throughout. Sent postpaid, 15c. 

COMBINATION OFFER NO. I 



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A Year With Our Missionaries in India, 15 { 

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Total, $1.15 

These four items will be sent postpaid upon receipt of $1.00 j 

Address these orders to 
GENERAL MISSION BOARD, Elgin, III. ! 



^' lM;!l|:;h, l,,'i,:"i, M,', '■'!,.',.:;,■ 'i; : 'l,,'l,, :'ll: '',, ■,.,:!,,,; , m :;, '!; I,'!,!,,'! | |||||||||1|||||||||| ||||||I|||||i||||| H |!||| |||||||||| r.f, |G 


1 Get Away Trouble | 

| A Personal Message to Our Readers: ( 


These are days of High Prices in everything, and, although 


everyone hopes that they will come down, there seems little evi- 


dence of it. While prices are high, wages are good, farm products § 


are a favorable price, and land is higher than ever known before. 


Many of our readers are marketing splendid flocks, and much grain. § 


1 Many have accumulated large bank accounts through the prosper- 1 


1 ity of the last few years ; a good many of you are selling farms. 1 


I Now Where Shall I 


Your Money Be Invested ? 


1 This Is the Question | 


;|| Why not exchange your Bank Accounts and your Farms for the J 


H Annuity Bonds of the General Mission Board? = 


p Consider Well the Following Eight Points About Our Bonds: 


n 








n 


1 


They are Absolutely safe. Our as- 






With these bonds you can provide a 


1 


s= 


sets put us in the Trust Company 






permanent income for dependent rela- 


=3 


g 


Class. 






tives. Many times money left for 


= 


e 








these is squandered or falls prey to 


= 


= 


They are easily secured. The 






the unscrupulous. 


= 


= 


method is simple. We do the work 








= 


= 


and no lawyer is required. 






The money is safe because it is in- 


= 


= 








vested in first mortgages on farm 


= 


m 


You have neither worry, trouble nor 






lands. 


n 


= 


concern. Your income is fixed and you 






You become your own executor. No 


= 


= 


can tell for years ahead just how 






share of your estate goes to lawyers 


= 


== 


much you will get and the day it will 






or those who have not helped you to 


^ 


= 


come. 






earn it. 


= 


= 








Your money goes to the work of the 


= 


= 


The interest rate is as large as can 






Lord after it has served you faithfully 


= 


= 


be expected, commensurate with the 






and well. It helps to extend His King- 


~ 


== 


earning power of money. 






dom to the ends of the earth. 


1 


Every dollar of our assets is back of these annuity bonds. Why 


worry further? Write us for full information 


GENERAL MISSION BOARD OF THE CHURCH OF THE 


| BRETHREN, Elgin, Illinois § 


illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii minimi I H in miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i 



THE MISSIONARY 




Church-^ the 'Brethren 



Vol. XXII 



APRIL, 1920 



No. 4 




mmmwm 

Sweitzer Memorial Girls' School, Liao Chou, Shansi, China 

g>tnb?nt l&olnntnr Number 



The Missionary Visitor 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN 
THROUGH HER GENERAL MISSION BOARD 



Subscription Terms 



THE SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IS FIFTY CENTS PER YEAR 

The subscription price is included in EACH donation of a dollar or more to the Gen- 
eral Mission Board, either direct or through any congregational collection, provided the 
dollar or more is given by one individual and in no way combined with another's gift. 
Different members of the same family may each give a dollar or more, and extra sub- 
scriptions, thus secured, may upon request be sent to persons who they know will be in- 
terested in reading the Visitor. 

Kindly notice, however, that these subscription terms do not include a subscription for 
every dollar donation, but a subscription for each donation of one dollar or more, no matter 
how large the donation. 

Ministers. In consideration of their, .services to the church, influence in assisting the 
Committee to raise missionary money, arid Upon their request annually, the Visitor will 
be sent to ministers of the Church of the Brethren. 

Foreign postage, IS cents additional to all foreign countries, including Canada. Sub- 
scriptions discontinued at expiration of time. 

To insure delivery of paper, prompt notice of change of address should be given. When 
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Address all communications regarding subscriptions and make remittances payable to 

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Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, Act of 
October 3, 1917, authorized Aug. 20, 1918. 



Contents for April, 1920 



EDITORIALS, . ... 99 



ESSAYS— 



One Million Dollars for Our Conference Offering, 98 

The Bleating of Other Sheep (Poem), By R. G. West, 102 

History, Accomplishment and Aim of the United Student Volunteer 

Movement, By A. D. Helser, 103 

The Spiritual Import of the Forward Movement, By the Editor 106 

The Place of Prayer in the Life of the Foreign Volunteer, By Nor- 
man A. Wilson, 109 

Echoes from the Blue Ridge Volunteer Band, By Edna A. Dotterer, 111 
Missionary Education in Our Colleges and Churches, By Ezra 

Wenger, ( 112 

Medical Missions and Missionaries, By Elliott B. Thomas 114 

Why I Am Going to Africa, By C. 6. Miller 116 

Mountain Missions of the South, By Lewis Naylor, 118 

Why Attend the Annual Conference at Sedalia? By Miles Blickenstaff, 120 
What Constitutes a Call to the Foreign Field? By Densie Hollinger, 121 
India Notes, By Anetta C. Mow 122 



FINANCIAL REPORT, 



123 



Volume XXII APRIL, 1920 No. 4 



A MESSAGE TO THOSE WHO LABOR 

This month we are engaged in a great task. It is the opening scene 
of what we believe will be the greatest movement in the Church^ of the 
Brethren. You are to be congratulated that you have a part in it. An 
old brother recently said that this was a Movement in which he wanted 
to have his full share. A young man recently said when he learned of this 
Movement, " That just grips us fellows." 

There are a few things that we sincerely trust you will bear in mind 
in undertaking this great task, this superhuman effort: 

With God all things are possible; without him all things fail. 

Your efforts must be seasoned and ripened with much prayer. 

We must pray for the proper guidance and direction in our every 
effort. 

Fervent prayers are more effectual than fervid oratory. 

Encourage your people to pray individually over their share in this 
offering. 

Temper your enthusiasm with the sanest type of judgment of which 
you are capable. 

Make your statements about the Forward Movement and the ingath- 
ering safe, sane, and plausible. 

Keep Christ and the church foremost in your appeals. 

Give Christ the rightful first place. 

Dignify his cause as reflected through our church, in your appeals. 

This Movement is for a Greater Church of the Brethren for the 
World. 

You are the most important person in the whole Forward Movement 
propaganda. With you success lies; with you failure may rest. The 
whole organization has been perfected with dependence upon you. In you 
the leaders have implicit confidence. You cannot fail in this supreme 
moment. 

A minister said of his Forward Movement not long ago: " We are 
sailing out upon an uncharted sea; but it is better to sail than to wreck at 
the dock." It is better to sail than to wreck, but our sea is charted and 
lesus Christ is the Leader. Let us labor together; let us solve our prob- 
lems, our differences, and let us create new bonds of sympathy, new tics 
of love, new affections, new appreciations for the church and for Christ, 
through the power of the Forward Movement. Let us make it our own 
Movement, not " theirs"; let us attempt great things for it; let us expect 
great things from it; and let us allow God to lead us out into completest 
service. 

All things are possible to him that believeth. 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1920 



One Million Dollars for 

Dear Brethren and Sisters of the Church 
of the Brethren: 
We are coming to you at this time with 
an appeal such as has never been made in 
the Church of the Brethren— TO RAISE 
ONE MILLION DOLLARS AS A CON- 
FERENCE OFFERING. 

The sum asked for and included in the 
Million Dollars is to be divided as follows: 

General Missions $ 390,000.00 

Home Missions, 200,000.00 

Aged and Disabled Ministers 

and Missionaries, 40,000.00 

Religious Education (Sunday- 
School Board), 30,000.00 

Young People's Work (Chris- 
tian Workers' Board), 10,000.00 

Christian Education (Educa- 
tional Board and Schools), .. 330,000.00 

$1,000,000.00 

Our colleges are more and more being 
depended upon for our church leaders; the 
type, the quality, the spiritual fervor of our 
church leaders must be tempered and de- 
veloped first about our firesides, where 
stewardship is taught and practiced; and 
then to be prepared for life under the en- 
vironment and with splendid equipment in 
our own colleges. 

Our missions at home and abroad are 
faced with increased supports for workers 
and with increased cost of everything that 
is eaten, worn or used in missionary propa- 
ganda. 

Our Sunday School Board feels the bur- 
den of responsibility for giving trend to 
the lives of our wonderful children, who 
we are determined shall never be lost to 
the church. 

Our Christian Workers' Board desires 
to spend itself in study and plans for the 
saving of our young people and rescuing 
others for the kingdom of Jesus Christ. 

Our aged ministers are not being prop- 
erly provided for in many instances. We 
have asked them to preach for nothing and 
they have done it; like the old faithful 
horse we would turn them out upon the 
commons and too often are doing it. Thus 
the need for funds for this just debt. 

We have come to the place in our church 



Our Conference Offering 

history where we are able to do something 
magnificent for the Lord, something of 
which the church is capable, and something 
which will challenge the attention and co- 
operation of every man, woman and child 
in the church. 

We are in the post-war days. Thousands 
— yes, hundreds of thousands — of dollars 
have been freely given by our people with- 
in the last few years for the alleviation of 
suffering, the winning of the war, and the 
cause of oppressed and persecuted peoples. 
The war physically has been won; but we 
wrestle not against flesh and blood in these 
days, but against the spiritual powers of 
darkness. Another such victory as has 
been won and the world would be in finan- 
cial bankruptcy. We are brought face to 
face with the after-effects of a great con- 
flict, and have had placed upon us as a na- 
tion the greatest spiritual burdens that 
have ever fallen upon the shoulders of any 
people. And our church, as champions of 
the cause of Jesus Christ, is among those 
for whom Christ died and from whom he 
is expecting great things. If we fail to rise 
in this supreme emergency and discharge 
our debt of gratitude to Almighty God, 
may he have mercy upon our own souls 
and the future of our church. 

The Church of the Brethren has a splen- 
did past; she has a more glorious future. 
The Father, who has led us and protected 
us, who has inspired our fathers in what 
they have done in deep piety and devotion, 
has not done this for naught; verily he has 
led us unto this hour; and he expects every 
member of the Church of the Brethren — 
the writer of this message, every member 
of every board, General, District, or local, 
every elder, pastor, minister, or local 
church officer, every layman, farmer, office 
man, shopkeeper, every person whosoever 
and wheresoever — to do his full duty in 
this great offering which is to be lifted. 

These are days of big things, the great- 
est armies, and navies, and riches, and in- 
comes, and salaries, and expenditures for 
selfish purposes, and wasteful extrava- 
gance, that the world has ever seen. Would 
it not be shameful to the cause of Christ, 
humiliating to the dignity of our faith, and 



April 

1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



99 



impoverishing to the enrichment of the 
lives of ourselves and our children if we 
failed in this crisis? 

We can raise this great offering if we 
will work together at the task, for it is 
being apportioned among all of our people. 
We have learned that folks like to know 
how much their portion is in any great 
financial campaign, the same as a farmer 
likes to know how many teams his neigh- 
bor wants of him to help him thresh. We 
are learning the power of team work. And 
we shall learn through this offering that 
in united giving a great sum can be raised. 

We hope that each of you will be think- 
ing in terms of great sums as your own 
donations. There must be many thousand- 
dollar donations; there will doubtless be 
some five-thousand-dollar offerings. Some 
will think in terms of farms. You will be 
permitted to designate to what cause you 
wish your funds to go. But it is hoped 
that you will simply let the amount go to- 
wards the great budget. 

The time set is from April 25 to May 2. 



The period will thus cover only one week. 
This is YOUR CONFERENCE OFFER- 
ING. You may not be able to pay all that 
you desire to pledge. Your pledge can be 
paid any time between now and Feb. 28, 
1921. The pledges will be retained in your 
local church, where you can easily make 
your payments; the offering itself can be 
sent to the Forward Movement, Elgin, 111., 
where it will be receipted promptly. 

Make this great ingathering a subject for 
earnest prayer. Pray for the leaders, for 
the success of the Movement, and diligently 
inquire of the Lord what share he desires 
you to have in the offering. Then give as 
he may prosper you. 

May the Father bless you richly in your 
every task and effort for him. 

Most fraternally yours, 
General Christian Workers' Board, 
General Sunday School Board, 
General Educational Board, 
General Mission Board, 

Church of the Brethren. 



EDITORIALS 



We are indeed glad to present this 
copy of the Visitor to our readers, for it 
is a special volunteer issue, and to the 
volunteers do we owe credit for the 
greater number of the articles herein 
printed. The success of big enterprises 
in our church is so closely related to the 
volunteers that we are glad for these 
messages from them. We regret that 
some bands were unable to secure the 
picture of their foreign volunteers in 
time for this issue. Lack of space pre- 
vents printing a story contributed by 
Bridgewater, but it will be printed in a 
later number. < ^ 

" Finally, be strong in the Lord, and in 
the strength of his might. Put on the 
whole armor of Goq\ that ye may be able 
to stand against the wiles of the devil. For 
our wrestling is not against flesh and blood, 
but against the principalities, against the 
powers, against the world-rulers of this 
darkness, against the spiritual hosts of 
wickedness in the heavenly places. Where- 
fore take up the whole armor of God, that 



ye may be able to withstand in the evil 
day, and, having done all, to stand." 



In these days of doubts, of unbelief, of 
faithlessness and coldness towards God, it 
is comforting to hear the command to stand 
strong in the Lord and in the strength of 
his might. Not alone does this command 
ring out clear, but there is implied within 
it the thought that we can stand strong in 
him, that he is sufficient in spite of any 
opposition that may arise. The writer does 
not leave us long in the dark either as to 
what this abstract " stand " may be,' for 
he proceeds at once to outline to us the 
details of that heavenly armor which has 
always been found sufficient against even 
the severest trials and persecutions and 
doubts that have assailed the Christian 
church. 



"And, having done all, to stand." There 
is no implication in these words that we 
are to do anything less than we ourselves 
have strength to do. We are to do all; but 
from our limit in strength and abilities 



100 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1920 



there reaches out a great expanse to cover 
before we reach the ultimate victory. Jesus 
Christ alone is sufficient for this great 
" lapse " in our vision, this great insuffi- 
ciency of ourselves through ourselves. And 
he can and will supply the ability and forti- 
tude to stand, to accomplish, to win vic- 
tory under the most trying circumstances. 

Not long ago we heard of a dear member 
of the church, a splendid, pious individual 
whom we love dearly, who said, " Oh, why 
could not the church get along without a 
Forward Movement? Why could we not 
go along just as we have been doing? " 
" New occasions teach new duties," replies 
the poet, and prophetic were his words as 
concerns the present time. The great oc- 
casion of the present moment renders his 
words true. It was not a question of re- 
maining as we have been, and prospering 
as God would have us; rather, it was a 
question of remaining as we have been and 
failing to discharge our duty in the sight 
of Almighty God. 



Do you often wonder how you can find 
the will of God? Listen to the first prin- 
ciple to this end, as laid down by that giant 
of faith, George Miiller, of England: "An 
Obedient Heart. I seek at the beginning 
to get my heart into such a state that it 
has no will of its own in regard to a given 
matter. Nine-tenths of the difficulties are 
overcome when our hearts are ready to do 
the Lord's will, whatever it may be. When 
one is truly in this state, it is usually but a 



little way to the knowledge of what his 
will is." 3^> 

We must take off our hats to the Student 
Volunteers as they go marching by. First 
in spiritual war, first in consecration and 
surrender, and now first in gifts for the 
One Million Dollar offering. As a result 
of the Student Fellowship Drive during 
February and March for the benefit of 
equipment for the Ping Ting Hsien Hos- 
pital, the following offerings have thus far 
been reported from the schools: 

Bethany Bible School, $4,192.00 

Mt. Morris College 1,650.00 

Elizabethtown College 1,350.00 

La Verne College, 1,211.00 

Manchester College, 2,100.00 

Inasmuch as the original goal was $8,500, 
it will be seen what the college students 
are doing as the vanguard of the great 
spring campaign. -<-^ 

About Our Missionary Family 

We regret to announce that Bro. J. 
Homer Bright has been very seriously ill 
of typhus fever, but are glad to know that 
he is slowly recovering. He was taken sick 
while in Peking, and has been in a hospital 
in that place. 

Brethren Wampler and Horning, with 
their families, reached China in the last 
days of January, after a very splendid voy- 
age, excepting a bit of excitement and sus- 
pense when an inexperience^ Japanese pi- 
lot drove their ship on the rocks at Naga- 
saki. No one was injured and they were 
taken off in safety. 

Word from our India parties of January 




Foreign Volunteers— Bethany 



April 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



101 



10 and 17 has been received, the same hav- 
ing been written from Japan. A splendid 
voyage across the Pacific was enjoyed by 
each of the parties, and doubtless they will 
all be in India before these lines greet our 
readers. 

After repeated efforts Bro. W. E. Glas- 
mire's have finally been able to find a resi- 
dence. They are at home to any friends 
who may call or wish to write to them, 
being located at the following address: 
Villa Pax, Koldby, Pr. Hordum, Denmark. 



In order to see the future we need only 
to know what is being taught our children. 
A speaker at the Indianapolis Pastors' Con- 
ference showed how the influence of the 
book entiled "Uncle Tom's Cabin" did not 
exert very much national influence until the 
children who read it grew up and became 
the deciding factor in the nation. 

All through the churches this significant 
statement is being made: "The family altar 
is the greatest school of religion in the 
world." The family altar is also evangelis- 
tic. Many children and parents have ac- 
cepted Christ and his program as a direct 
result of the family worship. 



The family altar is also the greatest re- 
cruiting station for special Christian serv- 
ice in the world. A large percentage of 
ministers and missionaries decided their 
life work before they were eighteen years 
of age. Therefore, it is essential that the 
home furnish the proper religious training. 



The Sunday-school has the boy or girl only 
about twenty-six hours during the year and 
does not have the opportunity of daily con- 
tact. -<-^ 

We regret that through inability to se- 
cure sailings a good number of our mis- 
sionaries, returning both from India and 
China, on furlough, will be unable to reach 
America in time for Conference. Among 
those who will reach the States this year 
will be Bro. Wilbur Stover and family, 
J. M. Pittenger and family, I>rs. A. Ray- 
mond and Laura M. Cottre-11 and Sister B. 
Mary Royer, from India; Dr. O. G. Bru- 
baker and family, and Sister Emma Horn- 
ing from China, and Sister Ida Bucking- 
ham from Sweden. 

There are in the United States about 25,- 
000,000 young people under twenty-five 
years of age who are completely out of 
touch with any form of religious training. 
Most of them are regular attendants at the 
moving picture theaters and other places 
that have a tendency to draw men and 
women from the true way. What will it 
mean when these 25,000,000 come to the 
age when they shall become a deciding fac- 
tor in national affairs? 



Missionary work begins at home. Every 
congregation has a mission territory. 



One alarming condition exists in regard 
to the going out of missionaries in re- 
sponse to the call of our Master's com- 
mand, " Go ye." Not long ago in a corn- 




Foreign Volunteers— Bethany 



102 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1920 



pany of ninety volunteers it was discovered 
that only three had the joyous consent of 
their parents. < (((<g 

So many people can speak fluently of 
sacrifice and good works, but when it 
touches their own children or pocketbooks 
the ideal is lost. It ought to be a pleasure 
to give our children, if they desire to go to 
the foreign field. ^ ^ 

There are still many large congregations 
that do not support pastors, and still they 
do not give proportionately as much as 
some smaller congregations that do sup- 
port a pastor. It seems that such a con- 
gregation with a free ministry ought to be 
able to support four or five missionaries 
on the field. Think it over. You are re- 
sponsible for your possessions. 

A statement, based upon facts, says that 
a very large percentage of the country 
churches are not growing nor dying. If 
this is true of our rural church, isn't it 
time that we make an examination of our- 
selves? If a church is not growing in num- 
ber, because every one is a Christian in the 
community, it can grow in spirituality and 
in giving. »))) > 

What is a mission field? It is wherever 
there is an unsaved soul. It might be your 
own neighbor. " Go ye." 



The best way to keep young people ac- 
tive in a good cause is to keep giving them 
responsible tasks to do and to leave it to 
them and God to carry the work through. 



Many young people get very anxious to do 
something good and great, and if they are 
not given the privilege the spirit is lost. 
Save our young people by keeping them 
busy. ^ ^ 

The church in the homeland must grow 
or the work on the foreign field must reach 
its limit. With every man to the wheel on 
a united program the church will pass the 
100,000 mark in membership and give far 
more than we are asked in money. 



It is a significant fact that' the denomina- 
tion that gave the largest amount per cap- 
ita has doubled its membership since 1904. 

THE BLEATING OF OTHER SHEEP 

R. G. West 
The storms of life are raging wild, 

The floods are foaming high, 
And out among the storm-tossed hills 

I hear a mournful cry. 

The favored few are gathered safe 

Within the fold of God, 
But there are those who've never found 

The path their Savior trod. 

All other folds are breaking fast 

Beneath the tests of life, 
And many a soul is drifting past 

To fiercer storms of strife. 

" I've other sheep," my Savior says, 

" Who are not of this fold "— 
In vain they struggle in the dark 

Where breaking billows roll. 

Then how can I sit idle here 

And see my Savior weep? 
The storm is on, I'll heed the call — 

The bleating of other sheep. 

Bridgewater College. 




Foreign Volunteers — Bethany 



April 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



103 



History, Accomplishment and Aim of the United 
Student Volunteer Movement 



A. D. Helser 



THE movement was conceived 
through quiet, strenuous hours with 
God in prayer. Our Father has the 
record of these fundamental steps in our 
early history. He has rewarded and shall 
richly reward. Consecrated students of 
God early got a vision of the needs of the 
world. At first they were regarded as fa- 
natical, but God, who knew the heart, ten- 
derly guarded their efforts and brought 
them to fruition. Devoted faculty men and 
women made possible and in many cases 
started the movement in the school by 
gathering a number for special study and 
prayer. 

We must outline briefly each school's 
part in order to show the development of 
this movement which is destined to save 
the church. 

To Prof. M. W. Emmert is due the im- 
mediate starting of the Volunteer Band in 
Mt. Morris College. Of course, before this 
the impact of Wilbur Stover and others had 
been developing sentiment. Bro. Emmert 
called a few consecrated students into his 
home and there studied and prayed for the 
revelation of God's will. I find record of 
A. W. Ross as president and Nora Arnold 
as secretary of Mt. Morris College Mis- 
sionary Society, in 1902. This same year 
D. J. Lichty left for India. In 1903 the or- 
ganization was: Eva Trostle, president; 



G. W. Kieffaber, vice-president; Eva 
Lichty, secretary; and W. H. Royer, treas- 
urer. Deputation work was planned and 
given a strong start. 

The first record of band work in Mc- 
Pherson is Sept. 27, 1897. The first presi- 
dent was Mrs. Saylor. Other presidents 
following were Emma Horner Eby, E. H. 
Eby, and F. H. Crumpacker. In 1902 there 
were twenty-seven in the band. The same 
year 100 adopted systematic giving. Ten 
mission study classes in 1906 made a pro- 
found change in student life. Service to 
the surrounding churches began early. A 
prayer circle was the seed from which the 
band grew. 

In 1902 prayers in Manchester started a 
Missionary Reading Circle for study and 
prayer. The same year their prayers led 
them to start a mission Sunday-school in 
the west part of town. Geo. S. Strausbaugh 
and Edith Brubaker had immediate charge 
of this work. Home visiting also started 
about the same time. Missionary work 
went forward with leaps and bounds, with 
J. H. Morris and William Ulrich at the 
helm. 

La Verne started with a College Chris- 
tian League in 1906. Men and women gath- 
ered in separate groups for prayer. Mis- 
sion study groups soon developed. Later 
C. H. Yoder became president, and with 




Foreign Volunteers — Bethany 



104 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1920 



the help of I. V. Funderburgh and other 
faithful students and teachers put across 
an effective working organization. 

In 1899 the Holy Spirit brought a num- 
ber of the students in Juniata together for 
a meeting with the Lord. They felt the 
tug of his great heart of- love. Then they 
drew up the following pledge: "It is my 
purpose, if God permit, to be a missionary; 
as to whether it be in the home or foreign 
field, I await the further leading of the 
Spirit." Among the first to sign this were 
J. M. Blough, Jesse Emmert, Ida Himmels- 
baugh, J. M. Pittenger and others. The 
whole school was permeated by this great 
moving spirit. D. W. Kurtz and other 
leaders followed. Large mission study pro- 
grams challenged all who would open their 
eyes. 

Hebron opened her Volunteer work in 
1915. The first organization was: Densie 
Hollinger, president; Wilbie Hinegardner, 
vice-president; Esther Beahm, secretary. 
Deputation work has been very effective 
among the adjoining churches. A colored 
Sunday-school has been started by the 
students. Benjamin Summers proved . a 
large asset to the band. Many young stu- 
dents are receiving inspiration here that 
will carry them to the field. 

J. F. Graybill, W. E. Glasmire, Mar- 
garet Haas and Luella Fogelsanger were 
among the first to organize the Missionary 
Reading Circle at Elizabethtown. This 
was organized in 1906. Kathryn C. Ziegler 
was an early promoter of the movement. 
Lydia Stauffer, through earnest prayer and 



untiring effort, succeeded in putting the 
organization across. Sarah Beahm, Harry 
Moyer and Sarah Moyer were among the 
first volunteers. A Sunday-school has been 
started and deputation work is pointing 
the churches to their task. 

We find Daleville had a live band in 
1905. Personal evangelism was the first 
activity of the band. A number of the 
students were won to Christ. Jessie O. 
Harter and D. P. Hylton were among the 
early leaders. In 1906 there were ten vol- 
unteers. Daleville is well represented on 
the field. 

Canton College had eight live volunteers 
in 1906. They entered heartily into the 
deeper life, studied mission problems and 
sent a delegate to Nashville National Con- 
ference. (I have been unable to find who 
this was.) The brief life of this institution 
is nevertheless making its impression on 
the mission field. 

Bridgewater was among the first to catch 
the vision of world service. In 1912 they 
were planning to support a worker on the 
field. S. N. McCann was a pioneer there, 
W. K. Conner also came as one of the 
leaders. In 1904 we find the band work 
booming. Many responded to the voice 
from Macedonia. Classes for mission study 
found great interest in looking through the 
eyes of God into the needy world. F. J. 
Wampler came along next and instilled the 
spirit of martyrdom. Others followed, 
leading men and women into God's will. 

The spirit of Bethany was essentially 
missionary. Foreign missions were not 




m®m*m>jm 



Foreign Volunteers — Bethany 



April 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



105 



given a prominent place until 1909, when 
Minerva Metzger came from Indiana Uni- 
versity, where she had been fired with 
missionary zeal. She worked and prayed 
with the help of Samuel Bowman, Nettie 
Sanger and Ora Shively. Mission study 
was born of this prayer. Anna Blough 
became a leader in this. The band has 
grown with leaps and bounds. Personal 
evangelism coupled with the needs of the 
field leads many on. 

1901 found missionary sentiment growing 
in Maryland Collegiate Institute, now Blue 
Ridge. I. S. Long and D. Owen Cottrell 
were among the early leaders. Prof. Early, 
Mr. Harvey and Lula Sanger led out in di- 
recting activity and organizing mission 
study. The foundation of prayer has been 
supporting a growing band. The churches 
are appreciating the message the students 
are bringing them. 

The first record of a general movement 
among the schools is in 1900. We have the 
constitution of the Intercollegiate Volun- 
teer Association of the German Baptist 
Church, but have not been able to find its 
author. We hope to give a full statement 
of this development in booklet form soon. 
In 1918 the movement began to be recog- 
nized, and has found a ready response 
since. Elgin Moyer was one of its pro- 
moters. Schools gained large inspiration 
for missionary growth from mission study 
and large missionary conferences. 

I have the conviction that the present 
Interchurch World Movement is the great- 
est since the days of the Lord. The aim of 
the movement is adequately to occupy the 



sin-cursed, bleeding world for our crucified 
Lord in this generation. We must accom- 
plish the seemingly impossible through the 
power at hand to those who have martyr 
stuff in them. As individuals in this great 
movement we are not planning to suffer 
less than our great Captain has suffered. 

This brief letter is just the start. We 
owe to our schools, our movement and 
those who follow a clear, detailed state- 
ment of the growth of the bands in each 
school. No one has these details better 
than the students and teachers who fos- 
tered each band. I appeal to the teachers, 
former students and missionaries for the 
information from your school. I am sure 
you want your school to have proper rec- 
ognition. Please send this information to 
me promptly. Do not expect George to do 
it. Just as soon as this material is in it 
will be arranged and your contribution 
will be given due recognition in the book- 
let. No doubt some statistical mistakes 
have been made in this letter. Please cor- 
rect same. Do not be afraid to tell what 
part you had, for I will not sign your name 
to what you say about your work. I am 
also expecting detailed information of the 
general movement from those who have it. 
Your facts will draw other young lives on. 
Facts are the fingers of God tenderly tug- 
ging at the human heart. 

3435 Van Buren St., Chicago. 

The Chinese carried on the week of pray- 
er, largely by their own efforts at Ping 
Ting. There was an average attendance of 
about twenty-five. 



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Foreign Volunteers— Bethany 



106 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1920 



The Spiritual Import of the Forward Movement 



The Editor 



IT is all a campaign to raise money," 
says an honest individual, and what 
may be written to gainsay the state- 
ment? We must admit that the Church of 
the Brethren is beginning its Forward 
Movement, reorganized and reconstituted, 
with the greatest campaign for funds that 
the church has ever seen; but it must be 
admitted, also, that it would have been an 
impossibility to plan a great spiritual re- 
vival without the first step being an awak- 
ening along the lines of stewardship. We 
show the most interest in that project in 
which we have made our great investments. 
No king goeth to war without first com- 
puting the cost. No -church can plan for 
a spiritual war without first providing its 
sinews. 

The Forward Movement means more 
than simply a financial campaign. In fact, 
this is the smallest end of the work. If the 
raising of this great budget does not loosen 
a train of blessings upon the church, of 
which we do not dream, it will be a failure. 

We should face the facts of the church 
as they are, in stewardship, in fireside re- 
ligion, in evangelism, in adequate ministe- 
rial provision, in caring for our isolated 
memberships, in saving our young people 
to the church, and in shepherding those 
declining churches, of which we have a 
great number — yes, and in rekindling the 
fire of gospel truth in the hearts of those 
of our own number who have become cal- 



loused through the lure of commercialism. 
We should think of the countless thousands 
of young men — the citizens, the lawmakers, 
the fathers of tomorrow — who have come 
back from the front and who need the hand 
of warmth and sympathy, that they may 
forget the scenes and passions of war. 

Where are the fathers who are teaching 
stewardship in the church? Many, thank 
God, are doing it. But of the large num- 
ber of our ministers, with able-bodied sons, 
of our splendid body of deacon brethren, 
how large a percentage are teaching their 
children to dedicate their lives to the min- 
istry or mission field? We know of fa- 
thers, among our best, who are encourag- 
ing even their sons in the ministry to en- 
gage in secular work; we know of other 
ministers, too, who would never think of 
encouraging their sons to take up the min- 
istry. They want them to be comfortable 
business men. Some superhuman effort 
must be put forth to reach these fathers 
and their sons, or at least to guard against 
a repetition of such a generation of fathers 
and sons on the morrow. To this task the 
Forward Movement, through its teaching 
on stewardship, both for the moment and 
for the years to come, is definitely com- 
mitted. 

As for the fireside religion of our fathers, 
we must admit that the fires have burned 
low and the altars are being desecrated 
through unholy use and a commercialized 



**-0mjmm*Ji 




Foreign Volunteers— Bethany 



April 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



107 



life. The Bible is not being read as it once 
was — all honor to our fathers — and as it 
should be for honor to our sons. Nor can 
anything restore these fireside altars ex- 
cepting a renewed sense of stewardship of 
life and time. " I have much to do today, 
therefore I must pray three hours instead 
of two," said a godly man of some genera- 
tions ago; but we are teaching a religion 
of hasty prayers and practicing a paganism 
of omission even of these. But the church, 
with all of her efforts, has not stayed the 
ravages of this indifference. Only a super- 
human activity, a call to prayer, a leading 
back to God can restore these pillars of 
strength to the church of our fathers. To 
this task the Forward Movement is defi- 
nitely committed. 

Likewise with the evasion of our sense 
of stewardship, and with the decay of the 
family altar, we have let the fire of evan- 
gelism burn so low in many of our lives 
that we pray or plead for but few sinners; 
while in the lives of many the fire has gone 
out so completely that we never ask and 
have never asked one soul to accept Jesus 
Christ, not during the whole time of our 
Christian life. Nay, some have even risen 
among us whose hearts are so cold that 
they do not want certain ones to come into 
the church for fear they will cause their ease 
in Zion to be disturbed. The Forward Move- 
ment is definitely committed to the cause of 
evangelism, and the prayer is that this great 
offering will awaken us to a renewed zeal 
for the saving of souls. For in spite of the 
fact that we have enough ministers, were 
they at the task, to shepherd twice or three 



times our membership, we are unable with 
our machinery, our equipment, our Sunday- 
schools, our young people's gatherings to 
bear more than " three per cent net divi- 
dends - on our investment. We certainly 
in the last thirty years have not increased 
faster than three per cent annually in mem- 
bership. " By their fruits ye shall know 
them." 

In spite of the fact that one of every 
thirty of our membership is in the ministry, 
which would easily mean that one of every 
ten of our brethren of adult age is in that 
sacred position, we have churches innumer- 
able that are calling for ministerial help. 
Some great inspiration, some wonderful 
impulse, is needed to awaken our churches 
to the proper appreciation of their own 
ministering brethren, and to arouse those 
brethren to a just appreciation of the flocks 
for which they should be responsible. We 
will not be able to solve our problems of 
leadership in this generation, nor will we 
leave the solution on the way towards real- 
ity for the next, unless we seek with all 
of our power to equip spiritually and intel- 
lectually and sacrificially these hosts of 
home-trained, fireside-inspired, young peo- 
ple through the realm of our own colleges. 
The Forward Movement has assumed it to 
be one of its supreme objectives to arouse 
our brethren to this necessary fact. But 
our colleges, whatever may be their dreams, 
or the sacrifices of their college men, can- 
not touch the problem without adequate 
financial provision. Our isolated members 
call for help, and in many of their neigh- 
borhoods are to be found wonderful oppor- 




Foreign Volunteers— Bethany 



108 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1920 



tunities for new congregations; but our 
District Boards have not had the sinews of 
war, nor the consecrated men, to make such 
congregations a reality. 

One of the greatest single tasks before 
us concerns the condition of our young 
people. Many are being saved — thank 
God! — but more of them are being lost — 
shame to us! Observation leads us to be- 
lieve that our young men have not been 
drawn towards the church through their 
experience in army life; rather the reverse. 
Our young people perish for lack of sym- 
pathy; they grow indifferent for want of 
something to do; they go astray because 
no one who understands them has the 
proper amount or quality of patience to 
enter into their terrific mental and spiritual 
struggles. A tremendous task, and a won- 
derful fertile field, lies before those people 
to whom is committed the spiritual wel- 
fare of our young. But how can our Sun- 
day-school and Christian Workers' Boards 
go forward in these tasks until their finan- 
cial needs are provided? 

The war has not driven people from the 
church, nor has it drawn them towards it, 
but its influence, like the poison gas of 
hell, has floated across the world, creating 
a spiritual indifference and lethargy that 
naught but heroic efforts through the life 
of prayer upon the part of God's children 
can withstand and overcome. If the church, 
with all her power, with all her prestige, 
with all her strength, has been unable to 
overcome or even to check this progress 
towards the wrong, then should not we 



rally in one great effort to plead God's 

cause? 

This article is not written with any de- 
sire to be pessimistic. Nor is it intended to 
be such; but facts are facts, and they should 
be faced by all as they have been faced by 
the comparatively few in the formulation of 
the Forward Movement Campaign. We 
have caught something of the vision of 
what our church can do if God is allowed 
to have his way. We have pointed to some 
of the evils that canker our church life, and 
we feel the need for a mighty upheaval for 
Christ. Therefore this Forward Movement. 

Of course this article is not written to 
lead the reader to the conclusion that the 
Forward Movement will prove a panacea 
for every ill; neither is it the mind of any- 
one, so far as we know, that it can accom- 
plish all things; no one will promise that 
it will relieve all of our distresses. We 
have not the slightest notion that it, of it- 
self, can do the work; but we do believe 
that it can be the means of loosing our 
energies, awakening ourselves and drawing 
us to the place where we can be used of 
Jesus Christ to accomplish his purposes. 
Back of the Forward Movement are the 
prayers and travail of many. Those who 
labor at the task have the conviction that 
it is born of God for a very definite pur- 
pose. A renewed faith, an intensified hope, 
a new love, in the heart and life of every 
member of the church, in and for Jesus 
Christ, is fundamentally the supreme goal 
of the Forward Movement. 



ft 




Foreign Volunteers — Bridgewater 



April 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



109 



The Place of Prayer in the Life of the 
Foreign Volunteer 



Norman A. Wilson 



PRAYER, though quiet and still as the 
Spirit can be, is the chief of the vol- 
unteer's joys. Although unseen and 
unnoticed, the soul leaps out earnestly to 
its nearest and dearest Friend and Maker. 
God is the volunteer's Powerhouse and 
prayer is the connecting wire. Therefore 
a volunteer without prayer is a volunteer 
without power. 

There are two main types of prayer; in- 
tercessory prayer and prayer of worship. 
Each is vitally important to the spiritual 
life of a volunteer and either is dead with- 
out the other. 

Intercessory prayer is that form which 
petitions God. Are intercessors needed to- 
day? Well, what does intercessory prayer 
do? It brings down power from heaven 
and causes God to open his storehouse of 
blessings. Do Christians today have suf- 
ficient power? If Christians were filled 
with the power and the Spirit the world 
would be rapidly turning to Christ. Is it? 
No! Therefore we do not have sufficient 
power from on high. Why is this? Be- 
cause we do not have enough intercessors. 
Do you wonder whether this is not a ques- 
tion of quality rather than quantity? Of 
course quality figures, but the need today 
is quantity, and quantity counts in this 
case. Christ said that if two or three are 
gathered together in his name there would 



he be in their midst. Surely, if the prayers 
of two mean more than one, the prayers of 
many will mean much more. 

The prayer of worship is more the pray- 
er of thanksgiving and praise. In it we 
volunteers can talk to God and tell him 
how much we love him and thank him for 
answered prayer and blessings, both spirit- 
ual and physical. It's this side of prayer 
that puts magnetism in the prayer life. 
There could not be the tender relation be- 
tween God and us if we asked of him only 
favors and never thanked him for his kind- 
ness or told him how much we loved him. 

The place of prayer in the life of the 
foreign volunteer is first place. That is, 
it is the first of his earthly duties or min- 
istrations. Of course God is first, last and 
all the time. But prayer is our first duty 
to act and live. The fact that God is first 
makes prayer first, because prayer is the 
only way of talking to the Great Com- 
mander. If we wish him to consider our 
wants, desires and troubles we must send 
them to him on the prayer line. The Scrip- 
tures say " Pray without ceasing." This 
means that we should ever be in an atti- 
tude of prayer, be constantly in touch with 
God and have the feeling that Jesus is in 
our heart and walking by our side, speaking 
to us and guiding our thoughts, words and 
deeds. Does it pay to stop for prayer when 



t*s£fe@ 



- ■ 






? 







Foreign Volunteers— Bridgewater 



110 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1920 



we think we are so busy that we need all 
of our time for our duties? Yes. Always 
we can afford to give God a little time in 
prayer, because he is surely going to re- 
member us, when we remember him. We 
will never lose time or opportunity because 
we have talked with God. He has told us 
that he knows much better how to treat us 
than our good earthly parents do. 

God will be pleased when we foreign vol- 
unteers begin to talk with him more. He 
will be more able to tell us what his plans 
are for our lives. We have pledged our 
lives to him. Just think how anxious he 
must be to direct us to use them in the 
ways that will mean most to him! Oh, 
how Jesus must rejoice when he hears the 
expressions of the inner thoughts of the 
hearts of those who have volunteered to 
serve him to the end! And how sad he 
must be when we do not talk with him! 
We remember that upon a certain occasion 
God wondered that there were no inter- 
cessions. We are glad that he is not wor- 
ried about that today. But wait a minute; 
he is grieved because there are not more 
intercessions. Fellow volunteers, let us 
not displease this dear Father heart. Let 
us talk with him more and try to get others 
to do the same. 

The volunteer also needs to pray for his 
own good. Oh, no, this is a mistake. This 
is the way it is: we need to pray that we 
may be able to do good for Jesus. We 
have many weaknesses and we must be 
strong to be good missionaries. How are 
we going to become strong? Oh, that*s 



easy; through prayer. Be careful; maybe 
it isn't so easy as you think, because it is 
a little hard for some of us to give enough 
time in prayer. But look here now, we 
positively must do it if we are going to 
have spiritual power. And this power we 
must have on the field, because if we do 
not have it we are a predestined failure. 
Besides, there are many obstacles which 
we have to overcome. Satan may try to 
get us to forsake our purpose; in fact, he 
is trying it. We dare not forget our pur- 
pose. We must hold to it unless God wills 
otherwise. We can be victorious only 
through prayer. Sometimes the road seems 
dark and dreary, especially when we think 
of breaking home ties, and of hardships 
involved in securing our training. Let's 
pray it through and trust in the Lord al- 
ways. There is no other way, and this is 
the Lord's way. 

We need to pray that others will join 
our ranks. The Lord needs laborers and 
we need coworkers. " Pray ye therefore 
the Lord of the harvest, that he will send 
forth laborers into his harvest." 

Those who have gone before us to labor 
in foreign lands among dying souls are 
facing problems which God only can solve. 
Their lives are wearing away in the service. 
They need our prayers. We must not fail 
in our duty to pray for them. They feel 
so much better and God really does help 
them when we pray for them. They need 
the answers to our prayers and we need to 
pray. 

(Continued on Page 128) 




Foreign Volunteers— Blue Ridge 



April 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



111 



Echoes From the Blue Ridge Volunteer Band 



Edna A. Dotterer 



IT is beneficial for Mission Bands of the 
different schools of the Church of the 
Brethren to tell of the work they are 
doing, both within the school and the prac- 
tical work outside the institution. It not 
only serves as an index to the religious life 
of the school, but may inspire others to 
greater religious activity. 

The Volunteer Band of Blue Ridge Col- 
lege is one of the smaller bands. It was 
organized in the winter of 1915. Bro. H. 
P. Garner and wife, now of India, were 
with us that year and assisted with the or- 
ganization. Since that time it has been 
steadily growing, both in numbers and spir- 
ituality. At present our membership is 
twenty-five, twelve of whom are foreign 
volunteers. 

The work of the band has been of a two- 
fold nature. First, it aims to create a deep- 
er spirituality within the student body. 
This is done through personal work among 
the students and by intercessory prayer. 
The development of the prayer life is great- 
ly emphasized. We meet each Sunday 
morning at 8: 45, at which time some sub- 
ject along the line of missions is discussed 
by the different members. This meeting 
is open to all students. 

But of equal importance is the practical 
work outside of the school. It has been 



our aim for some time to reach each church 
in the Eastern District of Maryland, with 
either a program or a missionary sermon 
by one of our ministers. This year we 
have promise of approaching our goal more 
nearly than any previous year. 

We have given a number of programs, 
and a larger number have invitecf us to 
come when the spring weather makes con- 
ditions more favorable. We have prayed 
for these opportunities of service, and our 
prayers are being answered in a most won- 
derful way. 

In addition to this we have organized 
and are conducting a Sunday-school at 
Medford, Md. One of our young ministers 
is giving a teachers' training course to a 
class of colored folks. Recently they took 
their first examination and the results were 
surprising. Several had perfect papers. 

Home visiting is another phase of our 
work, but as we are located in a small 
town, there is not as much of this to be 
done as in some towns. 

Our forces are organized for the cam- 
paign to raise funds for the hospital in 
China. We are planning a liberal offering. 

We are praying daily that God may give 
us work to do, and any successes that re- 
sult serve to glorify him rather than 
ourselves. We want to be used of him. 

New Windsor, Md. 



..afi 




Foreign Volunteers — Elizabethtown 



112 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1920 



Missionary Education in Our Colleges 
and Churches 



Ezra 

EDUCATION is very desirable and 
necessary. It is desirable, because 
it is a means by which our individual 
world grows larger and more beautiful. It 
is necessary, because it shows us how to 
fit our own world into the worlds of others. 
Since all education deals ultimately with 
personalities, the true motive for acquiring 
an education should be to increase our ap- 
preciation and sympathy for others, or aug- 
ment our usefulness to them, or both. 

Education, therefore, consists of two def- 
inite processes: that of getting information 
and that of getting inspiration. In no phase 
of education is this truer than that of mis- 
sionary education. Naturally we are op- 
posed or indifferent to anything about 
which we are ignorant. Those things have 
not projected themselves into our small in- 
dividual worlds. If missions are to mean 
anything to us and to Christ's kingdom we 
certainly must get close to missions or get 
missions close to us. In other words, we 
must know the situation. 

In the first place we must be acquainted 
with missions geographically. We have 
studied geography from a political and 
commercial angle, but as followers of 
Christ we must know the world in a way 
that will include the missionary activities. 
(This means both home and foreign fields.) 



Wenger 

We speak of getting closer to the foreign 
countries and among the several States. 
This means that we are ignoring distance 
and obstacles when we desire communica- 
tion from a commercial standpoint. From 
a missionary standpoint also this can be 
done. Let us take our maps and draw our 
missionary lines and mark off routes. 

We must also be acquainted with the 
needs of these many unoccupied districts, 
and this is possibly the more important 
feature in missionary education. It goes 
without saying that to receive information 
some one must have it or have received it 
beforehand. No longer is it possible for 
anyone to excuse himself because he did 
not know. It is his business to know. The 
physician must know his medicine, the me- 
chanic must know laws of physics, and the 
farmer must know agriculture. In the 
same way the Christian must know his 
field and part in the work. And if some 
know conditions and do not make every 
effort possible to teach others, they may be 
assured that they are held responsible per- 
sonally for their neglect. 

There are many books published on prac- 
tically every phase of missions. Most of 
these are very easily read. While it is true 
one person can read such a book alone, yet 
it means ever so much more if such books 




Foreign Volunteers — Elizabethtown 



April 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



113 



are read together in a group. This will 
mean leadership by some one. In our col- 
leges it is comparatively easy to organize 
a mission study class or have voluntary 
reading circles. Since students are usually 
limited in their supply of money it is wise 
for all to buy different ones and share with 
the rest, unless the group is too large or 
others desire the book. Each college 
should have a well-supplied and up-to-date 
library of books and magazines on mis- 
sions. Not only should these be available, 
but efforts should be put forth to get all 
the students to read them. Reports from 
missionary conferences, where the informa- 
tion is first-hand and fresh, should be given 
as wide publicity as possible. Posters hav- 
ing some startling figures and other facts 
can be used with great effect because many 
students who will never read a book on 
missions or a missionary magazine will 
not fail to see a large poster at the end of 
the hall or in the library. 

Inspiration is something that is caught; 
it is the other part of missionary educa- 
tion. Again, a man must have inspiration 
before he can give inspiration. The reason 
inspiration is so necessary is because even 
when we know about conditions we must 
be inspired before we act. That usually 
means that the importance of our relation 
to the world conditions must be brought 
home to us very forcibly. This will result 
in action which is, and ever must be, the 
aim of missionary education. If knowing 
of conditions will not get men to act, then 
we must use all lawful means to get them 



to act. Keep the challenge ever before 
them. Give talks, render programs, put up 
posters, do personal work, put up a pole 
and unfurl from its top a banner inscribed 
with: "Christ claims China"; "We must 
open Africa," etc. Above all pray that God 
may direct and work upon the hearts of all 
Christians, that they may learn their busi- 
ness well and do their duty faithfully. 

Now, if missionary education is essential 
in colleges to get students to act and give 
their lives for the work of the kingdom, it 
surely is important that the Christians in 
the several churches also receive a vision 
so that they will give up their lives. Es- 
pecially should the young people be taught 
the significance of the Great Commission, 
its relation to the heathen world and their 
part in it. All elders, pastors and minis- 
ters who are up-to-date and who are doing 
their duty will see that adequate provision 
is being made to instil the missionary spirit 
in the coming generations. As to methods, 
these must be suited to the local conditions. 
However, posters are not amiss and a 
farmer can paint an inspiring message on 
the side or roof of his barn, or if living in 
town hang out a " shingle," declaring the 
message of Christ. 

No excuse will be accepted for our neg- 
ligence. Whether we are in school, on a 
farm, or in the shop, it behooves us as fol- 
lowers of Christ to get as much missionary 
education and give as much as we can, 
which means we will work for Christ and 
get others to work for him. 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 




Foreign Volunteers— Nurses in Preparation 



BRIDGEWATER COLLEGE LIBRARY 

DOinpCiUATCP VIRGINIA 



114 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1920 



Medical Missions and Missionaries 

Elliott B. Thomas 



WHEN we consider medical missions 
and medical achievements in for- 
eign lands, we enter a fascinating 
field. In this realm Christianity and ap- 
plied science meet in the gracious ministry 
of healing. He who said, " Thy sins are 
forgiven thee," also said, " Rise and walk." 
Any attempt to separate spiritual help from 
physical to save souls while ignoring bodily 
discomforts, is contrary to the recorded 
ministry of our Lord. 

The usefulness of the medical arm of the 
missionary body is indisputable. It breaks 
down opposition, dissipates prejudice and 
wins its way to the hearts and homes of 
high and low, rich and poor. It receives 
official recognition, for the foreign doctor 
is a persona grata, even in palaces and 
halls of state. 

When we recall the activities of our Lord 
while here on the earth we see him healing 
and preaching. The two are inseparable. 
Neither is successful to the greatest extent 
without the other. 

The most successful work on the mission 
field has been done where bodily pain has 
first been cared for. The one helped thus- 
gains such confidence that the telling of 
the story of love is readily listened to. The 
medical missionary gives the key to all of 
man's nature. Robert Moffat said, " A 
medical missionary is a missionary and a 
half or a double missionary." 

The need of medical missions is as im- 



perative as the wireless call, S. O. S., which 
no ship on any sea will ignore. It is im- 
perative, imperious and importunate. Can 
our ears hear the S. O. S. call of humanity? 
Can we quietly sit by and know that many 
are dying every day in the heathen coun- 
tries from diseases that are preventable? 
It is said that 95 per cent of all the deaths 
in India occur without the ministry of a 
doctor. " Oh, that we had eyes and ears to 
hear!" 

In China the need of the Christian physi- 
cian springs not so much from the absence 
of native doctors as from their presence. 
Malpractice, based on pseudo-science, has 
cursed China for years. If the Chinese are 
a hardy race it is partly because only the 
hardiest could survive their doctors. " The 
practice of medicine in China is unlicensed 
and usually hereditary." 

Does India need medical education? In 
that land there are few sewers, even in the 
largest cities, where holiness and dirt have 
been for centuries associated, where people 
drink holy water from stagnant tanks cov- 
ered with foul scum, where thousands daily 
bathe and wash and drink standing waist 
deep in the Ganges — while dead bodies 
float past in the stream. In such a land 
medicine is a boon beyond belief. 

Oh, that we, as blessed Americans, could 
appreciate the condition we are in! We 
have doctors within a few minutes' ride 
or walk from each home — many of them, 




Foreign Volunteers— Doctors in Preparation 



April 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



115 



so that if we are unable to get one there 
is another. What if we were one of the 
two million in China who have as their al- 
lowance a single doctor? There is one 
medical missionary in the heathen coun- 
tries to as many people as live in the city of 
London, while in the United States it has 
been put as low as one physician to every 
273 people. 

By the heathen the medical missionary is 
readily understood and appreciated. He 
can gain confidence, establish friendly re- 
lations and by sympathy and kindness win 
souls to Christ. This might be impossible 
for any one else to do. But the duties of 
the doctor do not stop with the healing of 
the body. He brings to the suffering not 
only comfort for the bodily pain, bait peace 
in relation to the great hereafter. The doc- 
tor can not leave to the evangelist all the 
telling of the story of love, for if he did 
the patient whom he has just healed would 
think this part of it must be a secondary 
matter. 

Were it not for the fact that many of 
the pioneers in the mission fields were 
physicians, Christianity would not hold the 
place in the heathen countries which it 
does today. David Livingstone won Af- 
rica through his medicine chest. Peter 
Parker opened China with his lancet. Dr. 
Allen saved the life of the Korean prince 
after native doctors had tried to stop the 
flow of blood with sealing wax, and thus 
he opened a kingdom to Christ. 

But when we speak of medical missions 



we are sometimes misunderstood, for there 
are medical missions and medical missions, 
and the true aim should be to have the lat- 
ter. I do not believe any medical mission- 
ary ever went to a field with the sole idea 
of seeing how many sick people he could 
make well and to let it go at that. But 
there was a deeper feeling — the feeling of 
the helplessness of the many unfortunate 
peoples of the world, the many who knew 
not our God, who needed both physical 
and spiritual comfort. He, seeing the great 
need and letting this be his call, went and 
ministered to them and they received him. 

The medical missionary is a fact in har- 
mony with Christ's command. Compas- 
sion requires his work, wisdom approves 
it, and experience proclaims its value. 

The medical missionary, in the midst of a 
multitude around him on bended knee, im- 
ploring his ministrations, is not unlike him 
of old who made the blind to see, the lame 
to walk, raised the dead and preached to 
the poor, for the Word says, " I was naked 
and ye clothed me, sick and ye visited me, 
in prison and ye came to me." 

To know that millions are perishing, 
body and soul, to possess the means which 
might save both and then to withhold the 
same and let them perish is — WHAT? 

11 A little while for winning souls to Jesus, 
Ere we behold his beauty, face to face; 

A little while for healing souls' diseases, 
By telling others of a saving grace." 

La Verne, Calif. 



^T; 


% $fc f f 


* 


*3 





Foreign Volunteers — Manchester 



116 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1920 



Why I Am Going to Africa 



C. O. Miller 



MANY a morning have I stood on 
the porch of my house, and, look- 
ing northward, have seen the 
smoke arise from villages that have never 
heard of Jesus Christ. I have seen at dif- 
ferent times the smoke of a thousand vil- 
lages — villages whose people are without 
Christ, without God and without hope in 
the world." So spoke the great pioneer of 
Africa, Robert Moffat, and the words fell 
on the ears of David Livingstone, who, 
fired by the thought of a thousand villages 
without God and Christ, tramped thou- 
sands of miles, waded malarial swamps, 
forded streams, was robbed, attacked, and 
finally died in Africa for those thousand 
villages. 

Those villages, and many more like them, 
still exist. But now they are faced not 
only by the ignorance of the religion of 
Christ, but by the two great evils which 
are now menacing the future of Africa. 
The path to Central Africa, blazed by the 
indomitable courage of Livingstone, is still 
open, waiting to be traversed. 

Africa's future is undetermined. Before 
her lie two great evils and one hope, with 
neither an alternative of neutrality nor of 
conservatism to her present condition. Her 
future is not within her own power. In 
North Africa is the stronghold of Moham- 
medanism. Jt is pushing its frontier into 
Central Africa, just as rapidly as swords 
and traders can take it. What does Mo- 



hammedanism have for Africa? (1) A re- 
ligion of warfare. (2) A religion that dis- 
regards the soul of a woman. (3) A re- 
ligion that countenances a life of licentious- 
ness. (4) A religion whose founder ad- 
mitted that he, had sinned. (5) A religion 
that leaves the heart as unregenerate as be- 
fore. 

This is one of the evils that are facing 
Africa and are desirous of determining her 
future for her. 

In South Africa, in a relatively small dis- 
trict as compared with Mohammedan Af- 
rica, is an area which is predominantly 
Christian, and in Eastern Africa, near the 
equator, lies historic Uganda. While there 
are missions in Africa that are not within 
these areas, these are the only areas that 
are predominantly Christian. In these 
areas lies the hope of Africa. 

Several years ago Krapf conceived the 
idea of staying the Mohammedan advance 
by forming a chain of missions across the 
Sudan. This same view is today held by 
the missionaries of Africa and is the policy 
of the Sudan United Mission. If the Chris- 
tian churches respond to the formation of 
the chain of missions, the evil will be 
stopped and Africa can be Christianized. 

The problem of evangelizing Africa lies 
not only in displacing the religion already 
there, but in protecting her from the ag- 
gression of a religion which will be ex- 
ceedingly detrimental to her. The one hope 




Foreign Volunteers— Manchester 



April 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



117 



that lies before Africa, in contrast to the 
evil mentioned, is the Christian religion. 
It too is trying to determine the future of 
Africa. 

The second evil that faces Africa is a 
godless civilization and commercial greed. 
C. H. Patton says, " Africa, far more than 
any other field, is affected by the influx of 
the selfish white man." Already the trader 
has gone through Africa in his own selfish 
interests. 

Africa is divided among European na- 
tions, except for Abyssinia and Liberia. 
The natives are very simple-hearted, and, 
having no civilization of their own, are un- 
able to resist one when thrust upon them. 
To the discredit of European civilization 
are the glaring evils — land robbery, wars 
of oppression, unjust taxation, cattle pests, 
human diseases introduced by Europeans, 
liquor traffic, contemptuous treatment of 
natives, and enforced labor, which is slav- 
ery. 

These evils are intensified by the influx 
of ideas from the south. The. gold and 
diamond mines are located in South Africa. 
Natives, uncivilized, from the northern 
parts, go south to work in these mines. 
While there they come in touch with mod- 
ern civilization, telephones, electric cars, 
electric lights, etc. In these mining towns 
vice is rampant; liquor, gambling, immoral- 
ity and disease are rife. After six or eight 
months of such life, they return to their 
people, carrying with them the vices of 
civilization. Other natives move south- 
ward to take the place of those that first 



left: thus a constant stream results, carry- 
ing the vices back to their tribes. They 
receive them without the counteracting 
force of the Christian religion. It is esti- 
mated that three-quarters of a million na- 
tives thus come in contact with civilization. 
These have a tremendous influence upon 
the future of Africa. 

Again, the church is the hope of Africa. 
It is the church that can prepare the na- 
tives to ward off these vices and counter- 
act those which are present. It is the 
Christian church that can give to Africa a 
code which will hold out to her a bright 
future. But it will require hard and per- 
sistent efforts. 

I have presented the reason for Living- 
stone's work in Africa. I have shown three 
forces, each of which can determine the 
future of Africa. Africa is now in the crisis 
of her history. 

Why am I going to Africa? To help the 
cause of Christ build the chain of missions 
across Africa and to check Mohammedan- 
ism, and not only to give to them the Chris- 
tian religion, but also to protect them from 
the ravages of godless civilization and com- 
mercial greed. 

North Manchester, Ind. 

Since Christmas quite a few people of 
Shouyang, our new station in China, have 
been taking special interest in studying the 
Bible, and to give them an opportunity for 
special study the native evangelist there 
has taken up the book of Mark and is meet- 
ing with the class three times each week. 




Foreign Volunteers— Manchester 



118 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1920 



Mountain Missions of the South 



Lewis 

THE call can be heard from the 
Southland, " Come and give us the 
Gospel of Jesus Christ and the edu- 
cational and social uplift, which only Chris- 
tianity has for the benighted people of the 
earth." 

One of the most interesting as well as 
most beautiful sections of this country is 
that region of the Southern States trav- 
ersed by the southwestern range of the 
Appalachian system. This mountain re- 
gion, about five hundred miles long and 
two hundred and fifty miles wide, consti- 
tutes a highland empire, " without seacoast 
or bay, inland lake or navigable stream." It 
includes large portions of Virginia, West 
Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North and 
South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama. 
Possibly two-thirds of the total population 
live in the cities along the rivers and rail- 
roads. These people enjoy the ordinary 
advantages of town and village life. These 
are not the ones who need the help of mis- 
sionary work. The remaining third, who 
make their homes in the secluded and lone- 
ly gullies and glens among the mountains, 
and wring a precarious living from the 
poorly-tilled clearings on the sunny slopes 
of the hills, have none of the advantages of 
their neighbors. 

These sturdy mountaineers are the de- 
scendant's of the Scotch-Irish who fled to 
America to escape religious persecution. 
They rushed west and south into' these 
mountainous regions which were especially 



Nay lor 

congenial to them. Here they have lived 
almost untouched by the influences around 
them. 

This condition created a social isolation 
comparable only to the physical isolation 
which characterizes their mountain homes. 

The stern and solitary life in the moun- 
tains has tended to fashion characters 
strong, fearless, and kind, but extremely ex- 
clusive and ignorant. 

Through successive generations many 
thousands of these highlanders have be- 
come poorer, more exclusive, and more ig- 
norant, until now their condition is about 
as bad as it can be for civilized people. 

Their homes usually are cabins of but one 
room, containing a huge fireplace. Their 
furniture and utensils are few and very 
crude. Sometimes there is a bed in the 
house, but often there is nothing but the 
rough floor. The family is always large, 
frequently numbering ten or even fifteen 
children. In certain sections ignorance and 
isolation have led to intermarriage, which 
is destroying the vitality of the race. 

The products are few, consisting of ap- 
ples, corn, pork, and occasionally chickens 
and eggs, though sometimes the more pro- 
gressive will own a clearing where a fair 
crop of wheat or garden vegetables is 
raised. 

Hospitality and homely kindness are 
characteristic of these rude mountain dwell- 
ers, and a stranger who stops at some hum- 
ble cabin on the mountain side will be giv- 




Foreign Volunteers — McPherson 



April 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



119 



en the most generous service which the 
host's limitations will permit. 

The mountaineer is strong in his friend- 
ships and also in his animosities. This 
spirit has kept alive the feud, the curse of 
the hills. 

Education, Christian education, is the 
great lack of these people. Many of their 
errors and faults are due to ignorance. 
Schools have been practically unknown 
among them for years. Very often, in an 
entire county one-half of the children have 
never been inside a schoolhouse and one- 
half of the voters can neither read nor 
write. 

Even where the local schools are estab- 
lished they are in session only one to four 
months out of the year, and the teachers 
often are not fitted at all for the task. 

Yet the people themselves, especially of 
the younger generation, are anxious for the 
privileges of education, as appears in the 
plaint of the little boy who said, " My pa 
jes' growed up and never knowed nothin,' 
and so did his pa before him. Sometimes 
when I be hoein' corn on the mountain 
side I look up the crick and down the crick, 
and wonders if there ain't nobody never 
comin' to larn me nothin'." Needless to 
say, with this ignorance, illiteracy and 
superstition abound. 

Isolation has made the mountaineer a 
law unto himself in many respects. Jus- 
tices of the peace and ministers being 
scarce, marriage was more easily entered 
upon than by troubling the law. And in 
proportion as marriage is simply a matter 



of choice, so also is divorce. Laxity in the 
home relations never promotes strong and 
enduring family life. 

In spite of his lawlessness, ignorance, 
feuds, and superstitions, the mountaineer 
has always maintained a respect for reli- 
gious subjects, and no matter how check- 
ered his career he probably will regard him- 
self as having " got religion." Among 
these people to " get religion " means only 
to experience a sudden emotional frenzy, 
with no subsequent change of life or con- 
duct. Their religious creed has been 
handed down for generations and is so dis- 
torted that in some cases it falls little short 
of heathenism. 

The results that have been obtained in 
the mission work done among these peo- 
ple highly justifies the cause. The boys and 
girls of the mountain are quick to learn. 
Many if not most of the schools have ap- 
plications from more pupils than they can 
accommodate. One mission reports that 
more than fifty girls have been turned 
away from the girls' school, and several 
boys are waiting for entrance to the boys' 
department. But of even greater signifi- 
cance is the new religious awakening mak- 
ing itself felt throughout the mountain dis- 
tricts. It is certainly indicated in the re- 
ports which tell of hundreds of lives made 
over, and thousands, while not openly con- 
fessing Christ, bless the missionaries and 
their work. 

The mountainous character of the field 
and its scattered population make the work 
by no means easy, and in but few instances 

(Continued on Page 128) 




Foreign Volunteers — McPherson 



120 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1920 



Why Attend the Annual Conference at Sedalia? 



Miles Blickenstaff 



ONE of the very hopeful things about 
the Church of the Brethren is the 
new type of Annual Conference 
which we are developing. Any institution, 
in order to do the most efficient work, 
must have organization and laws, and per- 
haps must change them from time to time; 
but simply to make laws is not sufficient. 
Jesus did not draw up a set of laws for 
the guidance of his apostles after he was 
gone, but he quickened the lives of his fol- 
lowers with the inspiration of his own life, 
and they went forth to do the work that 
was to be done. I wonder where we would 
be if Jesus had placed in the hands of some 
of even the best men of his day, a set of 
rules to follow to accomplish the great 
work without changing their lives by con- 
tact with his own life and inspiration. 

The great convention at Des Moines, 
Iowa, for which thousands of dollars was 
spent, was not to make laws, but to create 
enthusiasm and inspiration in the lives of 
the eight thousand students who attended 
it. Our Conference is not so much to get 
people not to do things as to get them to 
do things. 

Ask any religious leader, and he will 
tell you that there is an almost inestimable 
value in inspirational conferences. That 
the Interchurch World Movement recog- 
nizes this, is seen by the national, State 
and county conventions which are being 
held. The success of the movement, hu- 



manly speaking, lies in the success of these 
inspirational conventions. Very little of 
the time, not over one-tenth, is given to or- 
ganization, the rest being devoted to cre- 
ating interest and enthusiasm in the work 
of the church. 

It was my privilege to attend, last year, 
the Conference at Winona Lake, where for 
the first time the life work of young peo- 
ple was given an important part on the pro- 
grams. The meetings were very inspira- 
tional, and I am sure that many young peo- 
ple — and older ones, too — received a large 
amount of inspiration and enthusiasm for 
Christian service. It is a splendid oppor- 
tunity and privilege, and even a duty, for 
every one who can to attend the Confer- 
ence at Sedalia, Mo., this spring. 

If there are those who think it designates 
them as a " back number " to belong to the 
Church of the Brethren, I am sure that 
they will change their mind if they will get 
next to some of the big movements which 
the church is undertaking. 

If you want to feel the thrill of having 
assisted in accomplishing a great task, get 
into the Forward Movement with all your 
might, and then come to Conference and 
feel the enthusiasm when the million-dol- 
lar offering is taken. 

If you want to become acquainted with 
the great tasks of the world that the church 
is undertaking — tasks that are waiting for 
the young life of the church — come to 




Foreign Volunteers— McPherson 



April 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



121 



Sedalia and attend the " Life Work Confer- 
ence " the first few days of the meeting. 

If you wish to take a short trip through 
our colleges and to some of the mission 
fields of the world, come to Conference, 
and while there visit the missionary ex- 
hibit room and study it until it grips your 
lives and makes you desire to prepare your- 
self in one of our colleges for some of the 
big work which is waiting. 

Perhaps some one will say there are lots 
of other conventions and conferences from 
which he can get more good for the time 
and money expended. Perhaps that is true, 
and it is a good thing to attend all the 
great conventions possible, but you can- 



not successfully work with the church un- 
less you know something of its plans and 
policies. You cannot be enthusiastic for 
an institution about which you know noth- 
ing. Right now, when the church is tak- 
ing one of the biggest steps forward and 
is undertaking some of the most stupen- 
dous tasks that she has ever assumed, is 
an opportune time for every one to get in- 
to the life of the church for the great For- 
ward Movement. Therefore, I appeal to 
everyone who can, young or old, to attend 
the Conference at Sedalia and get into the 
big work. Come in time for the first meet- 
ing and stay until the last. 
McPherson, Kans. 



What Constitutes a Call to the Foreign Field? 



Densie Hollinger 



THE hour is here for the extension of 
Christianity to the wide world. Pro- 
grams are rapidly expanding where- 
by this may be done. 

There is pressing need for money and 
men, and the greater of these two is the 
unsolved problem — how to secure an ade- 
quate supply of qualified men and women. 
It is estimated that one million new leaders 
will be needed in the next five years for 
the ministry and mission fields alone. 

Where will they be found? Every young 
person who hears that call and with reso- 
lute purpose faces the need will in some 
way answer the question for himself. He 
will say, " It is for me to go to the foreign 
field or for me to serve at home." But 
how will you know whether to go or stay? 
What will you take as a call from God to 
go or a call from your Father to labor in 
America? What constitutes a call to the 
foreign field? Do you wish you had the 
answer now from God? Are you wonder- 
ing how you will find out what God wants 
you to do? It is a matter of no conse- 
quence how God reveals his will to you; 
what you want to know is what that will 
is. You will be disappointed if you expect 
it to be different from a call to any other 
service, or if you think there ought to be 
some unusual, strange feeling. Your call 
may be very unlike that which came to 
Isaiah and Paul. Probably it will come in 



a quiet, rational way. The decision will 
have to be made by you; your friends may 
advise well, but each soul is alone responsi- 
ble to God. 

No; what you want is God's will for the 
world. Leave those thoughts of self. The 
Father is now asking you, his son, to look 
at his vineyard. Study its size. See that 
in this part the grapes are gathered, but 
over there is a vast section where there are 
no workers, and the grapes — why, they will 
soon be too bad to harvest. Seeing that, if 
you were just a servant, you would know 
what to do. 

You take your stand by your Father 
again with ear intent; listen with him, to 
the cry of the hungry, starving world — the 
big, needy world — almost spent, it is. 

Then let reason be your guide. How 




Hebron's Foreign Volunteer 



122 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1920 



would you regard that hunger cry if it were 
in your neighborhood? 

Sit by him with the Book open; let him 
point his finger to that last command, " Go 
ye and make disciples of all the nations." 

Now, while your heart is yet swelling 
and the Master stays, is your choice made 
to go, or remain? Yes, I know it is made. 
You let him plant his purpose in your heart 
while you stood by him and felt his love. 
It was just so with Livingstone and nine- 
tenths of the great missionaries. They 
went out of a sense of duty. Just so Paul's 
path was determined by the indications of 
the Spirit, while he was purposing to go 
on. Yes, you are moving right on out to 
where the cry is, with Jesus. 

Nokesville, Va. 

India Notes 

Anetta C. Mow 

THE month of January opened with 
a few days of rain. This was very 
unusual for this season of the year. 
It caused considerable loss to the farmers. 
Had it lasted much longer, we fear it would 
have helped to spread influenza and pneu- 
monia. 

Influenza has revisited Anklesvar. At 
present little Daniel Stover is sick, he be- 
ing the last one in their family to get it. 
Sister Stover still is weak. 



Ida Himmelsbaugh has been at Ankles- 
var, nursing the sick most of this month. 

Kathryn Ziegler also was down for a 
week. She is well again, and is out in her 
tent, touring in the villages. Eliza Miller 
has been busy caring for others since she 
recovered from a hard attack of bronchitis 
and malaria. 

We feel keenly the loss of two of our 
college girls, Miriam Asha and Shanti Mita. 
They came home from college, sick with 
pneumonia, and died within a few days. 
Miriam had been with us since she was 
about four years old. Shanti lost her moth- 



er, sister and brother in the influenza epi- 
demic of 1918. ^ 

At present, Bro. Holsopple is at Dahanu 
under the doctor's care. He had been home 
at Vali little more than a week when he 
returned to Dahanu. For a month after 
their arrival in India the Holsopple family 
remained at Dahanu, so that Frances might 
have the doctor's care. 

J* 
Joseph Pittenger was baptized Jan. 16. 
We are glad to welcome these little mis- 
sionaries into the church. During the last 
year Daniel Stover, Albert Long, Lois 
Ebey and Ruth Ross also were baptized. 

Jan. 3, Bulsar had her love feast. Bro. 
Lichty officiated. The next morning he 
preached in Gujarati. 

Dahanu reports that fo^rty communed at 
their recent love feast, fourteen of them 
being new converts. 

At Agaswan, a little village near Vyara, 
we enjoyed a love-feast occasion last week. 
About thirty men and ten women entered 
into the service. 

Sister Alice Ebey writes that they now 
have twenty girls and thirty-three boys in 
their two boarding-schools at Ahwa. Jan. 
11 they had two hundred and eight in Sun- 
day-school. ^ 

The first District Meeting held in the 
Marathi territory, as a separate District, 
met at Ahwa in the Dangs Jan. 27-29. As 
yet we have received no reports, but we 
know they are having a good meeting. 
Jl 

At Vyara, building work has been begun 
on the new piece of mission land. The 
foundations for a bungalow and the well 
are being dug. But along with this work, 
opposition has come. Some officials are 
disputing our right to this land and will de- 
prive us of it if they can. We are praying 
that God's work shall not be hindered. 

Ten men and three women have lately 
entered the Gujarati Training College. 
Vyara, India. 



April 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



123 




CIAL HEWS!? 




FINANCIAL REPORT FOR FEBRUARY 

During February the Board sent out 102,150 pages 
of tracts. 

Corrections: The $1,000.00 credited to Enoch Der- 
rick, Northeastern Kansas, for India School Dormi- 
tories, in the January Visitor, should be credited 
to Northeastern District of Kansas for this purpose. 
The $35 credited to Bethel S. S., Everett Cong., in 
March Visitor for India Boarding School, should be 
credited to Bethel S. S., Yellow Creek Cong., for 
this purpose. The $40 credited to Unity Aid Society, 
Northern Virginia, for Anklesvar Girls' Boarding 
School, in the March Visitor should be divided as 
follows: $20 for the Ping Ting Hospital Adminis- 
tration Building, China, and $20 for the Anklesvar 
Girls' Boarding School, India. The $50 credited to 
Linville Creek Aid Society, Northern Virginia, for 
Ping Ting Hospital Administration Building, in the 
March Visitor should be $25 for Ping Ting Hospital 
Administration Building and $25 for Anklesvar 
Girls' Boarding-school. 

WORLD-WIDE 
Pennsylvania— $268.20 

Middle District, Congregation 

Spring Run, $ 7 45 

Sunday-school Classes 

Shining Star, Lewistown, $25; Soul Win- 
ners, Spring Run, $12, 37 00 

Individual 

Ada White 3 00 

Western District, Congregation 

Pittsburgh, 6 00 

Sunday-schools 

Rayman, $61; Circuit No. 5, $20 81 00 

Individuals 

Thomas Hardin and Son, $1; S. A. Mey- 
ers, 50c; R. E. Reed, $11.40, 12 90 

Eastern District, Congregations 

West Greentree, $83.15; Reading, $2 85 15 

Individuals 

S. S. Lint, $12; Amanda S. Miller, $1; 
Samuel H. Hertzler, $15; Lethe A. Lis- 

key, $1.20, 29 20 

Southern District, Individuals 

W. G. Group (Mar. Not.), 50c; David 

Hostetter, $6 6 50 

Virginia— $5,101.38 

Eastern District, Congregation 

Valley, '. 10 00 

Ministerial Association, 22 61 

Individuals 

H. C. Reed, $3; J. M. Garber, $1.20; E. 

E. Blough, $1, 5 20 

Second District, Individuals 

Nannie J. Miller, 40c; G. A. Moomaw, $3; 

J. W. and Elva Hevener, $16.01, 19 41 

First District, Congregation 

Mt. Joy, 7 20 

Sunday-school 

Pleasant View, 2196 

Individual 

N. I. Buck, 2 00 

Northern District, Congregation 

Linville Creek 10 00 

Individuals 

H. S. Hine, $2; Nancy Smith, $1; Elsie 

Showalter (deceased), $5,000, 5,003 00 

Indiana— $64.10 

Southern District, Congregations 

Mt. Pleasant, $5; Nettle Creek, $36 41 00 

Individuals 

Rosetta Arndt, $1.80; R. M. Arndt, $2.30, 4 10 

Northern District, Individuals 

E. M. Rowe, $1; E. W. Bowers, $1 2 00 

Middle District, Sunday-school 

Bible Class, Peru, 17 00 

Ohio— $127.27 

Northwestern District, Congregation 

Silver Creek 38 62 



Individual 

John Yoder, 50 

Southern District, Individuals 

Viola and Mary Miller, 15 00 

Northeastern District, Sunday-schools 

Young Men's Class, Akron, $23.15; Mis- 
sionary Bible, Black River, $40, 63 15 

Individual 

Emma Kyser 10 00 

Maryland— $196.77 

Middle District, Congregation 

Manor, 30 00 

Individuals 

Susanna Newcomer, $1; Caleb Long, $20, 21 00 

Eastern District, Congregation 

Blue Ridge, 54 50 

Sunday-school 

Grossnickles, 9102 

Individual 

J. Oscar Miller, 25 

Iowa— $219.81 

Northern District, Congregation 

Greene, 7 81 

Individuals 

W. S. Rodeffer, $100; Mrs. Sarah Leh- 
man, $100; H. C. Shelter, $10; Julia A. 
Sheller, $2, 212 00 

West Virginia— $121.57 

First District, Sunday-school 

Beaver Run, 14 42 

Individuals 

Mrs. D. L. Cassady, $1; Mrs. Nora M. 
Bane, $1; W. W. Bane and wife, $100, .... 102 00 
Second District, Individual 

A Brother, Simpson, 5 15 

Illinois— $42.16 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Polo 26 40 

Individual 

Ezra Flory, 100 

Southern District, Christian Workers 

Astoria, 739 

Individual 

Geo. W. Danner 7 37 

Oklahoma— $31.00 
Christian Workers 

Washita, 25 00 

Individuals 

Mrs. Jesse Spain, $5; Charity Holsing- 

er, $1, 6 00 

Idaho— $6.20 
Christian Workers 

Nezperce 5 00 

Individual 

R. A. Orr 120 

Colorado— $17.60 

Western District, Congregation 

First Grand Valley, 4 00 

Sunday-school 

Fruita, n 60 

Southeastern District, Individuals 

J. A. Stonebraker, $1; Ira Fasnacht, $1,.. 2 00 

California— $17.91 
Northern District, Individuals 

G. H. Brubaker, $3; Zella Carroll, $1.75; 

B. T. Hedger and wife, $1, 5 75 

Southern District, Congregation 

Hermosa, 12 16 

Nebraska— $51.00 
Individuals 

Daniel and Lydia Frantz, $50; Mrs. Sarah 

E. Shaffer, $1 5100 

Minnesota— $100.00 

Siddie Ann Plaine Est. 100 00 

Washington— $6.00 
Individual 

W. C. Lehman, 6 00 



124 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1920 



Kansas— $117.04 

Southwestern District, Congregation 

McPherson 115 54 

Individuals 

Fannie Stevens, $1; W. B. Devilbiss 

(Mar. Not.\ 50c \ 150 

North Dakota— $43.93 
Congregation 

Pleasant Valley, 17 93 

Individual 

D. R. Baldwin, s 26 00 

Montana — $7.65 
Sunday-school 

Galpin Union, 6 65 

Individual 

Mrs. Calvin Richwine, 100 

Louisiana — $12.50 
Individuals 

John and Lucy Metzger, 12 50 

New Jersey— $1.00 

Individual 

Mrs. John Small, 100 

Tennessee — $15.00 
Individuals 

Mrs. L. C. and L. D. Klepper, 15 00 

North Carolina— $5.80 
Individual 

Mrs. Avery Cochran, 5 80 

South Carolina— $10.00 

Individual 

J. I. Branscom, 10 00 

Wisconsin — $1 .00 
Individual 

A Sister, * 00 

Total for the month, $ 6,584 89 

Conference offering, 772 57 

Previously reported, 165,979 59 

Total for the year $173,337 05 

Total for the World-wide Fund should have been 
$165,979.59 in the March Visitor. 

INDIA MISSION 
Idaho— $46 00 

Congregation M< 

Weiser, 2100 

Individuals 

John Wilsey and wife, 25 00 

Pennsylvania — $19-65 

Middle District, Congregation 

Leamersville, 19 65 

Minnesota— $50.00 
Individuals 

W. S. Ramer and wife, 50 00 

Virginia— $5.00 

Eastern District, Congregation 

Valley, 5 00 

Ohio— $2.15 

Northeastern District, Individual 

Phoebe Smith 15 

Northwestern District, Individual 

Emma Kyser, 2 00 

Michigan— $5.00 
Individual 

Mrs. Alice Swanstra, 5 00 

Wisconsin— $2.00 

Individual 

A Sister 2 00 

Illinois— $1.00 

Northern District, Individual 
Julia Ellen Porter 100 

Total for the month, $ 130 80 

Previously reported, 1,765 82 

Total to date $ 1,896 62 

INDIA BOARDING SCHOOL 

Pennsylvania— $142.00 

Eastern District, Aid Societies 

Conestoga, $12; Spring Run, $25 37 00 

Middle District, Congregation 

Koontz 3500 



Sunday-school 

Williamsburg, 35 00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Ever Ready Class, York, 35 00 

Indiana— $43.75 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Fairview, 35 00 

Middle District, Sunday-school 

Willing Workers, Ogans Creek, 8 75 

Virginia— $88.00 

First District, Sunday-school 

Oak Grove, 35 00 

Individual 

W. P. Crumpacker, 35 00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Willing Workers, Summit 18 00 

Ohio— $70.00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Bear Creek, 20 00 

Aid Society 

Eversole, 35 00 

Individuals 

Viola and Mary Miller, 15 00 

Illinois — $35.00 

Northern District, Individual 

A Brother, 35 00 

Missouri — $20.00 

Northern District, Individual 

E. N. Huffman, 20 00 

Maryland— $10.00 

Eastern District, Sunday-school 

Primary and Junior Dept., Blue Ridge,.. 10 00 

Michigan— $15.00 
Individual 

Morris Weisel, 15 00 

Oregon— $1.00 
Individual 

Mrs. Emma Blankenship, 1 00 

Total for the month, $ 424 75 

Previously reported, 6,80134 

Total to date, $ 7,226 09 

INDIA ORPHANAGE 

Pennsylvania— $193.98 

Eastern District, Sunday-schools 

Litjtz, $70; Missionary Workers, Leban- 
on, $25, 95 00 

Individual 

Monroe HolHnger, 35 00 

Southeastern District, Christian Workers 

Parker Ford, 20 00 

Sunday-school 

Parker Ford, 20 00 

Middle District, Christian Workers 

Spring Run, 20 00 

Western District, Sunday-school 

Uniontown, 3 98 

Indiana — $8.76 

Southern District, Individual 

A Brother 8 76 

Northern District, Aid Society 

Bethany, 20 00 

Wisconsin— $200 
Individual 

A Sister 2 00 

Total for the month $ 224 74 

Previously reported 584 10 

Total for the year, $ 808 84 

INDIA SHARE PLAN 

Pennsylvania— $277.50 

Eastern District, Sunday-school 

Maple Spring, > 15 00 

Aid Society 

Elizabethtown 50 00 

Individuals 

Mrs. Annie E. Koontz, $50; W. A. With- 
ers, $50, 10000 

Middle District, Congregations 

Ardenheim, $50; Williamsburg, $50 100 00 

Southeastern District, Individuals 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. R. Keim 12 50 



April 

1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



125 



Indiana— $90.00 

Middle District, Christian Workers 

North Manchester 50 00 

Sunday-school 

South Bend, First Church 15 00 

Northern District, Individual 

O. L. Harley, 12 50 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Loyal Workers, Union City, 12 50 

Virginia— $71.00 

Eastern District, Christian Workers 

Manassas, 7100 

Missouri — $25.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Sunbeam Class, Plattsburg 25 00 

Iowa— $50.00 

Middle District, Sunday-school 

Welcome Band, Prairie City 50 00 

Ohio— $25.00 

Northwestern District, Individuals 

Jos. Groff and wife, 25 00 

Nebraska— $36.89 
Sunday-school 

Alvo 26 89 

Christian Workers 

Kearney 10 00 

New York— $12.50 
Sunday-school 

Brooklyn, 12 50 

North Dakota— $50.00 
Individual 

Mary Weaver, 50 00 

Total for the month, $ 637 89 

Previously reported, 3,736 50 

Total to date, $ 4,374 39 

INDIA NATIVE WORKER 
Virginia— $75.00 

First District, Individuals 

Mrs. B. R. Ikenberry, $30; Mrs. S. B. 

Woodson, $30 60 00 

Second District, Aid Society 

Bridgewater 15 00 

Maryland— $57.50 

Eastern District, Sunday-schools 

Edgewood, $5; Garber Bible Class, Wash- 
ington City, $52.30, 57 50 

Pennsylvania— $50.00 

Middle District, Christian Workers 

Dry Valley 50 00 

Idaho— $40.00 
Sunday-school 

Boise Valley 40 00 

Missouri — $10.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Wakenda 10 00 

Kansas— $9.00 

Northeastern District, Sunday-school 

Onward Circle Class, Sabetha 9 00 

Total for the month $ 241 50 

Previously reported 1,572 45 

Total for the year $ 1,813 95 

ANKLESVAR GIRLS' SCHOOL BUILDING 

Pennsylvania— $50.00 

Western District, Aid Society 

Rummel 50 00 

Illinois and Wisconsin — $30.00 

Northern 111. and Wis. Aid Societies, 30 00 

Virginia— $20.00 

Northern District, Congregation 

Garber, 20 00 

Ohio— $10.00 

Northwestern District, Aid Society 

Fostoria 10 00 

California— $10.00 

Southern District, Aid Society 

Covina, 10 00 

Washington— $10.00 
Aid Society 

Olympia 10 00 



Arizona— $7.00 

Individual 

Mrs. L. R. Kagarise 7 00 

Colorado— $5.00 

Northeastern District, Aid Society 

Sterling, 5 00 

Total for the month, $ 142 00 

Previously reported, 686 82 

Total for the year, $ 828 82 

INDIA SCHOOL DORMITORIES 
Kansas— $1,000.00 

Northeastern District Congregations, 1,000 00 

Total for the month $ 1,000 00 

Previously reported 1,025 00 

Total for the year, $ 2,025 00 

INDIA FAMINE 
Michigan— $50.00 

Individual 

Walter Kimmel 50 00 

Pennsylvania— $31.75 

Middle District, Sunday-school 

Women's Organized Class, Williamsburg, 11 75 

Eastern District, Sunday-school 

Harrisburg, 20 00 

Ohio— $6.00 

Northwestern District, Individuals 

Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Werking, 6 00 

Wisconsin — $5.00 
Individual 

Lizzie McAddams 5 00 

Illinois— $2.00 

Northern District, Individual 

Julia Ellen Porter, 2 00 

Total for the month, $ 94 75 

Previously reported, 6,607 85 

Total for the year, $ 6,702 60 

INDIA WIDOWS' HOME 

California— $7.00 

Southern District, Aid Society 

So. Los Angeles Aid 5 00 

Individual 

Mrs. A. H. Daniel 2 00 

Pennsylvania— $3.38 

Western District, Sunday-school 

Summit 3 38 

Wisconsin — $2.00 
Individual 

A Sister, 2 00 

Total for the month, $ 12 38 

Previously reported, 118 10 

Total for the year, $ 130 48 

QUINTER MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 
California— $5.00 

Southern District, Individual 
Receipt No. 46976, 5 00 

Total for the month, $ 5 00 

Previously reported 616 25 

Total for the year, $ 621 25 

CHINA MISSION 
Minnesota— $65.05 
Congregation 

Morrill, 15 05 

Individuals 

W. S. Ramer and wife, 50 00 

Michigan— $21.15 
Sunday-school 

Shepherd, 19 15 

Individuals 

Mrs. Hannah Crowell, $1; E. B. Wei- 
rich, $1, 200 

California— $6.00 

Southern District, Individuals 

Receipt No. 46975, $5; S. B. Kuhn, $1 6 00 



126 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1920 



Ohio— $6.25 

Northwestern District, Individual 

Emma Ky ser, 5 00 

Southern District, Individuals 

Sarah Stover, $1; Catherine Huff, 25c,... 1 25 

Indiana— $2.00 
Southern District, Individuals 

Junias Spurgeon, $1; Mrs. Elizabeth Mil- 
ler, $1 2 00 

Colorado— $6.00 

Western District, Individual 

Miss Edna Burkett 100 

Northeastern District, Individual 

Mrs. R. G. Wimer, 5 00 

Virginia— $6.25 

Southern District, Individual 

Mrs. T. D. Kennett, 6 00 

First District, Sunday-school 

Pleasant View 25 

Idaho— $25.00 
Individuals 

Jno. Wilsey and wife, 25 00 

Wisconsin— $2.00 

Individual 

A Sister 2 00 

Pennsylvania— $1.00 
Southern District, Individual 

Mrs. Chas. A. Fenton 100 

Maryland— $0.50 

Eastern District, Individual 

Martha S. Disney 50 

Canada— $0.15 
Individual 

L. Beanblossom, 15 

Total for the month, $ 141 38 

Previously reported, 1,295 04 

Total for' the year $ 1,436 42 

CHINA NATIVE WORKER 

Virginia — $75.00 

Northern District, Christian Workers 

Timberville 75 00 

California— $38.00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Missionary Class, Covina, 38 00 

Indiana— -$35 . 00 

Northern District, Christian Workers 

Nappanee, 35 00 

Kansas— 30.00 

Northeastern District, Sunday-school 

Onward Circle Class, Sabetha 30 00 

Illinois— $75.00 

Southern District, Individual 

J. E. Bowman 75 00 

Colorado — $15.00 

Southeastern District, Individuals 

Osee and Blanche Frantz 15 00 

Oklahoma— $15.00 
Congregation 

Washita 15 00 

Iowa— $9.20 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Greene 9 20 

Total for the month, $ 292 20 

Previously reported, 1,343 37 

Total for the year, $ 1,635 57 

PING TING HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 
BUILDING 
Virginia— $50.00 

Northern District, Aid Society 

Mt. Zion 30 00 

Congregation 

Garber, 20 00 

Pennsylvania— $50.00 

Western District, Aid Society 

Rummel 50 00 

Illinois and Wisconsin— $30.00 

Northern 111. and Wis. Aid Societies, ... 30 00 



Arizona— $7.00 

Aid Society 

Glendale, 7 00 

Washington— $10.00 
Aid Society 

Olympia 10 00 

California— $10.00 

Southern District, Aid Society 

Covina, 10 00 

Ohio— $10.00 

Northwestern District Aid Society 

Fostoria, 10 00 

Colorado— $5.00 

Northeastern District, Aid Society 

Sterling 5 00 

Total for the month, $ 172 00 

Previously reported 609 70 

Total for the year, $ 781 70 

CHINA ORPHANAGE 
Pennsylvania— $11.00 

Eastern District, Sunday-school 

Greater Missionary Class, Norristown, . . 11 00 

Illinois— $1.00 
Northern District, Individual 

Julia Ellen Porter 100 

Wisconsin— $1.00 
Individual 

A Sister, 100 

Total for the month, $ 13 00 

Previously reported, 698 64 

Total for the year, $ 711 64 

CHINA HOSPITAL 
Pennsylvania — $25.00 

Western District, Sunday-school 

Hooversville 25 00 

Oregon— $1.00 
Individual 

Emma Blankenship, , 100 

Total for the month $ 26 00 

Previously reported 658 18 

Total for the year, $ 684 18 

PING TING HOSPITAL 
Indiana— $25.00 

Northern District, Aid Society 

West Goshen, 25 00 

Virginia— $50.00 * 

Second District, Aid Society 

Summit v 50 00 

Total for the month $ 75 00 

Previously reported, 612 71 

Total for the year, , $ 687 71 

CHINA GIRLS' SCHOOL 
Kansas— $12.00 

Southwestern District, Christian Workers 
Garden City Junior, 12 00 

Total for the month, $ 12 00 

Previously reported 433 52 

Total for the year, $ 445 52 

SWEDEN BUILDING FUND 
Pennsylvania— $31.00 

Eastern District, Sunday-schools 
Harrisburg, $10; Phoebe Longenecker's 

Class, Palmyra, $16; Beginners' Class, 

Harrisburg, $5, 31 00 

Virginia— $50.00 

Eastern District, Sunday-school 
Sisters' Class, Oakton, 50 00 

Total for the month $ 8100 

Previously reported, 1.753 08 

Total for the year $ 1,834 08 



April 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



127 



SWEDEN MISSION 
Missouri — $12.50 

Middle District, Individual 
C. C. Peterson, 12 50 

Total for the month, $ 12 50 

Previously reported, 105 92 

Total for the year, $ 128 42 

DENMARK MISSION 
Kansas — $5.00 

Southeastern District, Individual 

Mrs. A. Christensen 5 00 

Missouri— $1230 

Middle District, Individual 

C. C. Peterson, 12 50 

Total for the month, $ 17 50 

Previously reported, 2141 

Total for the year, $ 38 91 

CONFERENCE OFFERING FOR JANUARY 
Virginia— $150.00 

First District, Congregation 

Daleville, 100 00 

Second District, Sunday-school 

King's Daughters Class, Beaver Creek, 
$41.50; Willing Workers, Beaver Creek, 

$8.50 5000 

Pennsylvania— $110.00 

Eastern District, Congregation 

Fredericksburg, 50 00 

Sunday-schools 

Ridgeley, $25; Mission Study Class, 

Schuylkill Cong., $25 50 00 

Southern District. Aid Society 

Mercersburg, 10 00 

Illinois— $100 JO 

Northern District, Congregation 

Mt. Morris 50 90 

Bethany Volunteer Band 50 00 

Indiana— $100.00 

Northern District, Individual 

E. F. Haynes, 100 00 

Ohio— $50.00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Men's Class, Union 50 00 

Iowa— $50.00 

Middle District, Congregation 

Prairie City 50 00 

Missouri— $50.00 

Northern District, Congregation 

Smith Fork 50 00 

Louisiana— $50.00 
Congregation 

Roanoke, 50 00 

China— $50.00 

Ping Ting Chou Congregation, 50 00 

Total for the month $ 710 90 

Previously reported, 136,446 50 

Total to date, $137,157 40 

CONFERENCE OFFERING FOR FEBRUARY 
Ohio— $140.07 

Northeastern District, Individuals 

J. S. Leckrone, $5; C. W. Stutzman, $5; 

D. M. Brubaker, $52.07 62 07 

Northwestern District, Congregations 

Toledo, $25; Lower Stillwater, $53 78 00 

Virginia— $107.50 

Northern District, Congregation 

Unity, 100 00 

Individual 

Minor C. Miller 2 50 

Southern District, Individual 

L. A. Bowman, 5 00 

Maryland— $250.00 

Middle District, Congregation 

Hagerstown 200 00 

Eastern District, Individuals 

Wm. E. Roop and wife 50 00 

Pennsylvania— $9.00 

Western District, Individuals 



Peter Knavel, $4; W. J. Hamilton, $5 9 00 

Indiana— $191.00 

Northern District, Congregations 

First South Bend, $41; Nappanee, $100, .. 141 00 
Individual 

J. O. Kessler 50 00 

Kansas — $50.00 
Southwestern District 

Mission Band, McPherson College, 50 00 

Michigan— $25.00 
Congregation 

Lake View, 25 00 

Total for the month, $ 772 57 

Previously reported, 137,157 40 

Total to date, $137,929 97 

CHINA HOSPITAL 

Pennsylvania— $50.00 

Southeastern District, Aid Society 
1st Church, Philadelphia, 50 00 

Total for the month, $ 50 00 

RELIEF AND RECONSTRUCTION 

COMMITTEE'S REPORT FOR 

FEBRUARY, 1920 

ARMENIAN AND SYRIAN RELIEF 
Alabama 

A Brother and Sister, Blountsville, $5; 

Sug. J. Petrie, $5 $ io 00 

California 

Geo. S. Wine, Fresno, $50; Tropico Ch., 
$10.50; McFarland Church, $116; A Sister 
of So. Calif., $3; A Brother, Laton, $50, .... 229 50 
Colorado 

First Grand Valley S. S., $42.37; Rocky 
Ford Church, $104.56; B. F. Stauffer, $500, 646 93 
Florida 

George K. Miller, Sebring, $50; A Sister, 

K 5400 

Idaho 

John Lind, Lenore, $100; Nannie A. Har- 
man, Shoshone, $2; John Wilsey and wife, 

Winchester, $25, 127 00 

Illinois 

Astoria Cong., $143.50; Franklin Grove 
S. S., $47.89; Cerro Gordo Cong., $5; Free- 
port Church, $11 207 39 

Indiana 

Josephine Hanna, Logansport, $5; Glean- 
ers' S. S. Class of Yellow River Church, 
$30; West Manchester Cong., $40; Wabash 
County S. S., $7; Receipt No. 4833, $11; 
Loon Creek Church, $63.69; Helpers for 
Christ S. S. Class of Maple Grove S. S., 
$10; Marie Shively, Laketon, $20; Topeka 

Cong., $26; Mexico Church, $25 231 69 

Iowa 

Sheldon Cong., $43; I. M. Forney, Water- 
loo, $5; Curlew Church, $20; Three Sisters 
of So. Keokuk Cong., $25; Eli Ulrey, Prairie 
City, $25; Greene Cong., $288.49; Council 
Bluffs S. S., $5; Kingsley Brethren S. S., 
$27.50; Mrs. Sarah Lehman, Kingsley, $100, 538 99 
Kansas 

Washington Creek Church, $7.63; West 
Wichita Church, $27.05; Fannie Stevens, 
Hepler, $2; Central Ave. Church, Kansas 
City, $100; Wichita East Side Church, $12; 

Mrs. Laura Duryle, Ellsworth, $5.15, 153 83 

Maryland 

C. C. Beachy, Accident, $50; Amanda L. 
Ausherman, Middletown, $3; Albert Baker, 
Swanton, $15; A Brother and Sister of Ful- 
ton Ave. Cong., Baltimore, $8; K. Mae 
Rowland, Hagerstown, $5; Brother and 
Sister B. Broadfording, $5; A Brother, 

Middletown, $10, % 00 

Michigan 

Thornapple S. S., $26.76; Amanda Wer- 
tenberger, South Haven, $1.75, 28 51 



128 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1920 



Minnesota 

Root River Cong., $5; W. S. Ramer and 
wife, Barnum, $25; Lewiston Cong., $61; C. 
W. Society, Worthington, $10 101 00 

Missouri 

Emma E. Wyland, Carthage, $1.24; Will- 
ing Worker Class, Wakenda S. S., $3.80,.. 5 04 

Montana 

Albert Smith, Glasgow, 15 00 

Nebraska 

So. Beatrice Cong., 295 41 

Ohio 

Katie Beath, Lyndon, $2; Hartville Ch., 
$425.75; D. W. Weisel, Hartville, $10; Can- 
ton City Church, $42; Painter Creek Cong., 
r; Painter Creek Aid Society, $25; Akron 
S„ $60.19; Akron Junior C. W. Society, 
$16; Class No. 10, Beech Grove S. S„ $10; 
Castine S. S., So. Ohio, $150; Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Toms, Bellville, $20; Mrs. T. M. Arn- 
old, West Salem, 50c; Ruth Betz, Massil- 
lon, $11; Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Schrock, 
Baltic, $15; Delilah Snider (Deceased), $5; 
G. L. Snider, Lima, $5 . 817 44 

Pennsylvania 

First Church of Philadelphia, $321.90; 
S. S. of First Church of Philadelphia, 
$10.25; Coventry Church, $91.40; Jennie 
Thomas, Hooversville, $2; Upper Conewago 
Cong., $71.56; Boiling Springs S. S., Lower 
Cumberland Cong., $16.50; Ada White, 
Burnham, $2; Mae Horner, Hooversville, 
$5; Elmer Walker, Meyersdale, $9; Snake 
Spring Church, $24; Upper Codorus Cong., 
Chestnut Grove S. S., $21.50; Johnstown 
Cong., $89; M. M. Hartman, York, $10; S. 
S. of Williamsburg, $20.15; Upper Codorus 
Cong., Chestnut Grove S. S., $15.25; Mrs. 
Anna Greenwald, Hamburg, $1; H. K. Mil- 
ler, Huntsdale, $5; Marshcreek Church, 
$60.56; East Petersburg S. S., $3; Ephrata 
S. S., $7. 73; Hatfield Church, $100; Peach 
Blossom Church, $26; Fair View S. S., 
Peach Blossom Church, $91.32; Conewago 
Church, $45.10; Mrs. W. F. Hollinger, Ab- 
bottstown, $3; Shippensburg Cong., $80; 
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. S. Thomas, Hooversville, 
$10, 1,14222 

Virginia 

Sarah J. Hylton, Monarat, $2; Daleville 
Cong., $100; Carl F. Miller, Lois, $1.50; 
Christiansburg Cong., $11.50; Fairfax Cong., 
$56.20; D. W. Strickler and wife, Luray, 
$10; Valley Cong., S. S. Collection, $30; 
Sangerville Cong., $370.11; Nelie Wampler, 

Pirkey, $5 ; Daleville Church, $20 606 31 

Washington 

George Vice, Wenatchee, $75; Sunny 
Slope S. S., Wenatchee Cong., $152.50; For- 
est Center S. S., Valley, $24.43, 251 '93 

West Virginia 

Pleasant View S. S. of Chestnut Grove 
Cong., $97.76; Mrs. S. M. Annon, Thornton, 
90c; A Sister in White Pine Cong., First 
District W. Va., $3; J. D. Beery, Augusta, 
$40 ..!..... 14166 

Total for month of February, $ 5,699 85 

SERBIAN RELIEF FUND 
Illinois 

Sterling S. S 32 00 

Total for month of February, $ 32 00 

JEWISH RELIEF FUND 
California 

A Sister of Southern Calif 3 00 

Maryland 

Collection taken at Union Service at 

College, New Windsor, 23 76 

Pennsylvania 

Maiden Creek Church, 28 04 

Total for month of February, $ 54 80 



THE PLACE OF PRAYER IN THE 

LIFE OF THE FOREIGN 

VOLUNTEER 

(Continued from Page 110) 
What is the place of prayer in the life 
of the foreign volunteer? It is his first 
duty to God, to man and to himself. God 
is pleased when we put him before every- 
thing else. God will bless the foreign mis- 
sionaries if we pray for them. By prayer 
and prayer alone will we be able to get 
spiritual power and overcome the evils in 
our lives. And we are going to pray for 
more volunteers, aren't we? Let us put 
prayer first in our lives and " pray without 
ceasing," and let the Lord work out in us 
the likeness of himself. Foreign volun- 
teers, God calls you to prayer. 
New Windsor, Md. 

MOUNTAIN MISSIONS OF THE 
SOUTH 

(Continued from Page 119) 
can it be spoken of as extensive. Yet it 
calls for men and women of peculiar fit- 
ness, big-hearted, clear-visioned, persons 
of strong sympathies, much perseverance, 
and real humility and love of Christ deeply 
implanted in their hearts. 

To those whose hearts go out in love and 
helpfulness to the ones who are not in the 
fold of Jesus, under the protection and 
guidance of the church, the Southern 
mountains offer one of the most inviting 
opportunities to be found in the home mis- 
sion field. 

McPherson College. 

The " flu " epidemic has again been rag- 
ing in and around Liao Chou. Most of the 
foreigners, however, have happily escaped 
its attack. A number in the city who did 
not avail themselves of foreign medical aid 
died of the disease. Of the many school- 
boys and others who entered the hospital, 
only one little boy died, although a number 
of others were very low and at times we 
almost despaired of their lives; but we 
thank our loving Father, who, through 
many prayers and good medical aid has 
mercifully brought them out of danger. 
The largest number of in-patients at an] 
one time during this month was twenty- 
two men and four women. 



QEINERAL MISSION BOARD 



ITS MEMBERSHIP 



D. L. MILLER, Mt. Morris, 111., Life Advis- 
ory Member. 
H. C. EARLY, Penn Laird, Va. 
J. J. YODER, McPherson, Kansas. 



CHARLES D. BONSACK, New Windsor, Md. 

General Director Forward Movement. 
OTHO WINGER, North Manchester, Ind. 
A. P. BLOUGH, Waterloo, Iowa. 



ITS ORGANIZATION 

H. C. EARLY, President. J. H. B. Williams, Secretary-Treasurer. 

OTHO WINGER, Vice-President. Editor. The Visitor. 

M. R. Zigler, Home Mission Secretary. 

All correspondence for the Board should be addressed to Elgin, Illinois 

ITS FORCE OF FOREIGN WORKERS 



DENMARK 

Villa Pax, Koldby, Pr. 

Hordum 



Ulasmire, 
Glasmire, 



W. E. 
Leah S. 



SWEDEN 

Frtisgatan No. 1, 
Malmb, Sweden 

Buckingham, Ida 

Graybill, J. F. 

Graybill, Alice M. 

CHINA 

Ping Ting Hsien, 
Shansi, China 

Bowman, Samuel B. 
Bowman, Pearl S. 
Bright, J. Homer 
Bright, Minnie F. 
Crumpacker, F. H. 
Crumpacker, Anna M. 
Flory, Edna R. 
Horning, Emma 
Metzger, Minerva 
Rider, Bessie M. 
Vaniman, Ernest D. 
Vaniman, Susie C. 
Wampler, Dr. Fred J. 
Wampler, Rebecca C. 

North China 
Language School, 
Pekin, China 

Horning, Dr. D. L. 
Horning, Martha Daggett 
Miller, Valley 
Myers, Minor M. 
Myers, Elizabeth Z. 
Shock, Laura J. 
Sollenberger, O. C. 
Sollenberger, Hazel Cop- 
pock 
Ullom, Lulu 

Liao Chou, Shansi, China 
Brubaker, Dr. O. G. 
Brubaker, Cora M. 
Cripe, Winnie E. 
Flory, Raymond C. 
Flory, Lizzie N. 
Hutchison, Anna 
Oberholtzer, I. E. 
Oberholtzer, Elizabeth W. 



Pollock, Myrtle 
Seese, Norman A. 
Seese, Anna 
Senger, Nettie M. 
Wampler, Ernest M. 
Wampler, Vida M. 

Shou Yang, Shansi, China 

Clapper, V. Grace 
Flory, Byron M. 
Flory, Nora 
Heisey, Walter J. 
Heisey, Sue R. 
Schaeffer, Mary 

On Furlough 

Blough, Anna V., 266 
Hammond Ave., Wa- 
terloo, la. 



INDIA 

Ahwa, Dangs Forest, 
via Bilimora, India 

Ebey, Adam 
Ebey, Alice K. 

Anklesvar, Broach Dist., 
India 

Arnold, S. Ira 
Arnold, Elizabeth 
Lichty, D. J. 
Miller, Eliza B. 
Mow, Anetta 
Stover, W. B. 
Stover, Mary E. 
Ziegler, Kathryn 

Bulsar, Surat Dist., India 

Blickenstaff, Verna M. 
Brown, Nettie P. 
Brumbaugh, Anna B. 
Butterbaugh, Andrew G. 
Butterbaugh, Bertha L. 
Cottrell, Dr. A. R. 
Cottrell, Dr. Laura M. 
Eby, E. H. 
Eby, Emma H. 
Hoffert, A. T. 
Hollenberg, Fred M. 
Hollenberg, Nora R. 
Kintner, Elizabeth 
Miller, A. S. B. 
Miller, Jennie B. 
Miller, Sadie J. 
Mohler, Jennie 



Replogle, Sara G. 
Ross, A. W. 
Ross, Flora N. 
Shull, Cbalmer G. 
Shull, Mary S. 
Summer, Benjamin F. 
Wagoner. T. Elmer 
Wagoner, Ellen H. 

Dahanu, Thana Dist., India 

Alley, Howard I. 
Alley, Hattie Z. 
Ebbert, Ella 
Nickey, Dr. Barbara M. 
Pittenger, J. M. 
Pittenger, Florence B. 
Royer, B. Mary 
Swartz, Goldie 

Jalalpor, Surat Dist., India 

Forney, D. L. 
Forney, Anna M. 
Grisso, Lillian 
Shumaker, Ida C. 

Vada, Thana Dist., India 

Garner, H. P. 
Garner, Kathryn B. 
Powell, Josephine 

Post: Umalla, via 
Anklesvar, India 

Himmelsbaugh, Ida 
Holsopple, Q. A. 
Holsopple, Kathren R. 

Vyara, via Surat, India 

Long, I. S. 
Long, Effie V. 

On Furlough 

Blough, J. M., Hunting 

don, Pa. 
Blough, Anna Z., Hunt 

ingdon, Pa. 
Eby, Anna M., Trotwood 

Ohio 
Emmert, Jesse B., Hunt 

ingdon, Pa. 
Emmert, Gertrude R. 

Huntingdon, Pa. 
Kaylor, John I., La Verne 

Calif. 
Widdowson, Olive, Hunt 

ingdon, Pa. 



Please Notice— Postage on letters to our missionaries is 5c for each ounce or fraction 
thereof and 3c for each additional ounce or fraction. 



pillllllHiVllllllllllllllillllllllllllM 

| "Lift Up Your Heads" 1 

I O Ye Christians I 

I Lift them high enough that you may j 

| get a world-view of a world-wide field j 

| This is what the jj 

[ Forward Movement | 

| of the Church of the Brethren 

jj Is endeavoring to bring to you. 1 

I The Master's Command to His 

| Followers is to "Go Forward. " 

| FORWARD to a deeper Spiritual life 

| FORWARD to an effectual Prayer life 

| FORWARD in every Spiritual resource 

| FORWARD in Stewardship — Stewardship 

| of life, of ability, of influence | 

| and possessions. | 

| FORWARD in Evangelism in the home 

| fields. | 

| FORWARD in the Great Fields over seas. 

| FORWARD until he says, "It is enough." 

| To this program the Forward Movement is | 
committed by the sacred vow of service. 



THE FORWARD MOVEMENT 

| Church of the Brethren 

| ELGIN ILLINOIS 

!llllllllllll!IIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 



THE MISSIONARY 




Church of the 'Brethren 



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Exhibit Building for Sedalia Conference 

Be sure to attend Conference and be sure to visit the exhibit several times. Study 
the displays and carry some new ideas to your home church. They will expect it 

of you 



li!!lllllllllllilll!l!llllllllllllllllllll!!ill^ llllllllllllllllll!ll!!!l!llllilllllllllllllllll!:!IIIIIIH!" 'llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!!' 1 '!!'^!!'!'!!!!!!!! 1, 1 



Vol. XXII 



MAY, 1920 



No. 5 






WliiiM.f 



^ SwSi^mfr v. ; 



The Missionary Visitor 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN 
THROUGH HER GENERAL MISSION BOARD 



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Contents for May, 1920 

EDITORIALS, 130 

ESSAYS— 

j A Tithing Testimony, By W. I. Buckingham 132 

j How Can Pastors and Other Leaders Help Young People to Find 

Their Life-work? By J. Campbell White, 133 

What May Reasonably Be Expected of a Pastor in the Way of Mis- 
$ sionary Leadership in His Own Church. By Rev. Rockwell Har- 
mon Potter, D. D., 135 

Preparation for Service, By W. L. Slifer, 136 

1A Meeting in the Jungle, By B. Mary Royer, 137 
The Awaking, By Anna Flory, 140 

i China Notes for January and February, By Anna M. Hutchison 142 
India Notes for February, By Anetta C. Mow 146 
Encouragement for Parents, By A Brother, 147 

« What if the 60,000,000 Reachables of India Become Mohammedan! By 

| J. ] . Kaylor, 148 

What if These 60,000,000 Become Christians? By Anetta C. Mow. ...153 

s 

j THE WORKERS' CORNER, 150 

| FINANCIAL REPORT, 156 

] 



Volume XXII MAY, 1920 No. 5 



The Life Work Conference at Sedalia 

Our young people who were present at Winona Lake last year — and 
the older ones too — in those never-to-be-forgotten days of the Life Work 
Conference, will feel a particular thrill of joy over the announcement that 
there is to be another such Conference at Sedalia this year on Thursday 
and Friday, June 10-11. These days will offer a very strong program, 
which will combine the features of a Life Work Conference, a Bible 
Institute and a Program of Evangelism. There will be three periods in the 
sessions of the forenoon and afternoon and two in the evening. 

Such a Conference will afford inspiration for the young, giving trend 
and shape to their life purposes, will supply instruction for all in the Great 
Book of Life, and will set the altar fires burning in the hearts of those 
present for a great Campaign of Evangelism which it is proposed shall 
sweep the Church of the Brethren, beginning with September 1, 1920, and 
ending with August 31, 1921. 

We sincerely trust that those who contemplate coming to Annual 
Conference will not fail to make note of these days. DO NOT WAIT 
UNTIL SATURDAY TO COME TO SEDALIA. Come on Wednesday, 
the same as do the brethren of the Standing Committee. We shall miss 
our guess if these are not some of the greatest days of the whole gathering. 
They were last year; they will be again this year. In these days of the 
great Forward Movement, which will quicken the interest in every righteous 
endeavor of the whole church, it is absolutely imperative that we meet, not 
only to pray and plan, but also to receive the Pentecostal blessings which 
are sure to follow united endeavor. As we learn to associate together in 
inspirational meetings at our Conference, so shall we learn to love one 
another more. Thursday and Friday are destined to become the great in- 
spirational days for the young people of the entire Conference. But the 
older brethren and sisters are urged to be present. 

The grounds at Sedalia are wonderful and ample this year; we have 
never had better buildings. The committee of arrangements is making every 
effort to provide for your every, want. The program will be abundantly 
worth your while. The future plans of the Forward Movement need your 
presence at Sedalia, and you simply can not afford to miss the Life Work- 
Bible Institute-Evangelistic Program of Thursday and Friday, June 10-11. 
We shall hope to meet you there. 

COME TO SEDALIA 



130 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1920 



EDITORIALS 



A few weeks ago it was the privilege of 
the Visitor editor to visit Sedalia and to see 
the place where the Annual Conference is 
to convene next month; and we are glad 
that we went. Somehow it had trickled in 
upon us, after such a meeting as was held 
last year, that maybe this one would not 
be so good. Not that the term " Missouri " 
sounds so different from " Indiana," but 
just because we felt that way. 

But we were very quickly converted to 
the thought that it will be possible to have 
even a better Conference this year than 
last. In the first place, the church has 
grown wonderfully during the past year 
in inspiration and enthusiasm. The needs 
of the world have gripped her; she is be- 
ginning to feel their mighty impact. This 
thought and fact alone is sufficient to set 
a psychological background, such as we did 
not have so fully developed at Winona 
Lake. 



And the consciousness, too, that Jesus 
Christ is the only Hope of the world is 
gaining tremendous weight within us. We 
had thought that the terrible war, when 
won, would bring some semblance of 
peace to a distracted billion and a half 
people; but the end of the great war has 
loosened twenty little ones, and has un- 
settled mankind's life to a most alarming 
extent. Not by might, nor by power, but 
by the Spirit of Jesus Christ, the Lamb of 
God, can peace and contentment reign 
throughout the world. This sets us towards 
our Conference to work out anew our 
future in the light of swiftly-moving 
events. This is a consciousness which will 
irresistibly draw us towards Sedalia. 

Then, too, the committee of arrange- 
ments has sought to prepare a program 
that will meet the demands of the present 
moment, and seek to interpret those de- 
mands in terms of possible activity in be- 
half of God. This will be a Conference 
with the Forward Look. Coming as it 
will after the greatest outpouring of gifts 
that the church has ever seen in behalf of 
the kingdom of God, folks will come to- 



gether to see what further service he de- 
mands. For it is a fact that the great 
majority of us, after all, find Jesus Christ 
through the gateway of philanthropy and 
service. 



Now we could have figured out all of 
these reasons why this Conference would 
be a wonderful one, and remained at our 
desk all the time, just at the same place 
where this is being written; but the in- 
spiration of seeing the commodious 
grounds at Sedalia, with their blue-grass 
sod, kept like a park; and the buildings so 
large and ample and splendidly arranged; 
and the exhibit rooms that are large and 
roomy, already filled with booths for dis- 
plays of our work; and the large Women's 
Building, situated most conveniently, the 
like of which we have never had — all of these 
things, which go to make up the physical 
necessities and niceties for a great Con- 
ference, plus the energy and fertility of 
resources of a good committee — convinced 
us and give us the conviction that the 
Sedalia Annual Conference is destined to 
be great — simply wonderful. 



Add to these things the fact that the 
Lord is leading us into a program of 
spiritual experiences, and we simply can 
not help but feel that he wants this meeting 
to prove an overflowing blessing to the 
Church of the Brethren. 

We can not know what a great place 
the Annual Conference of the Church of 
the Brethren plays in our church life. • 
Through it we are all made neighbors. We 
become well acquainted with the residents 
of Washington and Florida and Southern 
California; we meet our missionaries face 
to face; we sit down and talk things over; 
and we learn to love one another through 
it all. We pity the denomination that has 
no General Annual Conference; it is the 
life of our own Christian democracy. Come 
to Sedalia and make it the kind of a Con- 
ference that you would like to have it be. 

Are there no inconveniences at Sedalia, 
do you ask, after reading what we have 



May 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



131 



said heretofore? Certainly there are in- 
conveniences; there always are at Con- 
ference; most folks have them at home. 
We are not encouraging you to come there 
to investigate Sedalia's inconveniences. 
We are encouraging you to come there with 
your best smile and with a settled pur- 
pose to make this the greatest meeting of 
your whole life. And if twenty thousand 
come with that purpose, twenty thousand 
will go away with that testimony. Sedalia 
is used to handling large crowds and you 
can depend upon it that she will have " her 
best foot forward " to make you feel at 
home, right in the very heart of hospitable 
old Missouri. 



We say all this because we are in a 
Forward Movement, and as we view the 
situation the Forward Movement at this 
time can give you a mighty inspiration and 
vision of service for the kingdom; likewise, 
you can give it the tremendous impact of 
your presence and hearty support. 



The General Boards of the Church of 
the Brethren met in Elgin the other day 
(April 15) and discussed those interests of 
the church which they hold in common 
trust. The central theme of their discus- 
sion, of course, was the Forward Move- 
ment; and one would gather from the in- 
tensity of those eight hours spent together 
that this Movement was about the biggest 
proposition they have on their hands. 

It is big because the whole church is at 
it. The reports of the Movement that 
have come to the office show that the 
church is well-nigh unanimous in its sup- 
port, and that all of the churches are 
awakening to its purpose and rallying to 
its cause. Such a spontaneous uprising of 
the churches naturally brings problems and 
questions to the Joint Meeting. 



It is big, because the issues at stake are 
so vital. There is the cause of Religious 
Education — that which is committed to 
the Sunday School and Christian Workers' 
Boards — the cause of Christian Education 
in which is wrapped up so much of the 
success of the church of tomorrow, the 
cause of the Great Commission in home 



and foreign missions and the cause of the 
aged and the incapacitated workers in the 
Master's vineyard. The necessity for 
making adequate provision for all of these 
renders the problem of laying campaign 
plans most perplexing and exacting. 



Then, too, the problem confronting the 
Joint Boards in caring for such a Forward 
Movement is big because they desire to 
give ample consideration to all of the ideas 
and suggestions of everybody who is 
laboring in the cause, and to make the 
Movement trend towards the accomplish- 
ment of the highest good not only for to- 
day, but for tomorrow and eternity. Have 
you ever stopped to pray for the success 
of the Movement (oh, we know you have)? 
and have you also included those upon 
whom the responsibility rests for promot- 
ing this cause? Try doing it, and note the 
healthy reaction which comes into your 
interest in the success of the Movement. 

Darkest America 

According to Interchurch estimates, two- 
thirds of the population of the United 
States are without a regular, reasonable 
opportunity of attending church every 
Sunday. Absentee pastors, inadequate 
church accommodations, and great un- 
churched areas, are among the contribut- 
ing causes. -<-^f 

American Education 

Of the total Interchurch budget of $336,- 
777,572, nearly $80,000,000 is needed for the 
development of American education sc 
that the colleges and schools under denom- 
inational control may develop an adequate 
supply of leaders to fill the empty pulpits 
or to take up church work in some other 
of the 100,000 empty places for which the 
denominations participating in the Inter- 
church Movement desire to find Christian 
men and women with special training. 

The Mexican in the United States 

The Mexican problem is not at all the 
other side of the border. The Interchurch 
surveys have revealed that there are no 
less than a million Mexican-Americans in 
the United States today, 600,000 of them in 
the Southwest. These Mexicans, living in 



132 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1920 



wretched poverty, present an almost un- 
touched home mission field. 



Negroes in American Cities 

Need for religious work among the col- 
ored population of our large cities is dem- 
onstrated by the Interchurch Home Mis- 
sion Survey which has revealed that church 
membership among the Negroes, while 
common in rural districts, almost invari- 



' ably falls off when the Negroes migrate 
to cities. New York City, which has one 
of the largest Negro colonies in the world, 
has only 28,000 Negro church members out 
of a total Negro population of 145,000. 

Correction 

The picture entitled Bethany Volunteers 
on page 101 of the April Visitor should be 
called Manchester Volunteers. 



A Tithing Testimony 



W. I. Buckingham 



General Mission Board, Elgin, 111.: 

I send this in answer to your request, 
for testimonies on tithing. 

About forty years ago I heard Eld. David 
Frantz, of Oakley, 111., preach a stirring 
sermon on tithing, or rather put stress on 
laying by in store as God has prospered 
one (1 Cor. 16: 2). He dwelt on having 
system in giving, or in religious affairs, as 
well as in secular matters. 

I was a boy in the teens and his mes- 
sage touched my heart. I went home and 
got a little box, which I called the Lord's 
treasure, and put it in my trunk. When- 
ever I got a dime, a penny went into the 
Lord's box. If I got a dollar, a dime went 
in. I did not even tell my parents or any 
one else about the missionary box, until 
I began to preach missionary sermons. 

The little missionary box was one of the 
joys of my life, and even now I look back 
to it with pleasure. There were not so 
many calls in those days as now, but I 
always had a few dimes in the box when 
there was a worthy call. It was a pleasure 
to give that which was especially set apart 
for God. I always felt that the Lord 
prospered me. I have faith in the scripture 
which says: "Bring ye all the tithes into 
the storehouse, that there may be meat in 
mine house, and prove me now herewith, 
saith the Lord of hosts, if I will not open 
you the windows of heaven, and pour you 
out a blessing, that there shall not be room 
enough to receive it" (Mai. 3: 10). I 
believe the Lord would prosper some peo- 
ple more if they would give him more — 
if they would only trust or prove him. 



The little missionary box was not only a 
help to me spiritually, but it often helped 
me in a financial way. I often would 
borrow from it, but did not rob it. I al- 
ways put the money back with interest. It 
was the best bank I ever borrowed from. 
I am afraid if I had not commenced giving 
in a systematic way I sometimes would 
have robbed the Lord in tithes and offer- 
ings, for I was inclined to be a little 
stingy if I did not guard against it. It was 
a safeguard. 

Many can not stand prosperity. The 
more we get the more we want. It is 
like drinking salt water: the more one 
drinks the more thirsty one becomes. 

Bro. Frantz's sermon started me in the 
right channel, and when I got married my 
good wife was a great help to me. She 
always saved — would even deny herself 
of comforts, that she might have something 
to give to those in need. She was never 
happier than when doing service for 
others. Her whole life has been one of 
service to others. Her mother died when 
she was eighteen, leaving eight children, 
the baby only three months old. She 
kept house six years for her father. 
One of the other girls was now old enough 
to keep house, and I took her from them. 
In three years after we were married her 
father died and the youngest three children 
came from Pennsylvania to Illinois and 
made their home with us. 

Prosperity has been our lot, and our 
prayer is that we may use the mammon 
which the Lord has given, us, so he can 
trust us with the true riches. We have 



May 

1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



133 



kept no book account of what we have 
given, but I can call to mind more than ten 
thousand dollars given to schools, churches, 
missions, old folks' home dispensaries, 
etc. 

Our conscience would not let us stop 
with the tenth now. With the great need 
under the glorious gospel dispensation the 
Lord surely expects as much of us as of 
the Jew. Even the Jew did not stop with 
the tenth; that was the law, or tax. The 
Jew had two treasure chests: one for the 
tithes and one for the free-will offering. 
He felt he hadn't really given anything 
until he gave a free-will offering. 

About two weeks before I was called to 
the ministry I had a dream. I was a 
deacon at that time. I dreamed that in 
our official council, Bro. Arnold, our elder, 
said that the ministerial board was calling 
for more help in the ministry. In my 
dream the lot fell upon myself, and I was 



before the congregation trying to preach 
my first sermon. My subject was covet- 
ousness. I stuttered around awhile — 
couldn't say much — and sat down. Then 
I awoke and could not sleep. I could not 
get away from my dream. I never believed 
in dreams, but I have always felt that that 
was more than an ordinary dream, for the 
next time we met in official council, Bro. 
Arnold came over the very words I 
dreamed, word for word, and I was chosen 
to the ministry at that election. Now I 
am not afraid or ashamed to tell what the 
Bible says about covetousness, for it is 
one of the blackest and most deceptive of 
sins. 

If there is any sermon I enjoy it is a 
missionary sermon, and I appreciate that 
dream, for I was making some money and 
needed the warning. 

Hampton, Iowa, March 11. 



How Can Pastors and Other Leaders Help Young People 
to Find Their Life- Work ? 

J. Campbell White 



1. By making clear to them that God has 
a perfect plan for every life. Many young 
people grow to maturity without realizing 
this. Is it any wonder that there are so 
many misfits and failures and so much un- 
happiness in view of the spirit and method 
in which many life-plans are made? 

2. By remembering that all young people 
need help in this realm. Not only those 
who are to give their lives to Christian 
work, but also those who are to go into 
business or professional life need guidance. 
There is no other matter in which young 
people generally are more deeply interested 
than in finding their life-work. Approach- 
ing them from this vantage-point of in- 
terest, many other helpful influences can be 
brought to bear upon them. They can also 
be led in this most natural way to an un- 
derstanding . of many of the deepest facts 
and principles of life. Can anything be 
more important than helping young people 
to find what they can do best and can do 
with largest measure of personal develop- 
ment and happiness? Surely all of this is 
in the will of God for every life. 



3. By recalling the fact that life-choices 
are often made at a very early age. Though 
not then made known, very many of them 
are arrived at between twelve and eighteen 
years of age. This emphasizes the great im- 
portance of bringing proper influences to 
bear upon young people during this period, 
as well as throughout the later years of 
preparation. 

4. By providing adequate public and pri- 
vate instruction in the fundamental prin- 
ciples underlying all right choices in life, 
and by making very clear and emphatic the 
spiritual conditions under which God's 
guidance may be expected and secured. 
This instruction should include an oc- 
casional series of sermons, systematic in- 
struction in the Sunday-school, periodic dis- 
cussion in Young People's Societies and 
Mission Study Classes, the circulation of 
carefully selected literature among young 
people and a vast amount of personal con- 
ference with individuals. 

5. By arranging for systematic, compre- 
hensive and thorough processes of education 
upon the total task of the church in this 



134 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1920 



world of need. These should show the won- 
derful opportunity for the Christian solution 
to be applied to all problems in our own 
land and among all the nations of the world, 
and also the way God uses individuals in ex- 
panding his kingdom. 

6. By persuading many bright boys and 
girls to go forward with their education in a 
college with a healthy and vigorous Chris- 
tian atmosphere. This is one of the greatest 
services that can be rendered both to the 
young people themselves and to the king- 
dom of Christ. One of the chief aims of 
Christian colleges is to train an adequate 
supply of leaders for all kinds of Christian 
callings. 

7. By placing definite responsibility upon 
some carefully selected individuals in each 
congregation, who will give special and sus- 
tained attention to this matter of helping 
young people to find God's plan and will for 
their life-work. These individuals should 
then be brought together occasionally in 
District Conferences to share their best ex- 
periences with others and thus multiply the 
number of recruiting specialists and voca- 
tional counselors. The Interchurch World 



Movement will arrange for such con- 
ferences. 

8. By following up carefullly those who 
show special interest. This may be done 
with suitable literature, Bible Classes, Per- 
sonal Workers Groups, Mission Study 
Classes, and other forms of Christian edu- 
cation and activity, so that the interest that 
is once awakened may be fed and de- 
veloped. Most of this follow-up work can 
be done only by local leadership, either by 
the pastor or others working closely with 
him in these matters. 

9. By practicing the habit of prayer for 
laborers to be thrust out into the harvest 
fields, and by laying this burden of prayer 
upon others. 

10. By making plain to parents the folly 
and sin of interfering with Cxod s plan being 
realized in the lives of their chldren. 

11. By promoting vital religious faith and 
life in the homes of the people. This may 
be done in such a way that, from childhood, 
the young people shall be living in an at- 
mosphere which breathes the habitual 
prayer: "Thy kingdom come; thy will be 
done on earth as it is in heaven." 




Representatives of the United Student Volunteers of the Church of the Brethren, Attending the 
Becker Bicentennial Life Work Conference, Winona Lake, Indiana 

Remember the Life Work Conference at Sedalia this year is to be still better. It begins the 

evening of June 9 



May 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



135 



What May Reasonably Be Expected of a Pastor 

in the Way of Missionary Leadership 

in His Own Church? 

Rev. Rockwell Harmon Potter, D. D., Hartford, Conn. 



THE one thing which the pastor must 
give in the way of missionary lead- 
ership in his own church is inspi- 
rational information; that is, the pastor 
must show to his people that the mission- 
ary impulse and the missionary enterprise 
grow out of the heart of the Gospel. He 
must so preach the Gospel that every man 
who hears him shall recognize the outreach 
of Christian service as an essential part of 
that message; he must so preach the Gospel 
that every man who hears him shall recog- 
nize the missionary enterprise as vitally re- 
lated both to the local church and its par- 
ish and to the church of the world and its 
task. 

The pastor will do this most effectively 
not by occasional sermons on missions, 
though such sermons will have their place 
in his plan and program. He will do this 
most effectively by relating his sermons 
continuously and constantly to this great 
enterprise of the Christian people of our 
own time. Not that every sermon must 
have in it reference to the mission field, but 
that every sermon must have in it the spirit 
of the mission fields and that frequent ser- 
mons will have in them explicit reference 
to the mission enterprise as showing prac- 
tically the working of the gospel spirit in 
the world. 

The pastor may reasonably be expected 
to do his part in the organization and edu- 
cation of the church which he serves for its 
part in the missionary enterprise. Just 
how much his share is will depend upon the 
resources available in the membership of 
the church. It is safe to say he never ought 
to do any part of this work for which a 
member of the church can be secured. It 
will be his privilege to be in counsel with 
all missionary committees, and to encour- 
age them in the making of their plans; in 
many instances it may be necessary for him 
to teach mission-study classes and to take 
leadership in plans for securing the gifts 
of the people. If there is no one else to do 



this, then he must do it; but his best way 
of doing it always is to secure somebody 
else to do it. 

If the minister is awake and alive to the 
riches of the Gospel on the one hand, and 
to the world's need on the other hand, he 
will be a means of the communication to 
his people of the impulse to serve and of 
the opportunity for service. He will be loy- 
al to the accredited agencies of his own 
Christian fellowship, and he will be alert 
for new opportunities of service which are 
born out of new needs. He will be careful 
that his own energies and those of his peo- 
ple be not so widely diffused as to be with- 
out effect anywhere, and he will be careful 
also lest the work of missions become so 
stereotyped and formal as to lose its appeal 
to the enthusiasm of the Christian heart. 

For the pastor who is thus related to the 
Gospel and to the world the distinctions be- 
tween the various mission fields will dis- 
appear. The Christian care for the children 
of his own church, the effort to reach the 
indifferent of his own community, the de- 
velopment of rescue and remedial and re- 
form agencies in his own town, the plant- 
ing of the church and the sustaining of 
relief and reform institutions throughout 
his own State and country and the sending 
of preachers and teachers and helpers to 
far-off peoples that the church may be 
planted among them and that it may there 
bear its proper fruitage in the things of 
the kingdom of God— all these will be felt 
by him to be one enterprise, will be shown 
by him to his people as one mighty task. 
He will inspire each one of his people to 
desire to fulfil his part in this great work, 
and it will be his joy to show to each one 
how whatever he does for one part of the 
task has its value for all, how each one 
who honestly seeks it may find his own part 
in God's great plan and fulfilling his own 
task there may have a share by faith in the 
great consummation. — Missionary Ammuni- 
tion. 



136 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 

1920 



Preparation for Service 



W. L. 

THERE are great inducements in the 
world today to lead young Chris- 
tians toward preparation for service. 
As in every period of reconstruction, there 
is a great demand for Christian service, so 
that the world may be put upon a firm 
foundation to launch into -this new age 
wherein are golden prospects. The Church 
of the Brethren has taken upon her shoul- 
ders a full share of the task. 

The " Forward Movement " marks the 
transition from our noble history of ex- 
pansion to a period of aggressive construc- 
tion. We are changing from the period of 
"Do not" to the period of "Do." Our 
faithful elders are no longer " holding their 
congregations down"; but they are now 
catching the spirit of the " Forward Move- 
ment." All this means that the young peo- 
ple of the church have unprecedented op- 
portunities, hence unparalleled responsibil- 
ities. The young Christian is urged to pre- 
pare for the ministry, for the mission field, 
or for the home church and Sunday-school 
work. It naturally follows that preparation 
is prerequisite. 

Three questions are fundamental and 
worthy of discussion. These are, What 
kind of preparation, where shall it be ob- 
tained, and how shall it be used? The 
Christian naturally will go to the Bible to 
seek answers. " For these things are writ- 
ten as an ensample to us." Joshua* 1: 5-9 
tells us that there always is need of young 
men filled with the Spirit, strengthened in 
abiding faith, made strong by courage, blest 
with obedience, rich in the Word. All prep- 
aration should contribute toward the high 
ideal set by Joshua. It matters little 
what course we. master in college, just so 
it be mastered to glorify God and to fur- 
ther his kingdom. Our colleges can do 
no better than to meet the requirements of 
the " Forward Movement." They should 
aim to graduate ministers and missionaries 
of strong faith in the Lord. Secular edu- 
cation should be a side issue and only for 
the fuller preparation. Each and every de- 
partment ought to be so conducted that 
students, in pursuing their respective cours- 



Slifer 

es, should get a vision of the Christian mis- 
sion. 

As to the second question we have al- 
ready established that the preparation 
should be obtained in college; but we 
should remember that colleges and univer- 
sities hold no monopoly on thought. Some 
of the strongest men in our Brotherhood 
have never been to college. The words 
" preparation " and " education " are, how- 
ever, almost synonymous terms today, be- 
cause of the efficiency, economy of time 
and money, and the thoroughness of our 
educational institutions in preparation for 
service. We are simply doing as Jesus did 
when we go to college. Jesus during his 
adolescent period waxed strong and grew 
in truth and in spirit. We have record that 
Jesus was a thorough Student in the syn- 
agogues, which were similar to our own 
colleges. Wherever we are we can work 
to become efficient in the Master's service. 

After having received our preparation the 
last question comes, How shall we use it? 
Of course we will have divers temptations 
to work for fame and personal distinction, 
but a man prepared as Joshua advocates 
must have the spirit of Isaiah — " Here, 
Lord, send me." It is a good thing to 
have a special aim while in the process of 
preparation, but we should wholly surrender 
ourselves to him to go whithersoever there 
is work to be done. We should be humble 
in service and give the people food upon 
which they can grow. After preparation 
we cannot u^e the knowledge we have 
learned in books; but the preparation 
should have trained our minds so that ev- 
ery situation can be met successfully upon 
study. The student's books should be as 
the grain taken to the mill, and his teach- 
ing should be the delicious cake ready for 
use in the Master's name. In all service 
there should be a great desire to do good 
and be upright and sincere, with steadfast- 
ness. Then at that great day we can enter 
into the joys of eternal life and be forever 
blest where all is bliss, and we can praise 
his name in unison with the saints in all I 
time to come. 



May 

1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



137 



A Meeting in the Jungle 



B. Mary Royer 



IT was the first meeting of the Second 
District (Marathi) of India, held at 
Ahwa, in the Dangs Forest, Jan. 28, 
29, 30. 

A number of us lived through a year 
of anticipation of this first Marathi District 
Meeting. The fact that it was to be held 
at our jungle station, twenty-three miles 
from the railroad, added to the interest 
of the event. Vada is farther from the 
railroad than Ahwa; but Vada knows 
nothing of bad roads and thick jungle, as 
does Ahwa. 

On Monday morning a party of six mis- 
sionaries, the three Pittenger children and 
seventeen Indian Christians, met at Bili- 
mora. Here the narrow gauge train was 
boarded for Kala Amba. This is the ter- 
minus of the railway that was built within 
the past five years, and since then the dis- 
tance from Ahwa to the nearest railway 
station is twenty-three miles instead of 
forty-eight. 

We arrived at Kala Amba at 1 o'clock 
in the afternoon of the same day. Nine 
carts and one tonga, all bullock convey- 
ances, were there to meet us. One of the 



Christian teachers from Ahwa had come 
also to pilot us through the jungle. It re- 
quired more than an hour to load the carts 
and get started on our journey to Ahwa. 

Because of bad roads and the absence 
of rapid transit, the distance from Kala 
Amba to Ahwa can not be traveled in a 
day. The English have dotted this coun- 
try with government bungalows, for the 
comfort and convenience of officials when 
on tour. Missionaries, also, may use these 
bungalows when not occupied by officials. 
Our party stopped at one of these for 
the night, in a village called Pimpri, thir- 
teen miles from the railway. 

Before leaving Kala Amba the cartmen 
told us that within the past six months 
seventeen persons had been eaten by tigers. 
Several of them met their fate quite recent- 
ly. So it was requested that all carts keep 
together all the journey. Bro. Pittenger 
has made the trip to the Dangs oftener 
than he can remember and knows every 
mile of the way. Hunting being a favorite 
diversion of his, he usually takes his gun 
with him on these expeditions. While he 
was not looking for tigers this time, he 




A South India Carriage 



138 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 

1920 



did shoot an alligator and a wild hog on the 
first part of the trip. The hog escaped and 
it was too late in the day for our party to 
pursue it, but we learned Jhat the villagers 
near by had a feast the next day. 

Night came on before we reached our 
destination. The last few miles were 
traveled by lantern light, through rather 
a thick jungle and over a stretch of bad 
road. We arrived at the bungalow at 
Pimpri at 8:45 and found it occupied by 
the diwan, the chief magistrate (Indian) 
of the Dangs. He was out tiger-hunting 
and stopped there for the night. When 
he learned of the arrival of our party he at 
once left his bed, and taking shelter else- 
where on the compound, gave us the bunga- 
low. 

In a country where there are no restau- 
rants or hotels along the way, one must 
carry his bed and bedding, food and cook- 
ing vessels. Immediately after arriving at 
Pimpri the cartmen brought water from 
the river and gathered firewood for us. 
Some of us prepared the meal, while others 
were busy setting up camp cots and getting 
them ready for the night. By 10 o'clock 
our meal was ready and by 11 all was quiet, 
save the tinkling of a few bullock bells and 
the low voices of the drivers. 

At 5 the next morning Bro. Garner 
wakened the party, and soon there were 
fires burning here and there on the com- 
pound. Three stones, a few sticks of wood 
and a cooking vessel were sufficient equip- 
ment for getting our morning tea. Again 
we rolled up our bedding and folded our 







Waiting for the Passenger 



cots and by 7 o'clock we were on our way 
to Ahwa, ten miles distant. This is the 
most difficult part of the way, because of 
hills and rocks, but by noon we were in 
sight of Ahwa. 

At the outskirts of the village we were 
met by a. number of the boarding-school 
boys and Dangs Christians. They had 
come with their drums, tambourines and 
other musical instruments, to escort us to 
the mission bungalow. The village black- 
smith, who is a Christian, also was in the 
party, with his gun, and at repeated inter- 
vals fired a shot in honor of the occasion. 
So with music and gun shots, we entered 
Ahwa in state; in bullock carts, of course, 
but the spirit of hospitality that was mani- 
fest I shall not attempt to describe. The 
hearty salaams to "Mama and Papa" 
(Brother and Sister Pittenger) spoke loudly 
of the high esteem in which they are held 
by those simple-hearted people of the for- 
est. A number of incidents that happened 
during the meeting told more, of their 
faithful service in the Dangs, than could 
ever be told on paper. 

The first meeting was a prayer service 
on Tuesday evening. On Wednesday 
morning the Sunday-school and educational 
meetings were held. In the afternoon there 
was a temperance meeting, and in the eve- 
ning a song service. The latter was in 
charge of the Ahwa boys'-school teacher. 
Our Indian boarding-school children know 
how to sing, and they do it with the spirit 
if not always with the understanding. On 
Thursday morning there was a women's 
meeting, at which 
Sister Ebey presid- 
ed. Sister Pittenger 
gave a good mes- 
sage on the first 
part of Matt. 5, 
basing her remarks 
chiefly on verses 
13-16, inclusive. Sev- 
eral of our Indian 
sisters spoke on 
such topics as " Op- 
portunities for 
Service in the Non- 
Christian Village," 
"The Influence of 
the Christian Home 




May 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



139 



in the Community," "What Opportunities 
Do the Children Have for Service in School 
and in Their Villages ? " The missionaries 
present were much encouraged by the 
messages given by the Indian women. 

The District Meeting was on Thursday 
afternoon. Bro. Pittenger was moderator, 
Bro. Alley, English secretary, and Bro. 
Satwik Randive, Marathi secretary. Most 
of the business was the appointment of 
committees. A Home Mission Board also 
was elected. It is hoped that in the near 
future we may have a mission point sup- 
ported entirely by the District. The offer- 
ing was Rs. 603, which was far beyond our 
expectations. There are two hundred 
members in the District. Ahwa has the 
largest number of indigenous Christians. 
All are poor, but they gave liberally toward 
the expense of the meeting and to the 
offering. Those who could give no cash 
gave grain. Those who have carts and 
bullocks gave them free to meet the people 
at the railroad. 

On Thursday evening the boarding- 
school teacher, assisted by three of the 
boys, gave a Kirtan. This is a story in 
song. They gave the story of Job. The 
most interesting thing about a Kirtan 
is that the composition of both words 
and music is usually original. Several of 



our teachers seem to have special talent 
along this line. 

On Friday morning Bro. Ebey spoke on 
the outlook for our new Marathi District. 
I'm sure each missionary and Indian 
worker present has a larger vision of the 
possibilities of our new District and re- 
newed inspiration to press forward in the 
work that is so near to our hearts. 

On Friday noon, after prayer for a safe 
journey, farewells were said and we turned 
our faces homeward. The government 
bungalow at Pimpri was again our stopping 
place for the night. On Saturday morning 
we arose at 4 o'clock. To arise at 4 A. M., 
to meet a 3 P. M. train, thirteen miles away, 
must be unthinkable to our home folks, 
who are truly living in an automobile age. 
But the auto is not so common in the rural 
districts of India as in America. Had we 
missed our train at Kala Amba it would 
have meant a wait of twenty-four hours 
till the next one. 

We arrived at the station in time to 
cook a meal before the train left, and at 
2-: 45 we were on our way to Bilimora. 
The Dahanu party reached home on Sun- 
day morning at 1:38, somewhat tired but 
glad to be missionaries. 

Dahanu, Thana District, India. 



Clear the Way 



Men of thought! be up and stirring, 

Night and day ; 
Sow the seed — withdraw the curtain — 

Clear the way! 
Men of action, aid and cheer them, 

As ye may. 
There's a fount about to stream, 
There's a light about to beam, 
There's a warmth about to glow, 
There's a flower about to blow; 
There's a midnight darkness changing 

Into gray; 
Men of thought and men of action, 

Clear the way ! 

Once the welcome light has broken, 

Who can say 
What the unimagined glories 

Of the day? 
What the evil that shall perish 

In its ray? 
Aid the dawning tongue and pen; 



Aid it, hopes of honest men; 
Aid it, paper— aid it, type — 
Aid it, for the hour is ripe, 
Ardor earnest must not slacken 

Into play. 
Men of thought and men of action, 

Clear the way! 

Lo! a cloud's about to vanish 

From the day; 
And a brazen wrong to crumble 

Into clay. 
Lo! the right's about to conquer, 

Clear the way ! 
With the Right shall many more 
Enter, smiling, at the door ; 
With the giant W r rong shall fall 
Many others, great and small, 
That for ages long have held us 

For their prey. 
Men of thought and men of action, 

Clear the way! 

—Charles Mackay. 



140 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1920 



The Awakening 



Anna Flory, '2 1 



ONE cold, dismal evening in Decem- 
ber in the luxuriously furnished li- 
brary of his beautiful home on Jack- 
son Boulevard, Chicago, Judge Henry 
Worth sat reading. The door opened and 
a girl of twenty-two entered. She was tall 
and slender, with golden hair, clear, bright 
blue eyes, and a lovely complexion. She 
crossed the room and leaned over the back 
of his easy chair. 

" Father," she said softly. 

" What is it, daughter? " he asked, look- 
ing up affectionately. 

" You know I mentioned the returned 
missionary from Africa whom I heard lec- 
ture when I visited Mabel Horton. I would 
like to volunteer as a foreign missionary. 
You do not object, do you?" she said 
anxiously. 

His brow clouded, and he answered in a 
very annoyed tone, "Object! Yes, I ob- 
ject to my only child throwing her life 
away among savages who would kill her 
as if she were a dog." 

" O father, they are not savages; they are 
people just like we are, only waiting to be 
taught by us." 

He arose and exclaimed angrily, " You 
call your father a savage?" 

" No! no! I did not mean that, but we — " 
she began pleadingly. 

"Stop! Do not let me hear anything 
about that missionary notion of yours 
again," and with that he left the room. 

Helen Worth seated herself in the easy 
chair which her father had just left and 
covered her face with her hands. She had 
hoped her father would approve of and 
help her in what she now felt herself called 
to obey. She felt deeply hurt and disap- 
pointed at his words. Several weeks be- 
fore she had returned from New York, 
where she visited Mabel Horton, whom 
she had met at college and learned to love 
very much. Mabel had volunteered as a 
missionary before she and Helen finished 
college in June of that year. Helen often 
laughingly told ( her that she would get 
afraid and really never go. Mabel was 
anxious that Helen would become interest- 



ed, for during their friendship she had 
learned to know her and to admire her 
strength of character and willingness to 
help others, though she never considered 
missions. During Helen's stay at Mabel's 
a noted missionary from Africa lectured at 
the church where Mabel attended. The 
needs of the heathen world were pictured 
so vividly that Helen became deeply im- 
pressed. On their way home Helen said, 
" Mabel, I think I understand now why you 
are so interested in missions." 

Mabel's heart filled with joy as she an- 
swered softly, " I am so glad you do." The 
rest of their drive home that night was si- 
lent. 

The next day was Thanksgiving, and 
Mabel's brother, Robert, who was in a the- 
ological school in New York, was coming 
home to spend several weeks. Helen had 
often heard her friend speak of her brother, 
but she had never met him. 

Robert Horton was a handsome, intel- 
ligent-looking young man, with a clear, 
open countenance that portrayed his strong 
personality. He, too, was a volunteer. 

Helen enjoyed the remaining week of her 
stay with her friend, and went home feel- 
ing glad that she had been made to see the 
great needs of the world to which she now 
felt she was called. She was also glad 
when Robert asked her to write to him, 
for she had learned to admire him very 
much. 

On arriving at her home she told her 
mother of the missionary lecture she had 
heard and of her desire to become a for- 
eign missionary to Africa. Mrs. Worth was 
a Christian woman, and though she dreaded 
such a separation from her daughter, she 
was glad and thankful. She expressed her- 
self so to Helen, and shared her happiness 
with her. 

Judge Worth was a thorough business 
man, whose standard of life was based on 
money, which he considered the most im- 
portant. And with his millions of dollars 
he wished to place Helen high in the world, 
as he thought, and for this reason he would 
not give his consent to her becoming a 



May 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



141 



missionary. He was very fond of her, and 
wanted to keep her as the reigning belle in 
the best society of Chicago, among the 
wealthy people. Up to this time his daugh- 
ter had not gone against his wishes, and 
now that she had spoken to him twice 
about the subject of missions, which he 
considered too little a work for his daugh- 
ter to engage in, it made him very angry. 
He sought his wife's boudoir. 

" Margaret, something must be done to 
cause Helen to forget this fantastic notion 
of becoming a missionary," he exclaimed 
immediately upon entering the room. Mrs. 
Worth, at this sudden outburst from her 
husband, looked up with surprise. 

" Why do you wish her to forget it, 
Henry? I think it is such a noble work." 

" So you too are plotting against me. I 
might have thought as much," he said dis- 
dainfully. 

" No, Henry," said his wife quietly, " I 
am not plotting against you; I am only 
considering our daughter's happiness." 

"Happiness!" he exclaimed sternly. 
" Have I not been considering her happi- 
ness? Think of the money that will some 
day be hers. Think of the fine, wealthy 
young men of our circle, who would gladly 
marry her. What else could she want?" 

" She wants your approval of her choice 
of a life partner and life work," was the 
earnest answer. 

But Judge Worth's approval in this mat- 
ter was not to be obtained. His proud 
heart would not relent; he was determined 
to carry out his plans for his daughter, re- 
gardless of her desires. At his next words 
a dread filled her heart, which ached for 
her daughter, for whom she saw a fierce 
fight ahead. 

" I am still the head of this home, and 
I am to be obeyed. Helen shall forget this 
whim," and with that the subject was 
dropped for the time. 

Two weeks later Judge Worth, wife, and 
daughter, Helen, were driven to meet the 
train that was to carry them to a resort in 
Florida, where they were going to spend 
the remaining months of the winter. Helen 
was glad to go on account of her mother, 
whose health had been failing for several 
years. She hoped the change would prove 
beneficial to her. Yet Helen knew the im- 



port of this sudden departure, though her 
father said nothing to her, and she sin- 
cerely prayed that he would be awakened 
and allow her to carry out what she felt 
to be a direct call from God. 

One evening, several weeks after their 
arrival in Florida, Judge Worth found his 
daughter in the arbor reading a letter, 
which, from her expression, seemed to con- 
tain much pleasure for her. His suspicions 
were aroused at once, and he asked author- 
itatively, " Helen, who may be the author 
of that letter in which you seem so ab- 
sorbed? " 

Helen started, for she had not noted her 
father's presence before, but she answered 
quietly and frankly, " It is from Robert 
Horton, father." 

His face grew dark as he said, " So you 
are still interested in that fellow; he is a 
fanatic, and will never be of much worth 
to anybody." 

A hurt look came into Helen's eyes as 
she answered, " He is such a noble man, 
and will be of great service to God and his 
fellow-men." 

Her father replied in a disgusted tone, 
"Pshaw! Noble! Where can there be a 
more noble young man than Herbert Man- 
ning, whose father is a millionaire?" 

" Nobility is not measured altogether by 
money, father," was Helen's reply. 

Judge Worth became very angry at what 
he termed obstinacy in his daughter, and 
determined more firmly to conquer her will 
according to his plans, and he answered her 
very sternly: 

" Helen, I forbid you to allow another 
word to pass between you and this man." 
After saying these words he turned and 
walked down the street. 

Helen sat gazing into the leafy foliage 
above her, feeling hurt and angry with her 
father, but then thinking how wrong it was 
to feel that way, she silently prayed for 
forgiveness and for patience until her fa- 
ther should be made to relent. She rose 
and went to her room and closed the door. 

Some time afterwards Robert Horton re- 
ceived a letter which ran as follows: 

Dear Robert: 

Father has forbidden me to write to you or re- 
ceive letters from you. Let us pray for his awak- 
ening, and also for guidance in our future lives. 
With God all things are possible, you know. 

As ever, 
Helen. 



142 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1920 



Weeks dragged into months, and Mrs. 
Worth did not regain her health, but rather 
weakened, partly because of her very ill 
health, and partly of anxiety for her daugh- 
ter, who was growing- thin and pale. So 
on the first day of May they arrived at 
their Chicago home. Mrs. Worth's health 
was now so bad that she was confined to 
her bed as a result of tuberculosis. 

The husband and daughter watched over 
their silent, suffering loved one with hearts 
filled with the deepest grief and anguish. 
One beautiful June evening she lay quiet 
and peaceful. Her eyes were closed, and 
she appeared to be sleeping. Suddenly she 
opened her eyes and looked at her loved 
ones, so anxiously watching over her. She 
asked them to kneel by her bedside, and 
then she prayed first for her daughter, that 
she might be guided and protected in that 
work to which she had been called, last 
for the husband and father, that he might 
be touched and awakened to the great need 
of workers in God's kingdom. Then she 
fell into a deep, peaceful sleep, from which 
she never awoke. 



The next day after the burial Helen was 
seated in her room, when a servant came 
to her and said that her father wished to 
see her in the library. As she entered and 
met her father's grief-stricken look, tears 
filled her eyes. She went to him and threw 
her arms about his neck, his arm closed 
about her as he pressed her to his heart, 
and thus they stood for some time. 

Finally the father spoke with a voice 
filled with emotion, " My dear daughter, 
your mother's prayer has been answered. 
I have resolved to give the rest of my life, 
whether it be long or short, to the service 
of God, and to aid in my weak way in the 
uplift of my fellow-men. I am thankful to 
God that I have a daughter noble and 
courageous enough to give her life to so 
great a work." 

About two years later Reverend and Mrs. 
Robert Horton embarked on a ship which 
sailed from New York to Africa. A fine 
looking old man whose heart was filled 
with joy waved good-bye to them as the 
ship moved slowly out of the harbor. 

Bridgewater, Va. 



China Notes for January 



Anna M. Hutchison 



THE observance of the foreign New 
Year has become compulsory in the 
province of Shansi, and also the 
festivities formerly observed at the Chi- 
nese New Year have in places been trans- 
ferred to this new season. Sister Clapper 
writes from Shouyang: "The Chinese of 
Shouyang were very diligent in their ob- 
servance of New Year's, 1920. The streets 
were all decorated with flags, and the busi- 
ness men exchanged name cards, which is 
the Chinese method of expressing esteem 
for each other. Like all their other festal 
occasions, the most important part of the 
whole observance was the theatrical per- 
formance. The weather was mild and the 
people flocked into the city by the hun- 
dreds to attend the play, and after the play 
the mission compound was visited by the 
multitudes. The theatrical lasted three 
days, during which time religious services 
were conducted on the same ground. In 
addition to the verbal message many tracts 



and Scripture portions were distributed, 
which we hope was ' bread cast upon the 
waters.' " ^ 

The native brethren have worked out a 
plan for an evangelistic campaign in the 
surrounding Ping Ting villages. It will 
take about three months to carry out the 
plan. Some of our regularly-employed 
evangelists are helping in this, but there 
will also be considerable time donated by 
the native Christians. We are exceeding- 
ly thankful for this effort on their part. 
Pray for them. ^ 

Along with the many joys of mission- 
ary work, there sometimes comes a real 
heartache. Such was recently Miss Metz- 
ger's experience when she was compelled 
to expel one of the brightest girls in school. 
The pupil was guilty of a great deal of 
stealing, and when it was found out that 
she was responsible for it she had to go. 
We had hoped for something really good 



May 

1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



143 



from this girl, and the disappointment is a 
keen one indeed. ^ 

The shortage of women teachers makes 
many a difficulty in girls' school work here. 
Every year a long search has to be made 
to find some one suitable. Just now another 
search is going on for the Ping Ting girls' 
school. YYe have at present a most effi- 
cient teacher, but there is an opportunity 
for her to have more normal training, and 
as she is a born teacher and an executive 
we are eager for the opportunity to be 
given her; but where is the teacher to take 
her place? ^ 

Bro. Bright made a business trip to 
Tientsin. We are planning to import some 
builders from the coast to help in the build- 
ing here next summer. Their wages are 
greater, but they do more and better work 
than the unskilled workmen of the interior, 
and we are hoping that workmen can thus 
be obtained who will not require such care- 
ful oversight as those who have been doing 
our building heretofore. Other missions 
who have tried this experiment advise our 
doing it also. g 

Sister Ernest Wampler, who has been 
located at Liao Chou since the early part of 
the summer, recently has been removed 
from her home to the hospital, and at this 
writing seems to be slowly improving. She 
is able to sit up considerably and walk 
around some, and is bright and cheerful. 
Only the Father knows what patience and 
endurance it must take thus to keep sweet 
and patient under such testing circum- 
stances and hours of waiting when the 
heart longs to be in the work to which one 
feels called, that of helping the many 
needy, sin-s'ck souls about us. May we 
have the earnest prayers of the home 
church in behalf of our dear sister and her 
companion, that God's grace may be suffi- 
cient for these days of waiting, and that 
his will may be fully worked out in their 
lives and his name be glorified through it 

One week of this month was spent by 
Sister Hutchison in visiting a couple of our 
out-stations, Ch'ang Ch'eng and Yu She 
Hsien. As with much of our work here. 
a great deal of time was necessarily con- 
sumed on the road, three days only of this 



week being left for work. But were those 
days of slow travel through the valleys and 
over the mountains time lost? Nay, rather, 
, they were hours of real heart preparation 
for the work ahead. During those other- 
wise lonely hours of travel, inspiration was 
gained by the reading of the Visitor, which 
we had not had time at home to read; and 
then the Father came preciously near us 
and could speak to us in his " still small 
. voice " as we had time to meditate on him 
amidst the scenes of nature. The days at 
these out-stations were spent in visiting 
and teaching in the homes of the school- 
children and in the homes of our native 
Christians. A native woman of the place 
was secured to go with me into the homes. 
We received a hearty welcome everywhere 
and had a blessed week of witnessing for 
our Master. We pray that some seed may 
have found good ground in which to bring 
forth fruit to his glory. While on this trip 
the faithful witnessing of our cook, both 
on the road and in the villages, at every 
opportunity, again impressed us forcibly 
with the fact that the most humble can 
witness for the Master everywhere and 
anywhere, if they have the heart and the 
will to do so. j» 

Just as we close these notes the sad news 
comes from Sister Bright, in Peking, that 
Bro. Bright, who had gone to the coast on 
business, is sick in a Peking hospital with 
what they fear is that dread disease, the 
typhus fever, a disease that seems to be 
peculiar to China, and from which it is said 
that only one out of every hundred for- 
eigners recovers. Our hearts are touched 
with this unexpected news, both in behalf 
of the suffering one, and for Sister Bright, 
who already has laid to rest two of her 
loved ones on the little hillside overlook- 
ing Liao Chou. Much as the work needs 
our brother, and our deep sympathies go 
out in their behalf, yet we are trying to " in 
nothing be anxious," but in prayer to com- 
mit all to the Father, knowing that only 
thus can all work together for good and to 
his glory. We are in prayer much there 
days, eagerly awaiting each day's message. 

■J* 
Sister Myrtle Pollock left Liao Chou the 
226. of this month to attend a nurses' con- 
ference at Shanghai. She was to go by 



144 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1920 



way of Ping Ting, Peking and Tientsin. 
Word now comes that, having reached 
Peking, she and Sister Edna Flory were 
enlisted in helping care for Bro. Bright. 
Drs. Wampler and Horning have also just 
reached Peking. Besides these, Bro. Bright 
is having the best medical attention avail- 
able, and perhaps in no place in all the 
world could he get better medical help for 
this special disease than in the city of 
Peking, where we have specialists along 
that line. 



Miss Shock is visiting in the homes of 
the city and getting ready to take over 
Miss Homing's work, as Miss Horning 
will be going on furlough in March. 

The Shouyang Station recently has suc- 
ceeded in renting a larger and better prop- 
erty for its out-station work at Ching 
Ch'uan. The work there has been pro- 
gressing nicely, and the present quarters 
are too 'small and inconvenient properly to 
care for it. They hope to occupy the new 
quarters after the Chinese New Year. 



China Mission Notes for February 



Anna M. Hutchison 



DURING this month, as well as the 
previous ones, we have had no long 
spells of cold weather in China, 
even in the high altitude of Liao Chou. 
Although at times the temperature regis- 
tered eight and ten below tevo, in 
general we have had an open winter, and 
no great amount of snow. During the 
last week of the month the weather was 
all that could be desired, for which we were^ 
especially thankful, this being the national 
week of evangelism in China. 

**« 
During this week our own mission, along 
with the other missions of China, has made 
a special effort to reach the unsaved by 
going out in companies each day to the 
villages and in the city, preaching, singing, 
selling Gospels and distributing tracts, the 
service being all voluntary. The week for 
evangelism has been chosen from this time 
of the year — that is, at the Chinese New 
Year season — because at this time the 
people in general are idle and the workers 
can thus get a better hearing. 

At our Ping Ting Station, during this 
week, about thirty-five men and boys went 
out daily in this work. Some eight hun- 
dred people were reached by them each 
day, and fourteen have enrolled as in- 
quirers as a result of the efforts of the 
week. In this work the women, too, were 
not idle, as eighteen women and girls went 
out teaching in the city and village homes. 
Forty services were held in seventeen vil- 



lage homes and twenty-eight services in the 
city homes, most of these being homes of 
Christians or inquirers. In all, some five 
thousand people heard the Word of God 
preached to them, in the city of Ping Ting 
and surrounding villages. 

At Liao Chou thirty-one men and boys 
went out preaching, selling Gospels and 
distributing tracts, reaching about seven 
hundred people daily, and during the week 
over four thousand. They preached in 
thirty-three villages within the radius of 
some ten miles, a number of these villages, 
receiving a message each day. One thou- 
sand one hundred and seventy-four 
Gospels were sold and over two thousand 
tracts were distributed. Among the women 
and schoolgirls twenty-four gladly gave 
some time in helping carry the message to 
their people. Ten villages were visited and 
the message given in fifty-eight homes. 
The total reached by the women workers 
was one thousand one hundred and twenty- 
seven, which, with those reached by the 
men, made a grand total of over five 
thousand in the city of Liao Chou and sur- 
rounding villages who heard a portion of 
the gospel message during the past week. 

We have not at this writing received any 
word yet from our other station, Shou 
Yang, yet we are sure the missionaries 
and Christians there also have taken ad- 
vantage of this splendid opportunity to tell 
the gospel message. * 



May 

1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



145 



The old Chinese calendar is regulated by 
the moon, and an intercalary month in- 
serted after every thirty-three months, in 
order to make the same date fall in the 
same season of the year. Consequently 
some years have thirteen months instead 
of twelve. After the establishment of the 
republic the central government decreed 
that the foreign calendar be used, and an 
attempt was made by the local official this 
year to have the people observe the foreign 
New Year. They went to call on their 
friends and give them their calling cards, 




Mrs. Yirau and Her Babe. Her Hus- 
band Is the Doctor Who Served at 
Ping Ting, Shansi, While Dr. 
Wampler Was on Furlough 



and also placed the new mottoes on the 
doorposts, but otherwise no change in the 
old customs was noticeable. Their new 
Year, which this year came on the 20th of 
February, and later than usual, is followed 
by two weeks of general holiday, the shops 
and schools being closed, and work in 
general laid aside while the time is spent 
in visiting and feasting, and the season 
closed up by three days of public festivities. 
J* 

Misses Bessie Rider and Edna Flory, of 
Ping Ting, and Mrs. Pollock, of Liao, at- 
tended the nurses' convention held in 
Shanghai Feb. 5-10. 

•J* 

Miss Minerva Metzger and Messrs. 
Vaniman and Bowman, of Ping Ting, Miss 



Winnie Cripe and Mr. Norman Seese, of 
Liao, and Miss Grace Clapper, and Mr. 
Byron Flory, of Shou Yang, attended the 
Shansi-Chihli Teachers' Association held in 
Peking Feb. 25 and 26. 

J* 
Dr. Wampler, of Ping Ting, and Dr. 
Brubaker, of Liao, attended the Medical 
Conference held in Peking Feb. 21-28. 



Dr. Wampler and wife returned to. Ping 
Ting Feb. 5, after having been in the home- 
land for about a year, enjoying their fur- 
lough vacation. They brought with them 
the doctor's eleven-year-old nephew, Tru- 
man Wampler, and were welcomed back by 
both Chinese and foreigner. 

J* 

Bro. Bright, who at our last writing was 
in a hospital in Peking, suffering from an 
attack of typhus fever, is now rapidly re- 
covering. He has been removed from the 
hospital and plans soon to return to Ping 
Ting Chou. While he lay so low in the 
hospital their little son, Calvin, was taken 
to the same place, very ill with " flu." He 
also has recovered, and we can but praise 
the loving Father, who has so graciously 
heard our many prayers and restored to 
us these dear ones. 

"HERE AM I; SEND ME" 

Rachel E. Myers 
Everywhere we hear the call, 

Wanting, needing thee ; 
Many people would not fall 

If you'd say, " Send me." 

Many far-off heathen lands 

Wait and hope for thee; 
Go, and say with outstretched hands, 

"Here am I; send me." 

There are places close at home 

Needing only thee ; 
Go and say, "I'll help them some; 

Here am I; send me." 

There are places all around 

Needing you and me; 
We should say, in duty bound, 

"Here am I; send me." 

We should always gladly do 
W T hat our work may be ; 

Say to God, when he calls you, 
"Here am I; send me." 



146 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1920 



India Notes for February 



Anetta C. Mow 



THE temperance lectures, which we 
hoped to have at Bulsar for our 
Christians, and in the Hindu com- 
munity, Feb. 21 and 22, had to be recalled 
on account of influenza. Miss Mary Camp- 
bell, traveling secretary of the W. C. T. U., 
was to have been with us. 

Influenza is revisiting our Christian com- 
munities at Bulsar, Vyara and Jalalpor. We 
are thankful that it is not of the virulent 
type which passed over India last year. Bro. 
E. H. Eby was quite sick for several days 
and it was feared for awhile that he would 
have pneumonia. ^ 

Dr. Laura Cottrell is home again and is 
improving nicely after her operation for 
appendicitis at Miraj. 

Bro. Arnolds' are now at home at Ankles- 
var. They expect to go to Mahablesvar to 
keep house for the new Marathi mission- 
aries during the next two months, while 
they study the language. 

Sisters Sara Replogle and Elizabeth Kint- 
ner are enjoying their study of Gujarati un- 
der the supervision of Bro. E. H. Eby, who 
has introduced the direct method of lan- 
guage study among our Gujarati language 
students. & • 

Time is almost here again when the mis- 
sionaries' children must leave home for 
their school in the hills. It means a lot for 
these children to be separated from their 
parents for nine months of the year, and 
we do not wonder that they dread to see 
the day of going draw near. 

The first automobile in our mission is 
now being used by Bro. Garner at Vada. 
We feel that it is going to prove a great 
blessing to them in their work. Vada will 
not be so far removed from the railroad 
and from our other stations, since this ma- 
chine can make the trip out in a few hours. 

The Rev. Dr. G. P. Taylor,' of the Irish 
Presbyterian Mission at Ahmedabad, died 
Feb. 21. Dr. Taylor had worked long and 
faithfully in India and his death comes as a 



loss, not only to his own mission, but to the 
whole of India. His Gujarati grammar is 
the book which all of our missionaries in 
Gujarat have studied. , 

About the middle of April Bro. Stovers', 
Bro. Pittengers', B. Mary Royer and Goldie 
Swartz expect to sail for the homeland. 
Our doctors advise Sister Swartz's return 
at this time. Sister Swartz has not been 
well during the three years she has been in 
India, but she has bravely faced her disap- 
pointments and has shown herself to be a 
most capable worker. Every missionary on 
the field is sad to see her go, but we hope 
and pray she will have such medical help 
at home that she will be able to return to 
us soon. ^ 

All readers will rejoice with us that the 
second missionary party has arrived. The 
party landed in Bombay March 3. All were 
well except Brother and Sister Butter- 
baugh's baby girl. She had been sick for a 
few days with dysentery. The Butterbaugh 
family came on to Bulsar in order to have 
the doctor's care, and we are glad to report 
that the baby is much better. 

Bro. Arthur Millers' and Benjamin Sum- 
mer will remain at Bulsar for their language 
study. Bro. Shulls', Nettie Brown and the 
Butterbaughs will start to the hills as soon 
as possible, to attend the Marathi Language 
School during the next two months. 

During the last week of January and the 
first half of February, at each station, a 
we^k for special evangelistic work was set 
apart. During this week effort is always 
made to have our Indian workers get out 
into the villages to preach and testify, and 
distribute Gospels and tracts. 

In the last month two village love feasts 
were held in villages out from Vyara. Sixty- 
five partook of the feast at one place, and 
fifty-five at the other. Although this service 
is very new to most of these village people, 
so lately won for Christ, we believe that 
the service is a blessing to them and that 






May 

1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



147 



they will gradually learn to know its mean- 
ing and sacredness. 

& 
Feb. 27-March 1 the Gujarati District 
Meeting was held at Bulsar. Owing to a 
number of circumstances, the attendance 
was not as large this year as usual. The 
opening session, on Friday evening, was 
given to the discussion of temperance work. 
Saturday was Educational Day. In the fore- 
noon we heard about the status of practical 
education in India and the conditions in our 
Christian communities. In the afternoon 
we learned about the remedy. Bro. Lichty 
showed very clearly that Jesus Christ is the 
only remedy for India. In the evening Bro. 



Stover preached a powerful sermon on 
Social Purity. On Sunday, the Sunday- 
school and evangelistic meetings were held. 
The business meeting of the District was 
held on Monday. Three interesting papers 
were discussed. ^ 

From the Gujarat District Bro. Stover 
was appointed to represent us on Standing 
committee at Annual Meeting; Bro. J. M. 
Blough, alternate. From the Marathi Dis- 
trict Bro. Pittenger was elected to represent 
the Second District of India on the Standing 
Committee, with Bro. J. I. Kaylor as alter- 
nate. 

Yvara. 



Encouragement for Parents 



A Brother 



After reading Bro. Sherfy's letter in the 
March Visitor, I feel like adding a few 
words along this line of calling our mem- 
bers into service. 

There are those in our colleges and 
Volunteer Bands that need encouragement, 
'and some need financial help to complete 
their preparation. Others have parents 
who need converting, that (instead of od- 
jecting) they may have a vision of the 
world's need of Christian service, such 
as Christ gave and wants, and feel the 
joy of a father or mother who can, with 
the whole heart, give a son or daughter 
for the salvation of souls and the hasten- 
ing of the coming of our Lord. 

I have in mind just now four particular 
brethren who have spent several years in 
college and have completed courses, and 
I believe if these brethren had been called 
to active Christian service, when through 
college or before, that they would have 
accepted joyfully. 

Now they hold responsible positions in 
the business world. Will they ever be 
called, or would they as readily accept if 
called? 

They may give liberally of their dollars 
for missions. They doubtless pray for the 
unsaved souls of the world. 

But, brother, sister, is that your idea of 
Christ's plan of evangelizing the world? 

What are a few dollars compared to the 



life service of a talented, consecrated 
young follower of Christ? 

If we have the idea that money is the 
pressing need, I know of no way we can 
get it easier, and more of it, than by doing 
all we can for the Christian growth of our 
young converts; and to the extent that 
our membership is brought closer to 
Christ, and used in Christian service, will 
the treasuries of our church be filled, 
cheerfully. 

Those congregations (or individuals) 
who are spending most for the Chris- 
tian education by sending their young 
people to Bible institutes, training schools, 
conventions, etc., are raising the most 
money for missions and doing it more joy-' 
fully. I should not have said spending, 
for it really is investing, and an investment 
that is paying large and ever-increasing 
dividends now, and how much larger 
than we know Christ will reveal when he 
comes. 

Oakton, Va. 



THE SHARE PLAN 

I You will want a share in support- 
| ing the mission work in India. Native 
J workers, boarding-school pupils and J 
general expense are included. 

...................... ....,4 



148 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1920 



What if the 60,000,000 Reachables of India 
Become Mohammedan ! 

J. I. Kaylor 



TO realize what this might mean we 
should look at the teachings and the 
practices of the Moslem. 

He is a monotheist, believing in one God, 
Allah, who is an abstract being, who has no 
direct connection with the affairs of men, 
and does not inspire the worshiper to good- 
ness. Mohammed was the prophet of this 
God on the earth. The Koran is his holy- 
book and of more authority than the Bible, 
as he thinks it came down from heaven. Of 
course these two books do not agree on 
many things, so he takes his and discredits 
the Bible. 

Again, he denies that Jesus Christ is God, 
or the Son of God, as there cannot be two 
Gods. He will admit that Jesu was a good 
Man and a great Prophet, that his mother 
was a virgin, that he was great and did 
many wonderful things, but when the Jews 
laid hands on him, he escaped from them 
and went to heaven, and will return as the 
Prince and Warrior of Mohammed. So he 
cannot admit of Jesus Christ as divine Sav- 
ior, unless his followers can be so trans- 
formed in life and character as to show that 
they have really " been with Jesus," and he 
can regenerate and has divine power. Close- 
ly connected with this is the question of 
the cross. Dr. Zwemer says, " The cross of 
Christ is the missing link of the Moslem 
creed. If you can get that in, the chain 
holds; without that it fails." This is the 
very heart and center of our faith, but our 
Moslem friend will deny it, and show you 
from his book that it is not so. But he is 
finding that there are some contradictions 
in the Koran. He is hard to answer. It 
must be seen why he hates the cross and 
all that it stands for. He does not want to 
see the red cross, and he has substituted the 
red crescent. They say the same that the 
crucifiers of Jesus said: "If he is God why 
did he not save himself? " The massacres 
of Armenians have done much to show him 
the reality of the Christian religion, as 
nothing else would prompt martyrdom as it 
does. 



Perhaps the reason that the Moslem does 
not want anything to do with the cross is 
that he sees no need for it from his idea of 
sin. He realizes nothing of the guilt Paul 
proves on all in Romans; no original sin; 
all children are innocent. He divides sin 
into classes and stages. A lie may be " in- 
different, allowed, praiseworthy, incumbent, 
forbidden, or hateful." 

But to more practical things. He has 
no idea of the sanctity of the institution 
of the family life. He practices polygamy; 
women are bought and sold. One day I 
heard that a Hindu woman had run away 
from her husband. He brought her back, 
but she was not satisfied, so he said that he 
would sell her. He took her to the court- 
house (just across the road from our mis- 
sion bungalow at Vada) and took the nec- 
essary steps, and put her up at auction. He 
wanted back the money that he had paid 
her father-in-law for her, and further than 
that he. did not care. She was auctioned off 
to a Mussulman, who took her to his home, 
and the last I heard they were living happy 
— for that country and such a condition! - 

But another. In a near-by village a wom- 
an was for sale, and a Mussulman bought 
her and added her to his harem. A widow 
gave birth to a child. The grown son at 
once took legal steps to have the child reg- 
istered as an illegitimate child. It was said 
that an old Mussulman across the way was 
the father. Getting all the women they 
can as wives and concubines is one effec- 
tive way they have of spreading their re- 
ligion. So they cannot understand how the 
high ideal of the Christian home can be 
lived out. And their idea of the future' 
blessedness is as to how many women they 
will have there. 

Again, as to- drink and tobacco. In the 
law of the Moslem there are many strict 
prohibitions, but even in the days when 
Mohammed wrote them, drinking was in- 
dulged in, and ever since this legislation has 
not been operative. We see many times 
the evidences that they have been drinking, 



May 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



149 



and they are slaves to smoking, as are oth- 
er Indian peoples. One devout Mussulman 
said to a missionary: " Our town is being 
ruined by drink; not only that, but all over 
the Punjab the habit is laying hold of our 
young men, and if reports are true it is 
worse down country than here." In his 
town of 7,000 population the liquor sales 
had multiplied forty times in ten years, the 
license increasing from Rs. 300 to Rs. 12,- 
000. And the sorry part of it is that the 
English Government is favoring, protect- 
ing, and pushing the drink traffic as hard as 
it can, and will listen to no prohibitive 
measures proposed by the Indians them- 
selves. During the war no place could be 
found for a shipment of Bibles, but the 
holds and wharves were stacked full of 
whisky cases. The liquor is found in their 
houses, about their premises, and as to their 
bodies, they are not as clean as the Hindus. 
Our missionary women often speak of not 
wanting to go to the Mussulman quarter 
and houses, as they are so dirty. 

Those who are land owners, contractors 
and the like employ many men as servants, 
tenants, and hired help. They are no easy 
task masters, either, and these poorer and 
helpless people are practically in slavery 
and have to do the greatest amount of work 
for the least wage or allowance. 

Though this is the last religion to be es- 
tablished in the world, it has the least so- 
cial influence. It has always believed in 
and many times carried on its missionary 
work with the sword. 

So these are some of the beliefs and prac- 
tices of the Mohammedans. What will it 
mean if these 60,000,000 reachables of India 
are turned to this, but slavery of the body 
and the loss of the soul? And Islam is 
lying in wait to draw and receive them as 
they come if Christianity does not. If the 
Son shall make free, this only is true lib- 
erty. 

Jesus Christ must be practically demon- 
strated and interpreted to India in the lives 
and characters of those who carry the mes- 
sage there, so that these may be led to 
know and follow the shackle-breaking 
Cross. Many can be won, and are being 
won, but not without sacrifice of the best 
that can be given. Rev. Ewing, of Lahore, 



India, puts it this way: "For this specific 
task a small army of Indian, European and 
American recruits must somehow be en- 
listed. The call is for the brightest and 
best young people of the church. Should 
you enter that field you will find a sphere 
in the midst of those intellectual, cultured 
and, in all respects, intensely interesting 
people, that will make a constant and stren- 
uous demand upon all that you are, and all 
that you have acquired throughout the 
years of your preparation. 

" Such a gift from the church to India 
is something that soon must be forthcom- 
ing, if the hopes entertained during the 
past years are not to be shattered, if the 
splendid opportunity of the hour is not to 
be ignored, and if the blessing that has been 
promised to a faithful churcji is to be real- 
ized. 

" An appalling prospect faces the youth 
or man who contemplates the public pro- 
fession of his faith in Christ. In his ex- 
change for his new faith he must relinquish 
everything which men commonly count 
dear. 

" Young men and women, such men and 
women need such men and women as you, 
that through your effort in teaching, guid- 
ing, sympathizing and loving they may be 
won to make the great sacrifice. 

" In the case of these sixty millions of 
the lowly, we may say, with all conviction, 
that this is the opportunity of all the cen- 
turies. I fear for the Indian church, for 
this great multitude which is still without, 
and for the Christian church in the West, 
if this time of all times for the reaping of 
a great harvest be allowed to pass while we 
are doing less than our best." 



THE SHARE PLAN OF 
SUPPORT 

Under this plan the expense of a 
mission station is estimated and the 
amount divided into shares of $50.00. 
Each subscriber for a share will re- 
ceive a nicely printed certificate and 
information concerning the station 
during the year. 



150 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1920 



□ 



©Ifp ©orkwa' Qomrr 



□ 



The editor invites helpful contributions for this department of the Visitor 



(Editor. — The following reports from mission 
workers are deemed worthy of space here.; 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY REPORT 

BRUMMETTS CREEK Missionary 
Society was organized in April, 1919. 
We held eight meetings; average at- 
tendance, eight. We gave liberally to 
world-wide missions in August, during the 
District Meeting which was held here. 

Recently we sent $5 to a widow who has 
several small children. In this mail we 
are sending $6.50 to the Armenians. We 
are planning greater things this year. 

Our members belong to five different de- 
nominations, and work together in har- 
mony. 

Much sickness prevented several meet- 
ings. We held the meetings at the church 
during the summer months, and in the 
homes of members during winter. One 
meeting was a failure, because of literature 
not being sent to each member. All are 
anxious to take part and help along in 
every meeting. 

The officers are: President, Anna M. 
Whitson; vice-president, Blanche V. B.rad- 
shaw; secretary, Atlas H. Bradshaw; treas* 
urer, Ruth M. Bailey. 

Relief, N. C. Blanche V. Bradshaw. 

A MISSIONARY COMMITTEE 

REPORT FROM SUNFIELD, 

MICHIGAN 

Erba Gorham 
Question No. 8: What definite work have 
we planned for the year 1920? 

1. Missionary program in Christian 
Workers' Society once a month, with a 
missionary collection. 

2. A missionary sermon once a month. 

3. A missionary talk or reading by a 
member of the missionary committee be- 
fore the Sunday-school, once a month. 

4. We planned to have an adult mission 
study class, with graduates. 



5. We also plan for primary and junior 
missionary instruction. 

6. We had ten missionary books in the 
library and plan on adding ten new ones in 
1920. 

7. We will try and get the Missionary 
Visitor in every home. 

8. We plan for a community survey and 
a Christian stewardship canvass, trying to 
get thirty members (or about two-thirds 
of the total membership) to tithe. 

Editor's Note: The above is in answer to 
question eight on the blank sent to the 
Missionary Committees. How do the plans 
in your church compare with these? 

A LETTER FROM LA VERNE 

General Mission Board, Elgin, 111. — Dear 
Brethren: 

Recently our church has raised $1,885 
for the Near East relief. This was largely 
is excess of the amount which was asked. 

Would you please send me information 
concerning the new share plan of which 
you make mention in your last letter? 

We are getting ready for the study of 
the book, " Christian Americanization." 
Our plan is to have the classes meet in the 
homes of the members. There will be ten 
meetings in as many homes of the congre- 
gation each week. By this means we think 
we will be able to reach more than we 
could if we were to have a class at the 
church. These classes will begin the first 
week of April. The ten teachers are now 
meeting weekly to study the book in 
preparation for their work. The presence 
of about 500 Mexicans in our town affords 
quite an opportunity and has awakened 
some interest in the subject of American- 
ization. 

Yours fraternally, 

R. H. Miller. 

La Verne, Calif., March 8. 






May 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



151 



PROGRAM AT STERLING 

The following splendid missionary pro- 
gram was rendered by the church at Ster- 
ling, 111. Much of the material used was 
secured from the book, " Missionary Pro- 
grams," which can be secured for 35c from 
the General Mission Board: 

Song: The Lord of the Harvest Calls 
Prayer 

Song: Jesus Loves Even Me, Primary 

Recitation: A Boy's Prayer, Wayne Sheidler 
Recitation: What I Can Give, ..Ethel Cosy 
Song: The World Children for Jesus, 

Primary 

Recitation: The Little Brown Girl and I, 

Ruth Gerdes 

Exercise: Lessons in Arithmetic. Mae Was- 

ner, Beulah Burk, Murray Lindsley. 

Everet Burk 
Recitation. The Little Widows of India. 

Ethel Cosy 

Recitation: The Children's Pledge. 

Bertha Frantz 

Recitation: When I Met My Master Face to 

Face Miss Eva Kilhefner 

Presentation of Diplomas to Mission Study 

Classes by Pastor 

Short Address, Rev. Claybaugh 

Chorus: On to the Goal 

Devotional Services 

Singing and Prayer Congregation 

Stereopticon Lecture Rev. ClaybaugH 

Male Quartet: Speed Away. Mr. Kilhefner. 
Mr. Cosy, Mr. Whisler, Mr. Slater 

Free-will offering for the Lord's work in 
Chicago. j$ ,j$ 

AN UNSOLICITED TESTIMONY 
The General Mission Board of the Church 
of the Brethren, Elgin, 111. — Brethren: 

ThinkiHg you would not be adverse to 
hear from a student of missionary literature, 
even though he may belong to another com- 
munion than your own, I am writing you 
simply to state how much I have enjoyed 
reading your booklets, " China — A Chal- 
lenge to the Church," and "A Year with 
Our Missionaries in India." I took in- 
creasing delight in the stories told of the 
work being done on both mission fields, es- 
pecially with the last booklet anent India. 
By the use of the large map, always lying 
flat on the floor by my side, I was able to 



trace the journey taken over the mission 
field in India. I can truly say that no 
book on missions ever proved more in- 
structive than this one, and, together with 
the large map of the field, it ought to be 
in the hands of every student of missions 
in your church. I am confident that a 
wide circulation of both books will result 
in an increased devotion to missions 
throughout your church. That such may be 
the result of the influence of these booklets 
is the prayer of 

Fraternally yours, 

George Humberstone. 
Toledo, Ohio, March 15. 
& *** 
THE BRIDGE BUILDER 
An old man going a lone highway 
Came at the evening cold and gray 
To a chasm vast and deep and wide. 
The old man crossed in the twilight dim; 
The sullen stream had no fear for him. 
But he turned when safe on the other side 
And built a bridge to span the tide. 
" Old man," said a fellow pilgrim near, 
" You are wasting your strength building 

here; 
Your journey ends with the ending day; 
You never again will pass this way; 
You've crossed the chasm deep and wide- 
Why build ye here at the evening tide?" 
The builder raised his old gray head. 
" Good friend, in the path I've come," he 

said, 
" There followeth after me today 
A youth whose feet must pass this way: 
The chasm that held no fear for me 
To the fair-haired youth may a pitfall be. 
He, too, must cross in the twilight dim. 
Good friend, I'm building this bridge for 

him." — Selected. 



NOTICE TO MISSIONARY 
COMMITTEES 

The reports for 1919 have been over- 
looked by a number of Committees. Has 
yours been sent to the General Mission 
Board? 



152 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1920 



Savior to All 



So long ago the Savior came — 
We've now almost forgot His name. 
We call Him Jesus, Lord of all; 

We call Him God's Begotten Son, 
And humbly we before Him fall, 

To worship Him for what He's done. 

Our prayers for self on high ascend, 
And prayers for friends with them we blend. 
We pray, " Cleanse us from sin's dark 
stain "; 

We pray for blessings on the poor, 
We pray for power in His name; 

And for the needs we feel so sore. 

But have we not forgot the task? 
For as we from our Savior ask 
For daily needs, will we fulfill 

Our part and do our best to bring 
The kingdom in which sages tell, 

And angels in the highest sing: 

" Of peace on earth, good will to men," 
Of love which shall the whole world win? 
Comes this about by seraph's song 

Or must we His torch-bearers be, 
To light this world where darkness long 

Has peoples held beyond the sea? 



If we would have Him hear our plea, 
Our love must not stop with the sea. 
We must compass the world around, 

For sin, and hate and woe and pain 
In many lands may still be found. 

Christ came for them— not you — in vain? 

Can you call Him your Savior dear, 
And let the heathen bow so near, 
Down to their wooden idols dumb, 

While you in church on worship bent, 
Some sacred tune with rapture hum, 

And praise the Lord Whom love has sent? 

The Lord looks down on you this day, 

And longingly He has to say: 

" My ' other sheep ' have not been brought 

Into my fold of love and joy. 
Before I give the blessing sought 

You all must enter My employ, 

And seek the wandering and lost, 
For I must have, whate'er the cost. 
These millions for whom I have died; 

My blessings are bestowed on those 
Who minister to the crucified 

In earth's great harvest field of woe." 

F. M. H. 



Tapestry Weavers 



(This beautiful poem has often appeared anony- 
mously. C. T. Wettstein, of Milwaukee, Wis., 
searched for the author recently, and received word 
from Mr. F. Marvin, of Savannah, Mo., and Mrs 
Frances Carter, of Stellia, Mo., saying that Anson 
G. Chester, M. D., penned the lines.) 

Let us take to our hearts a lesson — no les- 
son can nobler be — 
From the ways of the tapestry weavers, 

on the other side of the sea. 
Above their heads their pattern hangs; 

they study it with care; 
And while their fingers deftly work, their 

eyes are fastened there. 
They tell this curious thing beside, of the 

patient, plodding weaver: 
He works on the wrong side evermore, 

but he works for the right side ever. 
It is only when the weaving stops, and the 

web is loosed and turned, 
That he sees his real handiwork, that his 

marvelous skill is learned. 
Oh, the sight of its delicate beauty! How 

it pays him for all it costs! 
No rarer, daintier work than his was ever 

done by the frost. 
Then his master bringeth him golden hire, 

and giveth him praise as well, 



And how happy the heart of the weaver is, 

no tongue but his own can tell. 
The years of man are the looms of God let 

down from the place of the sun, 
Whereon we are weaving always till the 

appointed task is done. 
Weaving blindly, but weaving surely, each 

man for himself his fate. 
We may not see how the right side looks, 

we can only weave and wait. 
But looking above for the pattern, no 

weaver need have fear; 
Only let him look clear into heaven — the 

Perfect Pattern is there. 
If he keep the face of the Master forever 

and always in sight, 
His weaving is sure to be perfect, his work 

is sure to be right. 
And at last when the task is ended, and the 

web is turned and shown, 
He shall hear the voice of his Master! it 

shall say unto him: "Well done!" 
And the white-winged angels of heaven to 

bear him thence shall come down; 
And God for his wage shall give him, not 

coin, but a golden crown. 



May 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



153 



What if These 60,000,000 Become Christians? 



Anetta C. Mow 



IF these sixty million people from the 
depressed classes become Christians, 
such a transformation will take place 
over India as India has never seen. When 
this lower stratum of Indian society be- 
comes leavened with the principles of 
Christianity, there will be such a mighty 
influence permeating the empire that the 
middle classes and the higher castes must 
yield to the power of the Holy Spirit and 
in time also become followers of the Christ. 
One man has summed up the situation in 
these words: "Undermine and you will get 
the whole hill." 

If these sixty million souls, who for ages 
have been no people, turn to Christianity, 
they will move to jealousy those about 
them. In educational, social and industrial 
lines, these despised and depressed classes 
will take their places and put to shame 
those who today are looking down upon 
them with caste hatred. 

If these sixty million outcastes become 
Christians it means that the Christian mis- 
sions of India will have to undertake and 
accomplish a stupendous task. The work 
of lifting downtrodden humanity to planes 
of Christian living will be the church's 
great privilege. She will need to have a 
definite schedule for thorough work. Since 
the church must accomplish more than re- 
forms, reconstruction and advancements, 
such as the aroused Arya Samaj has un- 
dertaken, she will need Spirit-filled work- 
ers, both missionary and Indian, who will 
be able to lead these peoples into that new- 
ness of life found in Jesus Christ alone. 
Every phase of civilization which follows 
in the wake of Christianity will need to be 
brought to these classes. Truly, as one 
missionary has expressed it, "To gather in 
this harvest and to train and educate the 
converts demand a far greater and more 
widespread effort than has yet been made." 

The acceptance of Christianity is the 
the first great step, but it is initial. A 
growth must follow, and that means that 
much teaching will need to be done. 
Schools will be scattered among the villag- 
es, so that boys and girls, who have spent 



the days in useless play, or in herding cat- 
tle, or in helping their parents to make a 
bare livelihood, may learn the first rudi- 
ments of education, cleanliness and moral- 
ity. 

A step further on will be the mission 
boarding school, into which the brightest 
children will come. Here their vision will 
broaden and they will begin to understand 
the value of a useful life. These children 
of the dull, ignorant outcaste will be as 
ready and alert as are the children of the 
educated Brahmin. 

During these years of study in the board- 
ing school, the life work will be chosen. 
Perhaps the path will lead through the 
English high school and university on to 
a government position; and again, the same 
course may result in a trained worker, will- 
ing to dedicate his life to Christian teach- 
ing. Perhaps the vernacular course will be 
selected, which course in reality may keep 
the student in closer touch with his own 
people. After taking normal training and 
finishing a Bible course, many will devote 
their lives to definite teaching and preach- 
ing. This result is always a joy to the 
missionary, for upon lives thus consecrated 
to the work lie the leadership and hope of 
the future church. Others may fit them- 
selves along industrial lines, learning to 
be carpenters or farmers. This in the main 
will be the educational program, but there' 
will be many side issues, each one tending 
toward the uplift of the masses. 

The general social position of these peo- 
ple will be changed. Not long will they 
remain outside the pale of respectability, 
for as Christians they will take a recog- 
nized place in society. Many of them will 
hold official positions under government. 
Some will be the teachers, at whose feet 
even the Brahmin must sit. To a far great- 
er extent than at present, this testimony of 
a Brahmin will be true. In talking to a 
missionary, a Brahmin said, " I cannot un- 
derstand your religion." " In what particu- 
lar?" the missionary inquired. He an- 
swered, " We have through the centuries 
regarded the low-caste people as untouch- 



154 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1920 



able, but missionaries mingle with them, 
start village schools among them, bring 
the brightest of them into middle and high 
schools, and before we know what is hap- 
pening we find these outcaste people as 




Educated in Christian School 

head masters and mistresses of the school 
and we Brahmins are sending our children 
to them to be educated. When we meet 
them we are compelled, because of their 
standing, to greet them as our equals, and 
when they come to our houses we give 
them the place of honor. This is the rea- 
son I cannot understand your religion." 
The missionary replied, " When you get the 
Spirit of Christ, you will understand." 
Lord Crewe, when secretary of state for 
India, said, " The kindly touch of the Chris- 
tian religion elevates the mahar at once 
and forever, socially as well as politically." 

The moral condition of these peoples will 
show wonderful transformation. It speaks 
a loud testimony to the power of Jesus 
Christ that those who have lived the lowest 
and most degraded can become changed in- 
to strong moral characters. 

And the change it will cause among these 
low castes in an industrial way, if they be- 
come Christians, cannot be counted in 
rupees and annas. To loosen these thou- 
sands from their slavery to the rich land 
owners, who compel them to work for. a 
mere pittance during the harvest seasons 
and provide no work or wage during sev- 
eral months of the year, and who charge 
an outrageous rate of interest on all debts, 
is to give release to the captive. 

When they become Christians they will 
be shown how to lift burdens of debt; will 
be taught better to withstand years of fam- 
ine, and will be instructed to provide for 



their families. And because of better living 
conditions they will be better able to with- 
stand the scourge of diseases, such as chol- 
era and plague, which always reap their 
greatest harvest in unsanitary places among 
an ignorant people, already weakened in 
body because of under-nourishment. 

Great as are the changes which will come 
to the depressed classes through education 
and social, moral and industrial uplift, they 
are but minor issues when compared to the 
new-found life in Jesus Christ. 

You may imagine what it would mean if 
these people turned to believe in Jesus as 
a loving, personal Savior and to worship 
God as a kind, loving Father after living 
in constant fear of capricious demons, 
ghosts, fierce goblins and revengeful spir- 
its. Contrast the peace and joy of your 
heart in the realization of the personal 
presence of God with that haunting fear of 
theirs when, for instance, the " people of 
the village are fever-stricken and they be- 
lieve ' a presence ' is in the neem tree at 
the end of the street. Tom-toms must be 
beaten, cocoanuts and plantains (bananas) 
must be offered, a fowl must be sacrificed, 
or better still, a sheep's head struck off at 
one blow under the tree, and then only will 
the fever cease." In this contrast you real- 
ize what it will mean if these sixty millions 
become Christians. 

There are many deep spiritual truths in 
store for these thousands when once they 




Married by Christian Preacher 

have turned to Christianity. It will re- 
quire years of earnest work, teaching and 
prayer before they come to know their 
full inheritance. Persecution awaits them. 
Those who have ruled over them, despised 






May 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



155 



and misused them, are not going to stand 
aside and calmly watch the low caste throw 
off this yoke. But by the power of him 
who calls them out of darkness they will 
be able to withstand the persecution and 
be all the stronger for it. 

With the vast majority of these people, 
Christianity is the " something better " to- 
ward which they are groping, and since 
they believe this help comes from Jesus 
Christ, they join themselves to him. Thus 
the growth begins, and slowly they will 
learn to know him better. They will begin 
to learn about his kingdom, will learn to 
love his church, will give to his cause, even 
out of their poverty, and will realize their 
own responsibility in saving others. 

A missionary who had worked among 
these low castes for eighteen years, says: 
"Though the brain and heart of the pariahs 
have been galled to a pitiable apathy by the 
social tyranny of centuries, till they seem 
covered with a callus as hard as those 



on their work-worn hands and wayworn 
feet, they are responding wonderfully to 
the touch of the Great Healer and vindicat- 
ing once again Christ's faith in the spiritual 
capacity even of the lowest of the sons of 
men." 

If these sixty millions turn to Christ, a 
mighty challenge is before the church. The 
Indian workers and the missionaries will 
need the most earnest support in money, 
men and prayer. There are many dangers 
to be avoided, many pitfalls to be shunned, 
and it will only be as the church holds on 
to God for the life of these millions that 
they will come to know the meaning of 
Christ's farewell prayer for them: 

" Father, I pray that they may all be one, 
even as thou, Father, art in me, and I in 
thee, that they also may be in us: that the 
world may believe that thou d:dst send 
me." 

Bulsar, Surat District, India. 




Worshiping in Christian Congregation 



156 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1920 




During the month of March the Board sent 142,878 
pages of tracts. 

Correction: The $50 credited to Elmer Hersch in 
the March Visitor for India Share Plan should have 
been credited to Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Hersch for 
the same purpose. 

WORLD-WIDE MISSIONS 

Pennsylvania— $210.50 

Western District, Individuals 

Linda Griffith, $5; H. L. Griffith, $8; C. 
W. Martin, $50; C. Walter Warstler, $1.50; 
Thomas Hardin and Son, $1; J. H. Lehman, 
$1; Alice A. Boddy, $5; Wilbur J. Hofeck- 

er, $2, $ 73 50 

Southern District, Individuals 

Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Martin, $2; Susie 
S. Resser, $1; A Sister (Back Creek Cong.), 
$5; William W. Leiter and wife, $20; John 

F. Sprenkle, $50, 78 00 

Middle District, Individuals 

Andrew and Susan Grines, $2; A Sister 
and her Husband, $5; Aaron Teeter, $4; 
Mrs. Hannah Puderbaugh, $3; Mary A. 

Kinsey, $10, 24 00 

Southeastern District, Congregation 

Coventry, 35 00 

Virginia— $1,419.40 

Southern District, Individual 

Anna Perrell, 20 00 

First District, Congregations 

Green Hill, $2.45; Roanoke City, $100; 
Pleasant Grove S. S., Chestnut Grove 

Cong., $4. 106 45 

Eastern District, Individuals 

B. F. A. and Edna Myers. $1.25; S. A. 
Sanger, $1.20; Lucy Figgers, $1; Alice Da- 
vis, $1, 4 45 

Second District, Individuals 
N. T. Miller, 50c; Mrs. Lucy S. Huffer, 

$1; E. C. Geiman, $10, 11 50 

Northern District, Congregation 

Timberville, 77 00 

Individuals 
S. M. Bowman (Deceased), $1,000; Mrs. 

Rebecca Shreckhise, $200, 1,200 00 

Illinois— $125.30 

Northern District, Individuals 

George W. Miller, 50c; H. A. Claybaugh, 
50c; Ivan Connell, $10; S. I. Newcomer, 
50c; Calvin Binkley, $7.80; E. Slifer, $25; 

Geo. Fisher, $5 49 30 

Southern District, Congregation 

Okaw, 15 00 

Aid Society 

Centralia, 50 00 

Individuals 
Barbara and Emmert Eshelman, $10; M. 

Flory, $1, 1100 

Indiana— $278.14 

Northern District, Congregations 
First South Bend, $9; English Prairie, 

$10.57, 19 57 

Individuals 

Clarence E. Brower, $100; Jesse Longa- 
necker and Family, $16; Receipt No. 47327, 

$50; E. M. Rowe, $1 167 00 

Southern District, Congregation 

Rossville, 3 00 

Individuals 

■ A Shut-in Sister, $1 ; Austin Hines, $50, .. 51 00 

Middle District, Sunday-school 

Class No. 8 (Salamonie), 20 40 

Individual 

B. F. France 17 17 

Ohio— $223.80 

Northeastern District, Congregation 

Jonathan Creek 50 00 

Christian Workers 



Akron 110 00 

Individuals 

Mata Brubaker, $2; D. N. Garver, $1; S. 

A. Kreiner, 50c; Friends, $28, 31 50 

Southern District, Congregation 

Cottage Grove, 12 10 

Sunday-school 

Pitsburg, 7.70 

Individuals 

A. H. Weimer, 50c; Katie Beash, $2 2 50 

Northwestern District, Congregation 

Lick Creek, 10 00 

Iowa— $590.53 

Middle District, Sunday-school 

Panther Creek, 21 06 

Southern District, Congregation 

Libertyville, 55 47 

Individuals 

M. M. Albright, $500; Elizabeth Albright, 

$5 50500 

Northern District, Individuals 

E. M. Lichty, $3; N. M. Miller, $6, 9 00 

Kansas— $47.73 

Northwestern District, Sunday-school 

Victor, 10 23 

Southwestern District, Sunday-school 

Excelsior Class (Larned), 25 00 

Individuals 

Eldorn L. Walker, $1; H. D. Michael, 50c, 1 50 

Southeastern District, Congregation 

New Hope, •••:•-. 10 00 

Northeastern District, Individual 

Mrs. Mary A. Steele, 1 00 

Michigan— $26.55 
Christian Workers 

Woodland, 10 55 

Individuals 

Harriet C. Lowder, $2; Mr. and Mrs. E. 
G. Sellers, $10; E. J. Neher, $1; Perry Mc- 

Kimmy, $3, 16 00 

Missouri— $13.26 

Middle District, Sunday-school 

Happy Hill, 3 26 

Individuals 

J. P. Harris and Wife, 10 00 

Tennessee— $9.00 

Individuals 

Mary M. Reed, $2; Mrs. Salina Pence, $2; 

Mrs. T. A. Mooney, $5, 9 00 

South Dakota— $18.00 
Individual 

D. R. Baldwin, 18 00 

North Dakota— $5.50 
Individuals 

G. A. Stevens, 50c; S. M. Clapper, $5, .... 5 50 

Wisconsin — $4.00 

Individuals 

Sarah Wilson, $1; Mrs. Charles D. Pul- 

ford, $3, 4 00 

Oklahoma— $43.51 
Sunday-school 

Washita, ■. 16 51 

Individuals 

Mrs. B. F. Carter, $2; J. E. Young and 

Family, $25, 27 00 

California— $15.13 

Northern District, Congregation 

Waterford, '. 15 13 

Maryland— $0.50 

Eastern District, Individual 

' Wm. E. Roop (Mar. Not.) 50 

West Virginia— $5.00 
Second District, Individuals 

C. W. Obrien and Wife 5 00 

Delaware — $7.00 
Individual 

Helen Biddle 7 00 



May 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



157 



New Jersey— $2.50 
Individual 
Louisa Burris 2 50 

Total for the month, $ 3,045 35 

. INDIA MISSIONS 
Illinois— $5.00 

Northern District, Individuals 

J. Edwin Jarboe and Wife, 5 00 

Nebraska— $23.95 
Congregation 

South Beatrice 23 95 

Iowa— $5.00 

Middle District, Individual 

Sarah Fike, 5 00 

Pennsylvania— $109.00 
Eastern District, Individual 

Oscar Kratz 9 00 

Southeastern District, Individual 

A Thank Offering from a Friend, 100 00 

Oregon— $10.00 
Individuals 

A. E. Troyer and Wife, 10 00 

Virginia— $0.37 

First District, Congregation 

Green Hill, 37 

Total for the month, $ 153 32 

INDIA BOARDING SCHOOL 

Pennsylvania— $343.82 

Southern District, Congregation 

First Church, York 10 00 

Sunday-schools 

York, $57; Sunbeam Class, Carlisle, $6.25, 63 25 

Aid Society 

Carlisle, 16 00 

Individuals 

D. R. Hedding and Wife, 70 00 

Western District, Sunday-schools 

True Blue Class, Meyersdale. $25; Class 
No. 3, Locust Grove. $9.20; Class No. 1, 
Locust Grove, $1; Class No. 2, Locust 
Grove, $12.62; Class No. 4, Locust Grove, 

$28, 75 82 

Southeastern District, Sunday-school 

Parkerford 15 00 

Christian Workers 

Parkerford, 15 00 

Eastern District, Sunday-schools 

Quakertown, $35; Other Folks' Class, Hat- 

field,$8.75, 43 75 

Individuals 

Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Hinkle, 35 00 

Indiana— $267.50 

Middle District, Sunday-schools 

Denver, $3$; N. Manchester. Children's 
Division, $35; Class No. 18. Flora. $35; Mis- 
sionary Class, Mexico, $17.50; Class No. 
6, Salamonie. $6.25; Class No. 7. Salamonie, 
$6.25; Class No. 5. Salamonie, $25; Younc 

People's Class, Peru, $35, 195 00 

Aid Society 

N. Manchester, 10 00 

Northern District, Sunday-schools 

Class No. 7, Goshen. $7.50; Primary De- 
partment, Walnut, $21.25 28 75 

Aid Society 

New Salem 25 00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Arcadia 8 75 

Ohio— $156.25 

Northwestern District, Sunday-schools 

Mrs. Sheffer's Class. $35; Gleaners' Class, 
Marion, $35; Willing Workers, Marion, $35, 105 00 
Individuals 

Eohraim Yoder, $8.75; Mr. Pearl Rhine, 

$17.50 26 25 

Northeastern District, Sunday-school 

Springfield, 25 00 

Kansas— $85.50 

Southwestern District, Sunday-school 

Eden Valley 35 00 

Christian Workers 

Newton City 9 25 

Southeastern District, Sunday-school 



Loyal Workers' Class, Parsons 6 25 

Northeastern District, Individual 

W. H. Yoder 35 00 

Iowa — $40.00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

S. Keokuk, 5 00 

Aid Society 

Liberty ville, 15 00 

Northern District, Individual 

Mary S. Newson 20 00 

Maryland— $25.00 

Eastern District, Sunday-school 

Pipe Creek 25 00 

Missouri — $70.00 

Northern District, Individual 

George A. Miller, 35 00 

Middle District, Individual 

Sudie Hoover, 35 00 

Virginia— $17.50 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Truth Seekers' Class, Timberville, 17 5Q 

Michigan — $9.00 
Individual 

Morris Weisel, 9 00 

California — $42.00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Class No. 9, First Church, Los Angeles, 42 00 

Minnesota — $25.00 
Christian Workers 

Lewiston, 25 0G 

Colorado— $25.00 

Southeastern District, Sunday-school 

Bible Class, Wiley, .'. 25 00 

Total for the month $ 1,106 57 

ANKLESVAR GIRLS' BOARDING SCHOOL 
BUILDING 
Pennsylvania— $70.00 

Southeastern District, Aid Societies 

Geiger Memorial. $5; Amwell, $2.50; Har- 
monyville, $2.50; Wilmington, $2.50; Potts- 
town, $2.50; Brooklyn, $2.50; Upper Dublin, 
$2.50; Norristown, $12.50; Royersford, $2.50; 

Green Tree. $25 65 00 

Western District, Aid Society 

Penn Run 5 00 

Maryland— $113.83 

Middle District, Aid Societies 

Brownsville, $25; W. Hagerstown. $10; 
W. Brownsville. $8; Broadfording, $22.50; 
Berkley, $8.33; Manor, $20; Hagerstown, $20, 113 83 
California— $13.50 
Southern District, Aid Societies 

Egan. $10; Herman Beach Mission, $1; 

Boyle Heights Mission, $2.50, 13 50 

Ohio— $229.25 

Northeastern District, Aid Societies 

Black River, $25; Owl Creek, $15 40 00 

Northwestern District, Aid Society 

Black Swamp, 10 00 

Southern District Aid Societies, 179 25 

Illinois— $29.80 

Southern District, Aid Society 

Virden, 13 00 

Northern District Aid Societies, 16 80 

Virginia — $25.13 

Eastern District, Aid Societies 

Nokesville. $16.67; Fairfax, $9.46, 25 13 

Kansas— $25.00 

Southwestern District. Aid Society 

Newton 15 00 

Northeastern District Aid Societies, 10 00 

Oregon— $5.00 
Aid Society 

Portland, 5 00 

Total for the month, $ 511 51 

INDIA SHARE PLAN 
Illinois— $100.00 

Southern District, Individuals 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Hersch 50 00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Cherry Grove, 50 00 



158 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1920 



Ohio— $75.00 

Southern District, Individual 

N. D. Groff, ..... 25 00 

Northwestern District 

Canton S. S. and C. W., 50 00 

North Dakota— $50.00 
Individuals 

Joseph Reish and Wife, 50 00 

Indiana— $25.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Anchor Class, Oak Grove 25 00 

Oregon— $5.00 
Sunday-school 

Newberg, 5 00 

Missouri— $50.00 

Northern District, Individual 

Geo. A. Miller, 50 00 

New Mexico— $65.42 
Individual 

Chester A. Brunk, 50 00 

Christian Workers 

Clovis 15 42 

West Virginia— $12.50 

Second District, Sunday-school 

Beans Chapel, 12 50 

Iowa— $10.00 

Northern District, Individual 

M. L. Kimmel, 10 00 

Michigan— $12.50 
Individuals 

Dr. and Mrs. C. M. Mote, 12 50 

Nebraska— $3.11 
Sunday-school 

Alvo, 3 11 

Total for the month, $ 408 53 

INDIA NATIVE WORKER 
Indiana — $75.00 

Middle District, 

Mission Sewing Circle, N. Manchester, .. 75 00 

South Dakota— $12.50 
Sunday-school 

Willow Creek, 12 50 

Minnesota— $80.00 
Sunday-school 

Root River, 80 00 

California— $20.00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Gleaners' Class, Los Angeles, 20 00 

Ohio— $15.00 

Southern District, Sunday-school 

Greenville, 15 00 

Maryland — $5.00 

Eas+ern District, Sunday-school 

Edgewood 5 00 

Total for the month, $ 207 50 

INDIA FAMINE RELIEF 
Kansas — $5.00 

Southwestern District, Individual 

( Mrs. A. C. Weiser, 5 00 

Pennsylvania— $3.00 
Southern District. Individual 

A Sister, Lost Creek Cong., 3 00 

Arizona — $3.85 
Individual 

B. F. Glick, 3 85 

M'*chiffan— $2.00 
Individual 

Mrs. Harriet Lowder, 2 00 

North Carolina— $8.00 
Individual 

Miss Ellie Nolen, 8 00 

Total for the month, $ 2185 

INDIA WIDOWS' HOME 
California— $5.00 

Southern District, Aid Society 
Egan, 5 00 

Ohio— $50.00 v 



Northeastern District, Aid Society 
Black River, 50 00 

Total for the month, $ 55 00 

QUINTER MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 
Nebraska— $49.50 • 

Mrs. M. J. Kanost, 49 50 

California— $9.75 

Southern District, Aid Societies 

Glendora, $5; Egan, $4.75, 9 75 

Total for the month $ 59 25 

VADA AUTO FUND 
Pennsylvania— $600.00 

Southern District Sunday-schools, 600 00 

Maryland— $65.60 

Eastern District, Congregations 
Beaver Dam and Union Bridge, 65 60 

Total for the month, $ 665 60 

CHINA MISSION 
Ohio— $55.50 

Northeastern District, Individuals 

A Brother and Sister, Black River Cong., 

$50; Simon and Sarah Eshelman, $5.50 55 50 

Illinois— $5.00 

Northern District, Individuals 

J. Edwin Jarboe and Wife 5 00 

Pennsylvania — $5.00 

Middle District, Individuals 

A Sister and her Husband, 5 00 

Virginia— $0.05 

First District, Congregation 

Green Hill, 05 

Total for the month, $ 65 55 

PING TING HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 
BUILDING 
Pennsylvania— $70.00 

Southeastern District, Aid Societies 

Geiger Memorial, $5; Brooklyn, $2.50; 
Pottstown, $2.50; Wilmington, $2.50; Har- 
monyville, $2.50; Amwell. $2 50; Upper Dub- 
lin, $7.50; Norristown, $12.50; Royersford, 

$2.50; Green Tree, $25 65 00 

Western District, Aid Society 

Penn Run, 5 00 

Maryland— $113.83 

Middle District, Aid Societies 

Brownsville, $25; W. Hagerstown, $10; 
W. Brownsville, $8; Broadfording, $22.50; 
Berkley, $8.33; Manor, $20; Hagerstown, $20, 113 83 
Virginia— $24.46 
Eastern District, Aid Societies 

Nokesville, $16; Fairfax, $8.46, 24 46 

California— $3.50 

Southern District, Aid Societies 

Boyle Heights Mission, $2.50; Hermosa 

Beach Mission, $1, 3 50 

Ohio— $204.25 

Southern District Aid Societies 179 25 

Northeastern District, Aid Society 

Black River, 25 00 

Illinois— $30 05 

Southern District, Aid Society 

Virden, 13 25 

Northern District Aid Societies, 16 80 

Oregon — $5.00 
Aid Society 

Portland, 5 00 

Kansas— $10 00 

Northeastern District Aid Societies, 10 00 

Total for the month, ; $ 46109 

CHINA NATIVE WORKER 
Ohio— $89.00 
Northwestern District, Congregation 

Baker, 14 00 

Sunday-school 

Men's Bible Class, Sugar Creek, 75 00 

Virginia— $75.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Class No. 3, Greenmount; 75 00 



May 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



159 



Indiana— $86.25 

Middle District, Christian Workers 

Markle 18 75 

Aid Society 

N. Manchester, 37 50 

Sunday-school 

Elite Class, Nappanee, 30 00 

Michigan— $40.72 
Sunday-school 

Sugar Ridge, 20 72 

Christian Workers 

Elmdale, 20 00 

Iowa — $9.58 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Greene, 9 58 

Alabama— $6.38 
Sunday-schools 

Fruitdale and Cedar Creek 6 38 

Total for the month, $ 306 93 

PING TING HOSPITAL 
Ohio— $4.00 

Northeastern District, Individual 

The Lord's share of a young Sister's 

earnings, 4 00 

California — $30.00 

Southern District, Aid Society 

Glendora 5 00 

Sunday-school 

Primary Department, Long Beach, 25 00 

Maryland— $10.00 

Eastern District, Individual 

Miss Mary Weybright, 10 00 

Virginia— $23.42 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

Classes 4, 6 and 7, Greenmount, 23 42 

Total for the month, $ 67 42 

LIAO CHOU HOSPITAL 
Maryland— $10.00 

Eastern District, Individual 

Miss Mary Weybright 10 00 

Ohio— $15.00 

Southern District, Aid -Society 

Ft. McKinley, 15 00 

California— $5.00 

Southern District, Individual 

A Sister, 5 00 

Total for the month, $ 30 00 

CHINA BOYS' SCHOOL 
Ohio— $37.00 

Northeastern District, Sunday-school 

Springfield, 25 00 

Southern District. Individual 

Mrs. Harvey Mote, 22 00 

Total for the month, $ 47 00 

CHINA GIRLS' SCHOOL 
Nebraska— $7.50 

Individuals 

Ruth Miller and Gladys Neuman, 7 50 

Indiana — $5.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school 

English Prairie, 5 00 

Total for the month t $ 12 50 

LIAO CHOU GIRLS' SCHOOL BUILDING 
Iowa— $800.00 

Northern District, Individual 
Eliza Switzer, 800 00 

Total for the month $ 800 00 

HOME MISSIONS 
Ohio— $25.00 

District of Northwestern Ohio 25 00 

Total for the month, $ 25 00 



RELIEF AND RECONSTRUCTION 
REPORT FOR MARCH, 1920 
ARMENIAN AND SYRIAN RELIEF 
Arizona 

Glendale Cong., $ 137 97 

Arkansas 

M. A. Whitcher, Austin, 10 00 

California 

Mrs. A. M. White, Empire, $100; Mr. and 
Mrs. Wm. C. Halsey, Richmond, $25; Boyle 
Heights Mission, Los Angeles, $53.26; Boyle 
Heights S. S., Los Angeles, $3.19; Tropico 
Church, $10; La Verne Cong., $413.51; Ed- 
mund Taylor, La Verne Cong., $150; M. 
M. and Saloma Eshelman, Glendale, $5; 
Pasadena Church, $157; Long Beach Ch., 
$82; McFarland Cong., $65.78; D. E. Lyon, 

Casmalia, $1, 1,065 74 

Colorado 

Rocky Ford Church, $146.45; Rocky Ford 

S. S., $98.60; Sterling Church, $43.75, 288 80 

Idaho 

A Brother and Sister, Caldwell, $30; Wei- 

ser Church, $31.73, 61 7-3 

Illinois 

Dixon Church, $53; A Sister, Shannon, $5; 
C. J. Sell, Joliet, $10; Mrs. Fanny Gibble, 
Girard, $4; C. W. Lahman, Franklin Grove, 
$320; Centennial Aid Society, Hammond, 

$50; Mrs. Susan Kesler, Marengo, $5, 447 00 

Indiana 

Goshen City S. S., $152; Goshen City Ch. 
Aid Society, One Orphan for one year, $60; 
Elkhart S. S., $25; John W. Root and Wife, 
La Fayette, $10; D; K. Hardman, Warren, 
$5; Floyd McGuire, Indianapolis, $5; Levi 
Zumbrun, Columbia City, $25; J. L. and 
Ida Cunningham, Flora, $5; Mrs. Vinia 
Maharney, Ladoga, $1; S. C. Perkins and 
Family, Hudson, $37; Cedar Lake Church, 
$55.80; Turkey Creek S. S., Milford, $10; S. 
S. in Northern part of Cedar Lake District, 
$10; Baugo Cong., $140; Missionary Class, 
Mexico, $10; Pine Creek Cong., $25; Auburn 
S. S., $30; Primary Class, North Liberty 
S. S., $2; Spring Creek Church, $252.50; 
Wakarusa S. S., $25; Upper Deer Creek 
Church, $1.75; Elkhart City Church, $5; 
West Branch S. S., Pine Creek District, 
$51.36; English Prairie Cong., $17.94; Ogans 
Creek Cong., $10; Pipe Creek Ch., $314.30; 
Beginner H. D. Birthday Offering of Fair- 
view S. S., $1.11; Cedar Creek S. S. and Ch., 

$15.13; Bachelor Run S. S., $103, 1,404 89 

Iowa 

F. H. Heieman, Richland, $10; Grundy 
County Cong., $10; W. I. Buckingham, 
Hampton, $25; Sister Lydia Ommen, Guth- 
rie Center, $10; Greene S. S., $50; Sisters' 
Aid Society, Dallas Center, $25; Dallas Cen- 
ter S. S., $125.88, 255 88 

Kansas 

Johanna Jolitz, Talmage, $10; Garden City 
Church, $25; Topeka Church, $20; Brother 
and Sister J. E. Ott, Ottawa, $3; Pleasant 
View Church, $66.08; Armourdale Mission, 
Kansas City, $1.25; Nellie Albin, Norcatur, 
$6; Mrs. Alice Vaniman, McPherson, $5, .. 136 33 
Maryland 

Wm. E. Gosnell and Wife, Mt. Airy, $5; 
Mrs. J. E. Rowland, Maugansville, $10; 
Mrs. A. W. Ecker, Woodsboro, $10; Jesse 
C. Merrill and Wife, Lonaconing, $10; W. 
A. Spiker, Accident, $2; Peach Blossom 

Church, $2, 39 00 

Michigan 

E. T. Neher, Grand Rapids, $2; Grand 
Rapids S. S., $5; A Sister, Nashville, $2, . . 9 00 

Minnesota 

Harvey and Anna Long, Faribault, 5 00 

Missouri 

Lizzie Fahnestock, Montrose, 5 00 

Nebraska 

D. E. Phillips, Red Cloud, $5; Mrs. Al- 
fred Phillips, Red Cloud, $5, 10 00 



160 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1920 



Ohio 

Ida Helm, Ashland, $1; A Brother and 
Sister of Black River Cong., $50; Spring- 
field S. S., $43.30; Helpers' Class No. 5, 
Wooster Church, $5; Wooster Church, 
$67.65; Sisters' Aid Society of Owl Creek 
Church, $50; Pleasant Hill Church, $71; 
Isaac Miller and Wife, Beaverdam, $10; 
Zion S. S., $2.24; Mohican Church, $10.80; 
W. D. F., Lick Creek Cong., $5; J. H. Root, 
Catharine Wohlgamuth, Burbank, $20; Mrs. 
Brookville, $10; W. T. Hoover, Brookville, 
$5; Roy Mellekin, Brookville, $5; Effie 
Diehl, Brookville, $1; Parker Cain, Brook- 
ville, $5; Tom Dillon, Brookville, $5, 366 99 

Oklahoma 

Ed. R. Herndon, Weatherford, 100 00 

Oregon 

Portland Church, $170; Mrs. W. A. Lett, 
Bridge, $10 180 00 

Pennsylvania 

Caroline Meyers, Friedens, $10; Miss Liz- 
zie Replogle, Hollidaysburg, $10; Mrs. 
Katharine R. Hawn, Hollidaysburg, $5; 
Rosie S. Myers, Martinsburg, $5; Red Bank 
Church, $17.35; Williamsburg C. W., $10; 
Williamsburg S. S., $23.18; Norristown S. 
S., $5; First Church, Philadelphia, $100; 
Parker Ford Church, $100; Rummel S. S., 
$115; Curry House, in Woodbury Cong., 
$127.15; Martinsburg S. S., $65.38; Johns- 
town Cong., $49.50; Lost Creek Cong., $13; 
Shrewsbury S. S., $20; New Freedom S. S. 
of Codorus Cong., $20; Missionary Society, 
Clover Creek Church, $25; A Sister of Lost 
Creek Cong., $3; Claar Church, $72; Cone- 
wago Cong., $3; Shippensburg S. S., $3; 
Everett Cong., $105.70; A Sister, Elizabeth- 
town, $10; A Sister, Somerset, $10; Mrs. 
Hannah Puderbaugh, Martinsburg, $3; 
Mrs. S. B. Roop, Waynesboro, $5; Spring 
Creek S. S., Spring Creek Church, $100; 
Lebanon S. S., Midway Church, $123; Mid- 
way S. S., $293.31; Richland Church, $370; 
Heidelsberg S. S., $30.06; Eastville S. S., 
Sugar Valley Cong., $50; Hollidaysburg 
Cong., $32.50; Indian Creek Church (A 
Brother and Sister), $5; Queen Church, $7; 
Brothers Valley Cong., $201.04; Francis 
Baker, Everett, $20; Leamersville S. S., 
$108.22; F. B. Myers, Mt. Pleasant, $3; Nor- 
ristown S. S., $13.32; Upper Cumberland 
Cong., $72.15; Huntsdale S. S., Upper Cum- 
berland Cong., $141.95; Meyer sdale S. S., 
$10.17; Meyersdale Church, $117.33; Antie- 
tam Cong., $152.65; Marsh Creek Church, 
$5.50; Carson Valley S. S., $30; Williams- 
burg, Men's O. A. B. Class, $10; Williams- 
burg Temperance Committee, $3.20, 2,834 66 

Virginia 

Mrs. Isaac Hooker, Buffalo Ridge, $10; 
Unity Aid Society of Unity Cong., $60; 
Christiansburg Cong., $14.85; D. C. Cline, 
Grottoes, $20; Lower Union S. S., $20; 
Sangerville Cong., $10; S. S.'s of Unity 
Cong., No. Va., $145.25; Chestnut Grove 
Cong., Pleasant View S. S., $15.21; Mrs. 
Byrd S. Manuel, Nokesville, $3; Mrs. G. R. 
Campbell, Winchester, $2; Bridgewater 
Cong., $225.04; Sangerville Cong., $108; Jos. 
S. Wine and Wife, Falls Church, $31; Roa- 
noke Church, $21.90; E. C. Geiman, Crim- 
ora, $5; Fairview S. S., Unity Cong., $66; 
W. H. Quesenberry, East Va., $6 763 25 

Washington 

A Friend, Seattle, $10; Forest Center S. 
S., $20.45, 30 45 

West Virginia 

Beaver Run Cong 37 51 

Wisconsin 

Mrs. Chas. D. Pulford, Milwaukee, 5 00 

Unknown, 2 00 

Total for month of March, $ 8,196 20 



FRENCH ORPHAN RELIEF FOR MARCH 
Minnesota 

Loyal Class of Nemadji, Barnum, 9 00 

Total for month of March, $ 9 00 

SERBIAN RELIEF FOR MARCH 
Pennsylvania 

Sister Ida K. B. Hetric, Royersford, $25; 
Mrs. S. B. Roop, Waynesboro, $5 30 00 

Total for month of March, .$ 30 00 

THE FATHER'S REGARD 

John M. Roller 
Across the street, in a mansion snug and 

warm, 
A child lay sick in fever and in pain; 
'Twas one the father dearly loved, and 

wished 
That he his heir should be to treasures 

great. 
When called, the doctor came with laws of 

science, 
The nurse stood by with hands and heart 

of love, 
The neighbors from across the street, were 

moved, 
And sent regards, and prayed for the strick- 
en one. 
Meanwhile the child to health was again 

restored, 
And the father's heart was with rejoicing 

filled. 
Across the sea, in a cabin low and dim, 
A child lay sick in fever and in pain; 
'Twas one of those the Father dearly loved, 
And for his life great blessings he had 

planned. 
Alas, no doctor came with law of science. 
No nurse stood by with hands and heart of 

love, 
No neighbors from across the sea, were 

moved 
To send relief in substance or in prayers. 
Meanwhile the child's brief life had passed 

away, 
And one more grave was added to the list 
Of those, of whom it may be said: "Alas. 
It might have been," and the Father's heart 

was grieved. 
To him, who holds the world within his 

hand, 
Shall we not give our means, our time, our 

all? 
Then 'twill be done; to fields of ripened 

grain 
H'll lead .us forth, the precious sheaves to 

reap; 
And then in him triumphant we shall be, 
While all shall know the riches of his grace. 

An African missionary, in speaking of 
the Christians in Africa, said he wished the 
Mohammedans were as nominally Moham- 
medans as Christians were nominally 
Christians. 






QEINERAL MISSION BOARD 



ITS MEMBERSHIP 



D. L. MILLER, Mt. Morris, 111., Life Advis- 
ory Member. I 
H. C. EARLY, Penn Laird, Va. 
OTHO WINGER, North Manchester, Ind. 



CHAS. D. BONSACK, New Windsor, Md. 

General Director Forward Movement. 
J. J. YODER, McPherson, Kansas. 
A. P. BLOUGH, Waterloo, Iowa. 



ITS ORGANIZATION 



H. C. EARLY, President. 
OTHO WINGER, Vice-President. 
J. H. B. WILLIAMS, Secretary-Treasurei 
Editor, the Visitor. 



H. SPENSER MINNICH, Missionary Educa- 
tional Secretary. 
M. R. ZIGLER, Home Mission Secretary. 
CLYDE M. CULP, Financial Secretary. 



All correspondence for the Board should be addressed to Elgin, Illinois 

ITS FORCE OF FOREIGN WORKERS 



DENMARK 

Villa Pax, Koldby, Pr. 
Hordum 

Glasmire, W. E. 

Glasmire, Leah S. 



SWEDEN 

Friisgatan No. 1, 
Mai mo, Sweden 

Buckingham, Ida 
Graybifi, T. F. 
Graybill, Alice M. 

CHINA 

Ping Ting Hsien, 
Shansi, China 

Bowman, Samuel B. 

Bowman, Pearl S. 

Bright, f. Homer 

Bright, Minnie F. 

Crumpacker, F. H. 

Crumpacker, Anna M. 

Flory, Edna R. 

Horning, Emma 

Metzger, Minerva 

Rider, Bessie M. 

Wampler, Dr. Fred J. 

Wampler, Rebecca C. 

North China 
Language School, 
Pekin, China 

Horning, Dr. D. L. 
Horning, Martha Daggett 
Miller, Valley 
Myers, Minor M. 
Myers, Elizabeth Z. 
Shock, Laura J. 
Sollenberger, O. C. 
Sollenberger, Hazel Cop- 
pock 
Ullom, Lulu 

Liao Chou, Shansi, China 
Brubaker, Dr. O. G. 
Brubaker, Cora M. 
Cripe, Winnie E. 
Flory, Raymond C. 
Flory, Lizzie N. 
Hutchison, Anna 
Oberholtzer, I. E. 
Oberholtzer. Elizabeth W. 
Pollock, Myrtle 
Seese, Norman A. 
Seese, Anna 
Senger, Nettie M. 
Wampler, Ernest M. 
Wampler, Vida M. 



Shou Yang, Shansi, China 

Clapper, V. Grace 
Flory, Byron M. 
Flory, Nora 
Heisey, Walter J. 
Heisey, Sue R. 
Schaeffer, Mary 

On Furlough 

Blough, Anna V., 266 
Hammond Ave., Wa- 
terloo, la. 

Vaniman, Ernest D., La 
Verne, Calif. 

Vaniman, Susie C, La 
Verne, Calif. 

INDIA 

Ahwa, Dangs Forest, 
via Bilimora, India 

Ebey, Adam 

Ebey, Alice K. 

Anklesvar, Broach Dist., 
India 

Arnold, S. Ira 

Arnold, Elizabeth 

Lichty, D. J. 

Miller, Eliza B. 

Mow, Anetta 

Ziegler, Kathryn 

Bulsar, Surat Dist., India 

Blickenstaff, Verna M. 
Brown, Nettie P. 
Brumbaugh, Anna B. 
Butterbaugh, Andrew G. 
Butterbaugh, Bertha L. 
Eby, E. H. 
Eby, Emma H. 
Hoffert, A. T. 
Hollenberg, Fred M. 
Hollenberg, Nora R. 
Kintner, Elizabeth 
Miller, A. S. B. 
Miller, Jennie B. 
Miller, Sadie J. 
Mohler, Jennie 
Replogle, Sara G. 
Ross, A. W. 
Ross, Flora N. 
Shull, Chalmer G. 
Shull, Mary S. 
Summer, Benjamin F. 
Wagoner, J. Elmer 
Wagoner, Ellen H. 

Dahanu, Thana Dist., India 

Alley, Howard I. 
Alley, Hattie Z. 



Ebbert, Ella 

Nickey, Dr. Barbara M. 



Jalalpor, Surat Dist., India 



Forney, D. L. 
Forney, Anna M. 
Grisso, Lillian 
Shumaker, Ida C. 



Vada, Thana Dist., India 

Garner, H. P. 
Garner, Kathryn B. 
Powell, Josephine 



Post: Urn alia, vim 
Anklesvar, India 

Himmelsbaugh, Ida 
Holsopple, Q. A. 
Holsopple, Kathren R. 



Vyara, via Surat, India 

Long, I. S. 
Long, Effie V. 



On Furlough 

Blough, J. M., Hunting- 
don, Pa. 

Blough, Anna Z., Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa. 

Cottrell, Dr. A. R., North 
Manchester, Ind. 

Cottrell, Dr. Laura M., 
N. Manchester, Ind. 

Eby, Anna M., Trotwood, 
Ohio 

Emmert, Jesse B., Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa. 

Emmert, Gertrude R., 
Huntingdon, Pa. 

Kaylor, John I., La Verne, 
Calif. 

Pittenger, J. M., Grants- 
ville, Md. 

Pittenger, Florence B., 
Grantsville, Md. 

Royer, B. Mary, Richland, 
Pa. 

Stover, W. B. Mt. Morris, 
111. 

Stover, Mary E., Mt. 
Morris, 111. 

Swartz, Goldie, Ashland, 
Ohio. 

Widdowson, Olive, Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa. 



Please Notice — Postage on letters to our missionaries is 5c lor each ounce or fraction 
(hereof and 3c for each additional ounce or fraction. 



u 



BRIDGEWATER 



COLLEGE LIBRARY 



BR1DGEWATER, VIRGINIA 



[liHIIIH^ 

| "Lift Up Your Heads" I 
O Ye Christians 1 

Lift them high enough that you may j 
get a world-view of a world-wide field | 



i 



M 



This is what the 

Forward Movement 

of the Church of the Brethren 

1 Is endeavoring to bring to you. 

§§ 

I The Master 9 s Command to His 

Followers is to "Go Forward." 

i 

FORWARD to a deeper Spiritual life 
FORWARD to an effectual Prayer life 
FORWARD in every Spiritual resource 
FORWARD in Stewardship— Stewardship 

of life, of ability, of influence 

and possessions. 
FORWARD in Evangelism in the home 

fields. 
FORWARD in the Great Fields over seas. 
FORWARD until he says, "It is enough.' ' 



I 



i 



1 



To this program the Forward Movement is 

committed by the sacred vow of service. 

= 1 

| THE FORWARD MOVEMENT | 

| Church of the Brethren | 

| ELGIN - - - - - ILLINOIS | 

lililiilliililJilliillllllllillllllllllllllllM 



THE MISSIONARY 




Chuvcti^oMrhe ^Brethren 




MOTHER— The Missionaries' Inspiration 



This Group of mothers of our missionaries were present during the 1919 Winona Lake 
Conference. Some of them at that time saw their children approved for mission 
service. Others had experienced this before. Like Hannah, they have dedicated their 
best to the service of him whom they have themselves long served. 

What could not the Church of the Brethren accomplish for God if she were blessed 
with a generation of mothers like these! 



Vol. XXII 



JUNE, 1920 



. xmmsm 



No. 6 



mm* ■ 



The Missionary Visitor 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN 
THROUGH HER GENERAL MISSION BOARD 



Subscription Terms 



THE SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IS ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR 

The subscription price is included in EACH donation of two dollars or more to the Gen- 
eral Mission Board, either direct or through any congregational collection, provided the 
two dollars or more are given by one individual and in no way combined with another's gift. 
Different members of the same family may each give two dollars or more, and extra sub-. 
Bcriptions, thus secured, may upon request be sent to persons who they know will be in- 
terested in reading the Visitor. 

Kindly notice, however, that these subscription terms do not include a subscription for 
every two dollar donation, but a subscription for each donation of two dollars or more, no 
matter how large the donation. 

Ministers. In consideration of their services to the church, influence in assisting the 
Committee to raise missionary money, and upon their request annually, the Visitor will 
be sent to ministers of the Church of the Brethren. 

Foreign postage, 15 cents additional to all foreign countries, including Canada. Sub- 
scriptions discontinued at expiration of time. 

To insure delivery of paper, prompt notice of change of address should be given. When 
asking change of address give old address as well as new. Please order paper each year 
if possible under the same name as in the previous year. 

Address all communications regarding subscriptions and make remittances payable to 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, ILLINOIS 

Entered as second class matter at the postofhce of Elgin, Illinois. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, Act of 
October 3, 1917, authorized Aug. 20, 1918. 



Contents for June, 1920 

THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT— 

Our Missionary Force, 3 

With Our Missionaries, 5 

Supports of Missionaries, 6 

Financial, 8 

The Volunteers, 10 

The Forward Movement, .10 

Missionary Education, 11 

District Missionary Secretaries, 11 

Reports from Our Fields: 

Sweden, 12 

Denmark 14 

India 15 

Ahwa (16), Anklesvar (20). Bulsar (27), Dahaiut (35), Jalalpor 
(39), Yada (42), Yvara (43), India Mission Statistical Report 
for 1919 (45). 

China 49 

Ping Ting (49), Liao Chou (55). Shon Yang (62), Annual Sta- 
tistical Report. 1919 (66). 

Financial — the Various Funds, 68 

GISH PUBLISHING FUND, 90 

FINANCIAL REPORT FOR APRIL 91 



The Thirty-Fifth 

ANNUAL REPORT 



of th< 



General Mission Board 

of the 

Church of the Brethren 



For the Year Ending 

Feb. 29, 1920 




Published by the General Mission Board, Elgin, Illinois 
For distribution free to all who are interested 



General Mission Board 

of the 

Church of the Brethren 

D. L. Miller/ Mt. Morris, Illinois 

Life Advisory Member 

A. P. Blough, Waterloo, Iowa 

Term expires 1924 

Otho Winger, North Manchester, Indiana 

Term expires 1923 

Chas. D. Bonsack, New Windsor, Maryland 

Term expires 1922 

J. J. Yoder, McPherson, Kansas 

Term expires 1921 

H. C. Early, Penn Laird, Virginia 

Term expires 1920 

ITS ORGANIZATION 

President, H. C. Early, Penn Laird, Virginia 

Vice-President, Otho Winger 
North Manchester, Indiana 

Sec.-Treas., J. H. B. Williams, Elgin, Illinois 
Editor, the Visitor 

Missionary Educational Sec, H. Spenser Minnich 
Elgin, Illinois 

Home Mission Secretary, M. R. Zigler 
Elgin, Illinois 

Financial Secretary, Clyde M. Gulp 
Elgin, Illinois 

Office of the Board, Elgin, 111. Time of Annual 
Meeting, third Wednesday in August. Other regular 
meetings, third Wednesday of April and December 
and at Annual Conference. 

To insure prompt attention, all correspondence rela- 
tive to mission work, or any activities of the Board, 
that is intended for the Board, should be addressed to 
General Mission Board, Elgin, 111., and to no individual. 



Annual Report 



Our Missionary Force 

Below may be found a list of the missionaries who are at present serving under 
direction of the General Mission Board, with present addresses, and date of entering 
service: 



DENMARK 
Villa Pax, Koldby, Pr. Hordum 
Glasmire, W. E 



1919 
1919 



Glasmire, Leah S., 

SWEDEN 
Frusgatan No. 1, Malmo, Sweden 

Graybill, J. F., 1911 

Graybill, Alice M., 1911 

On Furlough 
Cerro Gordo, 111. 
Buckingham, Ida, 1913 

' . CHINA 

Ping Ting Hsien, Shansi, China 

Bowman, Samuel B., 1918 

Bowman, Pearl S., 1918 

Bright, J. Homer, 1911 

Bright, Minnie F., 1911 

Crumpacker, F. H., 1908 

Crumpacker, Anna M., 1908 

Flory, Edna R.,. 1917 

Horning, Emma 1908 

Metzger, Minerva, 1910 

Rider, Bessie M 1916 

Wampler, Dr. Fred T., 1913 

Wafnpler, Rebecca C., 1913 

North China Language School 

Pekin, China 

Horning, Dr. D. L 1919 

Horning, Martha Daggett, 1919 

Miller, Valley, 1919 

Myers, Minor M., 1919 

Myers, Elizabeth Z., 1919 

Shock, Laura J., 1916 

Sollenberger, O. C, 1919 

Sollenberger, Hazel Coppock 1919 

Ullom, Lulu, 1919 

Liao Chou, Shansi, China 

Cripe, Winnie E 1911 

Flory, Raymond C., 1914 

Flory, Lizzie N., 1914 

Hutchison, Anna 1913 

Oberholtzer, I. E., 1916 

Oberholtzer, Elizabeth W., 1916 

Pollock, Myrtle, 1917 

Seese, Norman A., 1917 

Seese, Anna, 1917 

Senger, Nettie M 1916 

Wampler, Ernest M., 1918 

Wampler, Vida M., 1918 

Shou Yang, Shansi, China 

Clapper, V. Grace 1917 

Flory, Byron M„ /....... 1917 



Flory, Nora, 1917 

Heisey, Walter J., 1917 

Heisey, Sue R., ? .... 1917 

Schaeffer, Mary 1917 

On Furlough 

266 Hammond Ave., Waterloo, la. 

Blough, Anna V., 1913 

Burlington, Ind. 

Brubaker, Dr. O. G, 1913 

Brubaker, Cora M., 1913 

La Verne, Calif. 

Vaniman, Ernest D., 1913 

Vaniman, Susie C, *. . 1913 

INDIA 

Ahwa, Dangs Forest, via Bilimora, India 

Ebey, Adam, 1900 

Ebey, Alice K, 1900 

Anklesvar, Broach Dist., India 

Arnold, S. Ira, 1913 

Arnold, Elizabeth, 1913 

Lichty, D. J., 1902 

Miller, Eliza B., 1900 

Mow, Anetta, 1917 

Ziegler, Kathryn, 1908 

Bulsar, Surat Dist., India 

Blickenstaff, Verna M., 1919 

Brown, Nettie P., 1919 

Brumbaugh, Anna B., 1919 

Butterbaugh, Andrew G., 1919 

Butterbaugh, Bertha L 1919 

Eby, E. H., 1904 

Eby, Emma H., 1904 

Hoffert, A. T 1916 

Hollenberg, Fred M., 1919 

Hollenberg, Nora R., 1919 

Kintner, Elizabeth 1919 

Miller, A. S. B 1919 

Miller, Jennie B., 1919 

Miller, Sadie J. 1903 

Mohler, Jennie, 1916 

Replogle, Sara G., 1919 

Ross, A. W 1904 

Ross. Flora N., 1904 

Shull, Chalmer G., 1919 

Shull, Mary S., _ 1919 

Summer, Benjamin F., 1919 

Wagoner, J. Elmer, 1919 

Wagoner, Ellen H., 1919 

Dahanu, Thana Dist., India 

Alley, Howard L., 1917 

Alley, Hattie Z., 1917 

Ebbert, Ella, 1917 

Nickey, Dr. Barbara M., 1915 



Annual Report 



Jalalpor, Surat Dist, India 

Forney, D. L., 1897 

Forney, Anna M., 1897 

Grisso, Lillian 1917 

Shumaker, Ida C, 1910 

Vada, Thana Dist., India 

Garner, H. P., 1916 

Garner, Kathryn B., 1916 

Powelf, Josephine 1906 

Post: Umalla, via Anklesvar, India 

Himmelsbaugh, Ida 1908 

Holsopple, Q. A., 1911 

Holsopple, Kathren R., 1911 



Vyara, via Surat, India 

Long, I. S., 

Long, Effie V., 



1903 
1903 



On Furlough 

Huntingdon, Pa. 

Blough, J. M., 1903 

Blough, Anna Z., 1903 



Emmert, Jesse B., 1902 

Emmert, Gertrude R., 1902 

Widdowson, Olive, 1912 

North Manchester, Ind. 

Cottrell, Dr. A. R., 1913 

Cottrell, Dr. Laura M., 1913 

Trotwood, Ohio 

Eby, Anna M., 1912 



La Verne, Calif. 

Kaylor, John L., 1911 

Grantsville, Md. 

Pittenger, J. M., 1904 

Pittenger, Florence B., 1904 

Richland, Pa. 

Royer, B. Mary, 1913 

Mt. Morris, 111. 

Stover, W. B., 1894 

Stover, Mary E., 1894 

Ashland, Ohio 

Swartz, Goldie, 1916 




Representatives of the United Student Volunteers of the Church of the Brethren, Attending the 
Becker Bicentennial Life Work Conference, Winona Lake, Indiana 



From the Volunteers will the future Missionary Force be built. Ten years ago 
the Annual Report listed the names of 30 missionaries. Four of those in service then 
have died, but Volunteers have quickly taken their places and now the Missionary 
Force numbers 101. 



Annual Report 5 

Our Thirty-Fifth Annual Report 

INTRODUCTORY 

Once again old Father Time records a milestone passed, and we must pause even 
in these days of hurry and bustle to recount at some length the efforts, endeavors, 
and victories of the year which closed with Februray 29, 1920. It would be entirely 
deplorable if we could not report progress in the Lord's work during such a year 
as that through which we have just passed. 

The Father has been good and his face has never failed to shine upon the work 
of his children when their efforts were attended with prayer and consecration, and were 
considered in his name. Weak though our efforts have been, faltering though our 
endeavors often have seemed, short though our vision often has appeared, yet the 
Father has seen fit to use the work of the General Mission Board, we confidently 
believe, to magnify his name. We give him the praise for anything that has happened 
which has brought joy to his children. We charge to our own frailty and insufficiency 
everything that has come short of being what it should have been. 

CHRIST, THE WORLD'S GREAT NEED 

We have just come through, we believe, one of the years of greatest chaos in 
the history of the world. The titanic struggle of arms is over, so far as our country 
has been concerned in it, and while the great war is ended, yet more than twenty 
small wars have been waged during the year which we report. The sickness of this 
old world is manifest when we consider that American doctors and nurses have been 
thrust out into the remote corners of the earth because of humanity's physical ills. 
Great unrest has characterized the entire fabric of our civilization in every land; class 
hatred has burst forth in many places into a great conflagration; the industrial world 
has shown signs of increasing distress, and, politically, the peoples of the world have 
caught the foregleam of such freedom as many of them had never dreamed of enjoying, 
while religiously, men have come to see, though this great war, that their old 
religions have been inadequate for the needs of the world. Peoples of heathen lands 
are discovering that their gods are insufficient, and the peoples of our own land are 
discovering, with strengthened conviction, that our own religious tenets have proved 
entirely inadequate for the needs of the world. 

There is hope even in the face of all these signs of unrest, and we should not 
allow ourselves to be overcome with anything approaching pessimism, for thoughtful 
men from the corners of the earth are beginning to see that Christianity has not failed, 
and that Jesus Christ has not proved insufficient, but they are adding their weight 
of testimony to the fact that Jesus Christ with his principles is the only hope of the 
world. Now is the time for the exercise of such an optimism and faith in Jesus Christ 
as we did not know we possessed. May God help the Christian church, that has been 
so lethargic, that it may rise in this supreme hour to meet the supreme challenge 
of the world's supreme need. In the face of these things, it is with unmixed joy that 
we note the advancing tide of faith and desire for action in the Church of the 
Brethren. We are glad that she is showing every evidence of awakening to her fullest 
to do the Lord's will and to assert her undying principles in behalf of the spiritual 
life of mankind. 

WITH OUR MISSIONARIES 

Nearly all of the missionaries appointed at the Winona Lake Conference have 
reached their fields of endeavor. Brother and Sister Glasmire went to Denmark to 
take up the duties which Brother and Sister A. F. Wine were compelled to lay 
down some, years ago. After a considerable search for a home, they are now pleasant- 
ly located and are hard at work at the language. The new missionaries for China 
have been engaged during the past winter in the North China Language School at 
Pekin. From experience our missionaries have learned that it is of utmost importance 



6 Annual Report 

and value to new workers to receive their first language impressions in this place. 
Chinese sounds are hard to get anywhere, and it is very necessary that the mission- 
aries begin right in the study of this difficult tongue. Brother and Sister J. Homer 
Bright, Dr. and Sister Fred J. Wampler, and Sister Anna Hutchison returned to the 
field during the year. Bro. Bright has been chosen as the architect and builder of 
the China Mission, while Dr. Wampler returns to Ping Ting Chou with pledges for 
money to erect a very modern and commodious hospital there. Sister Hutchison 
has returned with joy to her schoolgirls at Liao Chou. 

Going out to India, sixteen new workers left America during the month of 
January, 1920. By the first days of April all had reached their field. With them there 
also went Brother and Sister D. L. Forney, who have been sixteen years away from 
India. It is with no small joy we are able to record that no missionaries have ever 
gone to the field from us, and have remained there any length of time, without 
becoming homesick to return to their adopted land after they have been in their 
homeland for an extended sojourn. Brother and Sister Forney have never lost their 
first love for the India people. Leaving their four daughters behind to complete their 
education, and possibly to join them in years to come, they returned to India, taking 
with them their youngest daughter. 

Because of the difficulties of securing accommodations for India, our missionaries 
going to the field were divided into three groups. The first of these sailed from New 
York Nov. 11. In this party were Bro. Dan Lichty, returning from furlough, and 
Brother and Sister Q. A. Holsopple, with Sisters Sara Replogle and Elizabeth 
Kintner, who went out for their first term of service. Brother and Sister Holsopple 
were retained at home because of Siste'r Holsopple's health. We are glad to know that 
she fully recovered, and they are happy once more in their old station at Umalla, 
India. The first one of the other two parties, with Sister Sadie Miller, sailed from 
Seattle Jan. 10, while the other party sailed from the same port Jan. 27 with Brother 
and Sister D. L. Forney. , 

Our missionaries, with few exceptions, have enjoyed good health during the year. 
Bro. S. P. Berkebile, who spent a faithful term of service in India, returning to 
America in order to fight against the dread disease, tuberculosis, which had taken hold 
of him, finally succumbed in September, 1919. The sympathies of our church are with 
Sister Berkebile and her three splendid sons. 

SUPPORTS OF MISSIONARIES 

Our missionaries are being supported without a single exception, by some in- 
dividuals or local organizations. The following are those entitled to special mention 
because of their supporting missionaries either entirely or in part: 

Altoona Sunday-school, Pa., Sister Ida Himmelsbaugh, India. 

Antietam congregation, Pa., Sister Lizzie A. Flory, China. 

Antioch, Brick, and Bethlehem congregations, Va., Bro. I. E. Oberholtzer, China. 

Barren Ridge congregation, Va., Sister Nora Flory, China. 

Bear Creek congregation, Ohio, Sister Anna M. Eby, India. 

Bethel congregation and Sunday-school, Nebr., Bro. R. C. Flory, China. 

Blickenstaff, Noah and wife, Sister Verna Blickenstaff, India. 

Botetourt Memorial Missionary Society, Va., Bro. A. W. Ross and Family, India. 

Breneman, I. and O., Calif., Bro. John I. Kaylor, India. 

Bridgewater Sunday-school, Va., Bro. Norman A. Seese, China. 

Buck Creek Sunday-school and congregation, Sister Nettie Brown, India. 

Butterbaugh family, 111., Bro. A. G. Butterbaugh, India. 

California, Southern, Sunday-schools, Sister Gertrude Emmert, India. 

Cedar Rapids Sunday-school, Iowa, Sister Emma Horning, China. 

Cerro Gordo Sunday-school, 111., Dr. A. R. Cottrell, India. 

Chiques congregation, Pa., Sister Alice M. Graybill, Sweden. 

Conestoga congregation, Pa., Sister W. E. Glasmire, Denmark. 



Annual Report 7 

Coon River congregation, Iowa, Sister Elizabeth Arnold, India. 

Daggett, A. C, Sister Martha Horning, China. 

Dallas Center Sunday-school, Iowa, partial support of Sister Anna Hutchison, 
China. 

East Nimishillen congregation, Ohio, Sister Anna Brumbaugh, India. 

Elizabethtown congregation, Pa., Sister Bessie M. Rider, China. 

Elk Run and Greenmount congregations, Va., Sister Sarah Z. Myers, China. 

Erb, C. H. and wife, Iowa, Sister Cora Brubaker, China. 
• Franklin Grove congregation, 111., Sister Bertha Butterbaugh, India. 

Hagerstown Young People's Society, Md., Sister E. M. Wampler, China. 

Huntingdon congregation and College, Pa., Bro. J. M. Blough, India. 

Idaho and Western Montana Christian Workers' Societies, Sister Anetta C. Mow, 
India. 

Illinois, Northern, Sunday-schools, Sister Kathryn Garner, India. 

Illinois, Southern, Sunday-schools, Sister Eliza B. Miller, India. 

Indiana, Middle, Sunday-schools, Bro. Adam Ebey, India. 

Indiana, Northern, Sunday-schools, Sisters Mary Stover, India; Minerva Metzger, 
Mary Schaeffer, China. 

Indiana, Southern, Sunday-schools, Bro. W. J. Heisey, China. 

Iowa, Middle, Sunday-schools, Bro. S. Ira Arnold, India. 

Iowa, Northern, Sunday-schools, Sister Anna V. Blough, China. 

Kansas, Northeastern, Sunday-schools, Sister Ella Ebbert, India. 

Kansas, Northwestern, Sunday-schools, Bro. H. L. Alley, India. 

Kansas, Southeastern, Christian Workers' Societies, Sister E. H. Eby, India. 

Kansas, Southwestern, congregations, Brother and Sister F. H. Crumpacker, China. 

Knob Creek congregation, Tenn., Sister Anna B. Seese, China. 

La Verne congregation and Sunday-school, Calif., Brother and Sister Ernest 
Vaniman, China. 

Lebanon congregation, Va., Sister Valley Miller, China. 

Lick Creek congregation, Ohio, Sister Elizabeth Kinter, India. 

Locust Grove Sunday-school, Ind., Sister Sue R. Heisey, China. 

Manchester College Sunday-school, Ind., Sister Laura J. Shock, China. 

Maryland, Middle, Sunday-schools, Brethren H. P. Garner and Benjamin F. 
Summer, India. 

McFarland congregation, Calif., Sister Elsie Blickenstaff, India. 

Mexico congregation, Ind., Sister Lillian Grisso, India. 

Michigan Sunday-schools, Sister Pearl S. Bowman, China. 

Middle River congregation, Va., Bro. Byron M. Flory, China. 

Midway congregation, Pa., Bro. J. F. Graybill, Sweden. 

Missouri, Middle, congregations, Sister Jennie Mohler, India. 

Monitor congregation, Kans., Sister Myrtle Pollock, China. 

Mount Morris College Missionary Society, 111., Bro. D. J. Lichty, India. 

Mount Morris Sunday-school, 111., Sister Sadie J. Miller, India. 

Myers Brothers, Va., Bro. M. M. Myers, China. 

Nebraska congregations, Sister Josephine Powell, India. 

New Carlisle, West Charleston, Donnels Creek, Springfield, congregations, 
Ohio, Bro. O. C. Sollenberger, China. 

Nezperce congregation, Idaho, Dr. D. L. Horning, China. 

Nickey and Buckingham families, Dr. Barbara M. Nickey, India. 

North Manchester Sunday-school, Ind., Sister Alice K. Ebey, India. 

North and South English River Sunday-schools, Iowa, Sister Nettie M. Senger, 
China. 

Oakley congregation and Sunday-school, 111., Sister Ida Buckingham, Sweden. 

Ohio, Northeastern, Sunday-schools, Goldie Swartz, India. 



8 Annual Report 

Ohio, Northwestern, Sunday-schools, Sister Hattie Z. Alley, India. 

Ohio, Southern, Sunday-schools, Bro. J. M. Pittenger, India, Bro. J. Homer 
Bright, China. 

Okaw congregation, 111., Bro. J. E. Wagoner, India. 

Painter Creek congregation, Ohio, Dr. O. G. Brubaker, China. 

Peach Blossom congregation, Md., partial support Sister Anna Hutchison, China. 

Pennsylvania, Eastern, Sunday-schools, Sister Kathryn Ziegler, India. 

Pennsylvania, Middle, congregations, Sister Sara Replogle, India. 

Pennsylvania, Middle, Sunday-schools, Bro. Jesse B. Emmert, India. 

Pennsylvania, Western, Sunday-schools, Sisters Olive Widdowson, Ida Shumaker, 
India; Sister Grace Clapper, China. 

Pine Creek congregation, Ind., Sister Winnie E. Cripe, China. 

Pipe Creek congregation, Ind., Bro. D. L. Forney, India. 

Pipe Creek congregation, Md., Bro. W. B. Stover, India. 

Pleasant View congregation, Va., Sister Edna Flory, China. 

Pleasant View Sunday-school, Ohio, Bro. Levi Stump, India. 

Quemahoning congregation, Pa., Bro. Q. A. Holsopple, India. 

Salem congregation, Ohio,. Sister Minnie F. Bright, China. 

Seventh Circuit Sunday-schools, Pa., Sister Kathren Holsopple, India. 

Shade Creek, Rummel, Scalp Level congregations, Pa., Sister Anna Z. Blough, 
India. 

Shirkey, G. E., Kans., Bro. E. H. Eby, India. 

South Waterloo Christian Workers' Society, Sister A. S. B. Miller, India. 

South Waterloo Sunday-school, Bro. A. S. B. Miller, India. 

Spring Creek congregation, Pa., Bro. W. E. Glasmire, Denmark. 

Timberville congregation, Va., Bro. E. M. Wampler, China. 

Trotwood congregation, Ohio, Sister Elizabeth Oberholtzer, China. 

Tulpehocken congregation, Pa., Sister B. Mary Royer, India. 

Virden congregation, 111., Bro. C. G. Shull, India. 

Virden and Girard Sunday-schools, 111., Dr. Laura M. Cottrell, India. 

Virginia, First and Southern, Sunday-schools, Sister Rebecca Wampler, China. 

Virgina, Northern, Sunday-schools, Dr. F. J. Wampler, China. 

Virginia, Second, congregations, Brother and Sister I. S. Long, India. 

Walnut Sunday-school, Ind., Bro. Andrew Hoffert, India. 

Walnut Grove Sunday-school, Pa., Bro. Samuel Bowman, China. 

Waterloo City Sunday-school, Iowa, Sister C. G. Shull, India. 

Waynesboro Sunday-school, Pa., Bro. W. E. Sollenberger, China. 

Woodbury congregation, Pa., Sister Florence Pittenger, India. 

Yoder, J. D., Kans., Lulu Ullom, China. 

The following desire to support missionaries and have paid a year's support, but 
as yet have no one assigned: 

"Andrews congregation, W. Va. 
First Church, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Oiler, J. J., Pa. 
Sandy Creek, W. Va. 
United Student Volunteers. 
White Oak congregation, Pa. 

FINANCIAL 

The finances of the General Mission Board show up very spendidly for the yeai 
which has just closed, thanks to the liberality of the members of our church. The 
Father, who has permitted these terrible conditions of warfare to be waged in the 
world, and through which war conditions of exchange have been so serious on the 
fields, has forecast our needs with a bountiful hand, and more money has been raised 



Annual Report 9 

this year by more than one hundred thousand dollars than in any year preceding. The 
following financial table, which we present from year to year, will help the reader to 
understand something of our receipts and expenditures: 

Receipts 

1918-1919 1919-1920 Increase 
Donations to Board funds reported in Visitor, etc., .$133,574.21 $198,391.07 $ 64,816.86 

Special relief funds, 4,478.99 6,717.93 2,238.94 

Special supports, transmissions, native workers, 

schools, hospitals, 57,261.74 68,730.30 11,468.56 

Income endowment, earnings bank account, Pub- 
lishing House, missionary education, etc., .... 82,102.97 107,900.91 25,797.94 



Total receipts for work, $277,417.91 $381,740.21 $104,322.30 

Endowment received all funds, $ 85,895.75 95,254.45 9,358.70 

Expenditures 

1918-1919 1919-1920 
World-Wide, annuities, publications, District work, 

general expense, etc., $69,532.61 $85,861.55 $16,328.94 

India, 76,981.11 177,119.07 100,137.96 

China, 71,301.72 62,155.23 *9,146.49 

Denmark and Sweden, 8,025.37 12,035.62 4,010.25 

Special relief funds, 316.14 157.01 159.13 



Total expenditures for work $226,156.95 $337,328.48 $111,171.53 

♦Decrease. 

In addition to this statement, we desire to say that, as might be gleaned from the 
World-Wide account under the Financial Statement appearing at the end of this report, 
the year has closed with a balance of $84,105.08 in the World-Wide Mission account. It 
might be explained that this amount would not be nearly so high if China had received 
her full allowance for the fiscal year, but through the sight-draft method, now in 
operation on our fields, their full amount has not been drawn by them, possibly 
by about $30,000. This amount, too, can be largely charged to deflated exchange. 

Especially would we call your attention to the large expenditures for India. The 
amount for India was increased by a large sum. which was necessarily expended to get 
our large body of new missionaries to the field. Rates of ocean travel have increased 
to such an extent that no one can travel these days at the prices we remember of a 
few years ago. The increase in World-Wide balance can be attributed in great measure 
to the large Winona Conference offering and the Publishing House earnings for the 
preceding year, but not all of this can be credited to that, for there has been a healthy 
increase in gifts all along the line. Some large gifts, too, can be reported for the 
year. A good brother and sister in Indiana gave us $12,000 for endowment from the 
sale of land deeded to us in January, 1919. Another brother and sister have deeded 
us a seventy-four acre farm, retaining life tenure. A good friend in Nebraska has 
given us $10,000 in endowment, while another brother and sister in Iowa are turning 
over to us a large sum as memorials for their only son, who died in camp during the 

twar. From all prospects and inquiries, if we understand the signs of the times, there 
is a great deal of money available for our Board in large gifts. The annuity plan 
of the Board, as will be noted from the large amount of gifts during the year, con- 
tinues to meet with the favor of our Brotherhood. No funds are turned over to us 
which we hold in higher trust than these sums, which are given to us from the funds 
of our dear brethren and sisters. The dollars which they turn over to us, represent- 
ing years of hard work and strenuous toil, are dollars that we can not lightly appreciate. 
"' ~": : 



10 Annual Report 

annuitants later than the date specified in the annuity bonds, and we trust that this 
record may be maintained. 

In the farm-loan field of investments we are able to secure good six per cent loans 
in abundant supply. This is brought about to some extent because of the condition 
of the stock market, in which so much money is flowing at the present time. 

THE VOLUNTEERS 

It is a matter of no small interest to know that the students of our schools 
in their Fellowship Campaign of February and March gloriously went over the top. 
Seven schools thus far heard from oversubscribed the $8,400 set as a goal, by more 
than $4,000. The amount set as a goal is to be used for the equipping of the Ping 
Ting Chou Hospital. Increasing call is coming for assistance to prospective mission- 
aries in their school work, and especially those in medical colleges. It seems absolutely 
imperative that worthy students, who are not blessed with sufficient financial means 
of their own, must be helped if we are to have a sufficient number of doctors and mis- 
sionaries for our fields. It would seem no more than the part of justice for the church 
to help those worthy ones whom we are asking to devote their lives without stint 
to the work of the Lord. 

The following officers have served the united organization during the past year: 

President, Foster B. Statler 

Vice President, I. W. Moomaw 

Secretary-Treasurer, ^ Ruth Forney 

Editorial Secretary, Miles Blickenstaff 

Traveling Secretary, A. D. Helser 

From the financial statement given it would seem that the Lord is answering our 
prayers with abundance of resources, and is unmistakably pointing the way towards the 
unoccupied regions beyond. At the same time, when exchange is so deflated, men are 
so restless, living is so expensive, and all conditions abnormal, it is the part of judicious 
missionary finance to be prepared for any kind of political and social upheaval that 
mortal man can devise. 

THE FORWARD MOVEMENT 

Beginning with Jan. 1, 1919, our Board, in harmony with the Sunday School 
and Educational Boards, inaugurated their Five-Year Forward Movement. 

At the beginning of 1920 the Board felt it to be necessary that this Movement 
be given new impetus, as no one was available until that date who could give his entire 
time to this movement. A special meeting of the Joint Boards was called, at which 
all the members of our Board were present, in January, 1920. At this meeting Bro. 
Chas. D. Bonsack was appointed director of the Forward Movement. The goals, as 
already set, and with which our people have become acquainted, will continue, with 
some exceptions, to be those for which we are striving. Financially, it has seemed 
from the very outset that the goals have been made too low. Accordingly, this Joint 
Meeting, of which our Board was a part, decided that for missions and education we 
should call upon the church during this fiscal year to contribute the sum of one million 
dollars as a Conference offering. Associated with our general director, a number 
of others were appointed, and in turn, District and local directors were chosen. How- 
ever, the Joint Boards felt that it was absolutely necessary, if greater things were 
attempted for missions, to provide the necessary trained men to carry out the plans 
which might be projected. This work could be done only by our schools, than which 
we have no more worthy agencies. In order, therefore, that the facilities of our schools 
might be increased sufficiently to give the necessary training for that increasing body 
of young people who are knocking at their doors for admittance, our schoolmen held 
a meeting in February and decided to ask for $1,670,000 during the year for purposes 
of equipment, buildings, and endowment for our educational institutions. The Church 
of the Brethren is rising loyally and heroically to this great program, and we feel 



Annual Report 11 

fchat this great sum will be raised by our loyal brethren and sisters. If all do their 
part, the amount can be easily reached, and far more. 

In addition to these financial matters, pertaining to the Forward Movement, the 
General Mission Board is organizing itself with a desire to promote spiritual lines of 
activity, at the same time and in a measure commensurate with their financial askings. 
Bro. M. R. Zigler, of Virginia, was chosen Home Mission Secretary in the latter part 
of the fiscal year and is already at his task. It is his part and desire to make his office 
and himself the clearing house through which various ideas from the different District 
Boards can be made available for all the rest. Among his duties will be a closer 
investigation of the southern field and a more careful organization for assisting in 
those needy territories of the Brotherhood. 

MISSIONARY EDUCATION 

Bro. H. Spenser Minnich has been chosen as Missionary Educational Secretary, 
whose duties will be to promote missionary education and devotions through mission 
study, programs, lantern slides, maps, charts, leaflets, exhibits, and District gatherings. 
There is a widespread and growing interest in missionary educational and inspirational 
work. A splendid body of young men and women were occupied in the summer of 
1919 with visiting our churches in behalf of missionary education and the Forward 
Movement. Twenty-four State Districts were wholly or partially canvassed in this 
cause. Those not touched, with few exceptions, had been reached in the two years 
preceding, or will be during the coming summer. The Board has endeavored to pro- 
mote missionary education, and the increase in volunteers, workers for the field, and 
funds available for work, is splendid evidence that our church is being favorably 
informed along missionary lines. The goal to which we strive has by no means been 
reached, and so we strive to go forward. The Missionary Educational Secretary will 
be glad to consider, with the missionary committee and District workers, any plans 
for aggressive work. It is his desire personally to visit churches where there is an 
opportunity to be helpful. It is a noticeable fact that some churches with a missionary 
committee or secretary are far in advance of those not having these workers. The 
Board urgently asks each church to place some good person at this task. 

DISTRICT MISSIONARY SECRETARIES 

Arkansas, First District and Southeastern Missouri. 

California, Northern, S. P. Noll, Parlier, Calif. 

California, Southern and Arizona, J. W. Cline, 1823 11th Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Colorado, Western, and Utah, J. A. Austin, Fruita, Colo. 

Idaho and Western Montana, M. Alva Long, Weiser, Idaho. 

Illinois, Northern, and Wisconsin, none appointed. 

Illinois, Southern, S. G. Bucher, Astoria, 111. 

Indiana, Middle, Ira E. Long, Andrews, Ind. 

Indiana, Northern, Harvey Hartsough, Nappanee, Ind. 

Indiana, Southern, none appointed. 

Iowa, Middle, O. W. Diehl, Beaver, Iowa. 

Iowa, Northern, Minnesota and South Dakota, Virgil C. Finnell, Elgin, 111. 

Iowa, Southern, A. W. Miller, South English, Iowa. 

Kansas, Northeastern, J. Clyde Forney, McPherson, Kans. 

Kansas, Northwestern, and Northeastern Colorado, Roy A. Crist, Quinter, Kans. 

Kansas, Southeastern, G. E. Shirkey, Madison, Kans. 

Kansas, Southwestern, and Southern Colorado, none appointed. 

Maryland, Eastern, W. E. Roop, Westminster, Md. 

Maryland, Middle, John S. Bowlus, Burkittsville, Md. 

Maryland, Western, James W. Beeghly, Oakland, Md. 

Michigan, Ethel Whitmer, Beaverton, Mich. 

Missouri, Middle, D. L. Mohler, Leeton, Mo. 



12 Annual Report 

Missouri, Northern, none appointed 

Missouri, Southern, and Northwestern Arkansas, A. W. Adkins, Osceola, Mo. 

Nebraska, F. S. Eisenbise, Beatrice, Nebr. 

North Dakota, Eastern Montana and Western Canada, O. A. Myers, Williston, 
N. D. 

North and South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, Geo. A. Branscom, Campobello, 
S. C. 

Ohio, Northeastern, A. H. Miller, Louisville, Ohio. 

Ohio, Northwestern, J. S. Dejeane, Nevada, Ohio. 

Ohio, Southern, Ira G. Blocher, Greenville, Ohio. 

Oklahoma, Panhandle of Texas and New Mexico, John R. Pitzer, Cordell, Okla. 

Oregon, Thos. Barklow, Myrtle Point, Oregon. 

Pennsylvania, Eastern, Geo. W. Weaver, Manheim, Pa. 

Pennsylvania, Middle, John B. Miller, Curryville, Pa. 

Pennsylvania, Southeastern, New Jersey and Eastern New York, W. W. Kulp, 
Pottstown, Pa. 

Pennsylvania, Southern, none appointed. 

Pennsylvania, Western, D. K. Clapper, Meyersdale, Pa., Field Representative for 
District Board. 

Tennessee, A. E. Nead, Limestone, Tenn. 

Texas and Louisiana, M. H. Peters, Manvel, Texas. 

Virginia, Eastern, I. N. H. Beahm, Roanoke, Va. 

Virginia, First District, C. D. Hylton, Troutville, Va. 

Virginia, Northern, none appointed. 

Virginia, Second District, J. W. Hess, Bridgewater, Va. 

Virginia, Southern, S. P. Reed, Floyd, Va. 

Washington, C. N. Stutzman, Wenatchee, Wash. 

West Virginia, First District, W. L. Teets, Eglon, W. Va. 

West Virginia, Second District, Verna May Kirk, Junior, W. Va. 

In conclusion, it would give us great pleasure to report all of the splendid heroic 
examples and incidents of missionary sacrifice and service that have been called to 
our attention during the year. .We would like to give personal recognition to such, 
but it is apparent at once that this is impossible. We desire to express ourselves as 
being grateful for all the evidences of your love and interest that you constantly 
manifest towards us. Only by your efforts, seasoned with your prayers, have the 
victories been accomplished thus far. Only through your continued cooperation can 
victories continue to be won. May we labor together, loyal and faithful to the ad- 
vancement of the cause of him whom we so much love. 

s SWEDEN 

REPORT BY J. F. GRAYBILL 

The Work in Sweden for 1919 

We were not in'as close touch with the work in Sweden during 1919 as the previous 
years. We left Sweden for our furlough March 11 and returned Nov. 12. So w< 
have been on the field only four months. However, we kept in touch with the work 
as best we could by correspondence. The work in Malmo was left in the hands of 
Bro. Hydehn, who was elected to the ministry a few years ago and is a promising 
young man. Sister Buckingham also was here to do her part. 

Before leaving we did what we could to launch the Forward Movement and to do 
our little part in the advancement of the kingdom. The result in the number of 
accessions was not what we desired, as the statistics will show. We can plough and 
sow and even water, but the Lord must give the increase. In the financial end we 






Annual Report 13 

were able to play a better part. Our offering for mission purposes far exceeded that 
of previous years. For this we thank our Heavenly Father. 

Our Sunday-schools have closed a successful year. While the number in attend- 
ance has not increased, the interest has been good. No new schools have been or- 
ganized, but two Junior Societies were formed, and they are moving along nicely. 
During the past years we had quite a deficit in our Sunday-school treasury, but in 1919, 
for the first time in the history of our Sunday-schools, there was a little balance. This 
was due largely to a liberal donation from a good friend. 

The Junior Society does not have the enrollment it had at the beginning of the 
year. S6me become disinterested in the work and drop out. Others arrive at the age 
when they can be transferred to the Young People's Society. Those who remain are 
as a rule the workers. And these count most in the work if not in number. This 
organization, with the aid of the Sunday-school Birthday Mission Bank, is endeavor- 
ing to support an orphan in India. 

The Young People's Society has, during the past year, received a number of 
new members into the organization and is continuing its social, charity and mission 
work. They succeeded in clothing thirty-two poor schoolchildren. They also had a 
little set-out of coffee and cakes for the feeble minded at the city poorhouse and a 
Christmas dinner for some seventy poor. This organization has pledged itself for the 
support of a native worker in China. It also supports a mission station in a country 
village fifteen miles from Malmo. 

In the beginning of 1919 we organized a Berean Bible Class. The members are 
quite active and the class promises to be a center of spiritual activity in the church. 
The class is interested in missions and is helping to raise funds for the spread of the 
Gospel. 

Upon our return to the work in November we conducted a series of meetings. 
Brother and Sister Glasmire, who were obliged to remain with us for some time, un- 
til they could rent a house to move into, assisted in these meetings. We had good 
meetings, but the result in converts was not what we desired. There was but one 
confession. We continue to work the work of him who has called us into his service. 
The harvest is plenteous, but the laborers are few. Help us pray for more laborers 
in this part of the Lord's vineyard. 

District Treasurer's Report for 1919 
Receipts 

J. F. Graybill, Kr. 4,569.37 

General Mission Board, 18,926.00 

Miss, offering, Swedish churches, 768.54 

Total receipts for the year, 24,263.01 

Expenditures 

Hall rent in Malmo, 1,000.00 

Hall rent in Simrishamn, 120.00 

Hall rent in Rosenvang, 216.00 

Hall rent in Olserod, 100.00 

Support A. Andersson, Limhamn, 1,787.50 

Suupport P. Jonsson, Vanneberga, 1,787.50 

Support B. Lindell, 01ser6d, 1,787.50 

Support, rent, etc., M. V. Olsson, Tingsryd, 2,662.50 

Support P. Hydehn, Malmo, 3,550.00 

Support Ida Buckingham, 1,850.00 

Traveling exp. and postage, A. Andersson, 234.45 

Traveling ex^ and postage, P. Jonsson, 200.00 

Traveling exp. and. postage, B. Lindell 111.90 

Traveling exp. and postage, M. V. Olsson, 233.45 



14 



Annual Report 



Traveling exp. and postage, P. Hydehn, 

Miscellaneous, 

Miscellaneous in Malmo church, 
Miscellaneous in Vanneberga church, 

Miscellaneous in Olserod church, 

Miscellaneous in Simrishamn church, 

An account book, 

Bal. for Swedish church paper, 



111.30 
33.20 
284.17 
87.40 
50.00 
25.00 
11.26 
1,062,00 



Total expenditures for the year, 



17,305.13 



Balance to 1920, 

Malmo, Jan. 16, 1920, 



6,958.78 
P. Hydehn, Treasurer. 



> Statistical Report for 


1919 






















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170 


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$ 734.17 
368.07 










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11.50- 


Stockholm,* 

































Total, 1 5| 4| 6[ 3|782[153| 53| 62| 21|1445j 9| 6| 5| 4| 1| 2\ 4|159|$1231.2» 

Not represented, no report. 



! DENMARK 

REPORT BY J. F. GRAYBILL 
The Work in Denmark for 1919 

Our report of the work in Denmark will necessarily be very short. In February, 
just before sailing to the States, I made a trip to attend an extra committee meeting 
by their request. The burden of this meeting was to arrange for the financing of the 
debt on the chapel built in Bedsted a few years ago. There was also a little extra 
work planned at this meeting for the young minister who has not had an opportunity 
for development. This was all the work that was done in the Thy congregation last 
year. Eld. Martin Johansen was sick at the time of the meeting and did not recover 
sufficiently to do much preaching all year. 

Upon our return to Sweden Bro. Glasmire and I made a trip to Denmark to attend 
the District Meeting which convened in December. This meeting was characterized 
by much interest and zeal for the Lord's, work. They are very glad for Brother and 
Sister Glasmire, from whom they expect much help and inspiration. They are now 
located in the Thy congregation and are busy at the Danish language. This was not: 
according to what we had planned, but was the best we could do. It is utterly im- 
possible to rent a house in Copenhagen at the present time. Now they are right by 
the work and will be able to give the work in Thy the much-needed stimulus. They 
will, however, not be able to get the language as well as in Copenhagen, and the 
field, to our mind, is not as fruitful as the city would be. Then, again, this may be 
the Lord's way. Our ways and thoughts are not always the Lord's ways and thoughts. 

The work in Denmark lagged more last year than in previous years. Eld. Martin 
Johansen had sickness and even death in his home. He was sick the greater part 
.of the year and had a serious operation performed on his head. He has fully re- 



Annual Report 



15 



covered but the strain was so hard on his wife that she is a nervous wreck. She has 
been to a sanitarium, but failed to get much relief. All the preaching done in this con- 
gregation was by a young man of very little talent. 

Elders Hansen and Eskildsen, in the Vendsyssel congregation, are not able physi- 
cally to do much work. They held but a few meetings during the summer. The preach- 
ing done in this congregation was by a deacon brother. There was more work done 
in the Vendsyssel congregation in 1919 than in the Thy congregation, and the offering 
for World-Wide Missions is complimentary, as the statistics accompanying will show. 

There is a decrease of eight in membership, three by death, one withdrawal 
and four disowned. This looks as if some work had been done. The question is 
whether it was the right kind of work. 

Brother and Sister Glasmire will fill a needy post. The harvest is plenteous and 
the laborers are few, is true of our field in Denmark. I trust the Board will sc~ fit 
to send the young Danish brother, who is preparing himself at Bethany Bible School 
for his home field, as soon as he is ready for the field. He is greatly needed. We 
need to remember this field as well as our other fields at a throne of grace. 

1919 Statistics of the Denmark Congregations 



Congregations 



Vendsyssel, 
Thy, 



Total, 



I 3 | 1 | 7 | 59 | | 4 | 1 |. 



■>-> u 
una 



25 I Kr. 
_45 [JKr. 
70 | Kr: 



759.51 
73.2 5 
832.76 



INDIA 

REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1919 BY ADAM AND ALICE K. EBEY 

Some things are hard to do, some are harder, and, usually, one thing is the hard- 
est of all. Some things are easy to do, some are easier, and, usually, one thing is the 
easiest of all. When it comes to writing an annual report for the whole mission 
amid the worry, flurry, scurry of the average mission station, the hardest thing to do 
is to get a decent report ready; the easiest to let it go from day to day and not get 
it written at all. 

In many ways this has been a hard year. The influenza of 1918, and of the earlier 
months of 1919, stopped active, aggressive work. The scarcity of foodstuffs and the 
high prices have made the year hard. But on the other hand it has been a good year. 
In spite of the hard things, there has been growth in every line. There have been 
building and getting ready to build. There have been teaching and preparing to 
teach. There have been language study, Bible work, medical work, and everything 
that go to make up the sum of mission activity. Altogether it has been a year of blessing 
and uplifting and growing into higher and better things. The few have stood still; the 
many have gone on into fuller service. It is twenty-five years since Brother and Sister 
Stover and Sister Ryan came to India. There has been wonderful growth in these 
twenty-five years. As the older missionaries look back whence we have come, and 
see the rugged rocks over which the mission has climbed, the winding over mountain 
paths, near dangerous precipices, the wading and swimming of swollen rivers of 
obstacles and difficulties, we thank God and take courage. We look back! We stand 
still for a moment and look back! We cry out, "What hath God wrought!" We 
praise and adore. We turn about and look at the mountains, and rocVs, and rivers 
ahead of us. Our faith grows greater. As we look we see what God is about to do, 



16 Annual Report 

even more than we can think. God is ready to do more than he has done. Praise 
his name! 

Ahwa 

REPORT BY ADAM EBEY 

This has been a year of lights and shadows here; of joys and sorrows. Perhaps 
the shadows prevailed. There were more deaths than births. There were more 
hungry people than satisfied ones. First, water too little; then, water too much. 

The Dangs, of which Ahwa is the capital, so to speak, are a number of petty 
states under Bhil chieftains. There are some fourteen of these. They are but nomi- 
nal rulers. Years ago, the British Raj made treaties with these men, giving them a 
yearly allowance in return for good behavior, timber and other rights. 

The D?ngs proper have an area of nearly a thousand square miles with a popula- 
tion of about thirty thousand. To the south is Surgana, with an area of about three 
hundred and fifty square miles and a population of about thirteen thousand. Nearly 
all the people are of the backward jungle classes. 

Brother and Sister Blough were in charge during January, 1919. We came in 
January and took over the work in February. We threw ourselves into the work and 
difficulties, sparing ourselves in no way. In October, 1918, the " flu " had made havoc 
in most of the surrounding villages as well as in Ahwa itself. There was a mortality 
in some villages of from twenty-five to forty per cent. In February, 1919, it broke 
out again, but usually where it had not been before. Especially did it strike hard 
the village of Chankal. This village had been spared before. The headman was a 
Christian. There were some six other Christian families with a teacher and school. The 
headman, Bro. Vitou Shende, took the " flu." He died. Others, Christians and Bhils, were 
hard hit. Most of the Christians scattered here and there. Of nineteen Christians, 
seven died. Most of those who died, died here at Ahwa. We did what we could for 
these sufferers. This was little, indeed. A few of those who were very sick got well. 
The school has been closed ever since. 

The saddest " flu " case Occurred at Chankal. Laksman Haipat, a young Chris- 
tian farmer, twenty-five years old, was married Nov. 22, 1917, by Bro. Blough. The 
wife did not live long. Jan. 28, 1919, Bro. Blough united Bro. Laksman to his second 
wife. This was at Chankal just a few days before the "flu" broke out at that place. 
Laksman was driving a cart for another brother, being gone from home from three 
to five days each trip. On his return from one of these trips he found the village 
almost deserted. Searching for his wife, he found her under a large tree near by, 
dying. She died. There was no one to help him bury her. He dug a grave. She was 
a heavy woman. He could not carry her, so he took a rope and dragged her into the 
grave. What else was there for him to do? He married his third wife the day after 
Christmas, 1919. 

Here at Ahwa the missionaries had their hands full. The District Meeting was 
at Vyara during this " flu " siege. Most of our Christian people went, as well as 
Sister Ebey. I could not go and leave the sick people. I was able to be of little 
real service to those who had pneumonia. There is no mission hospital here. The 
poor, stricken people had come here from Chankal. They put up wherever they could 
find a place. Bro. Raising Valab went into a deserted house with his family one Sun- 
day. The next Friday his little girl died. He took his family, wife and two little 
boys, down on the river to a shack. Inside of a few days his wife and older boy 
died. Bro. R. was very sick, as well as the little boy. He returned to Ahwa and 
lived in the old oil factory building. I expected both of them to die, but they got well. 
His wife had a sister, a widow with several children. They were not Christians, but 
they came here, too. They lived in an old, forsaken house. One morning word came 
that she was dead. Her children forsook the body. No one paid any attention to it. 
I got some men to dig a grave. One of our weakest Christians, Bro. Tunia Tanhu, 
was always ready to help me out. He and I wrapped up the nude, forsaken body 



Annual Report 17 

and carried it to the open grave, the grave-digger standing off to one side until we 
had the corpse in the grave and the filling partly done. I always used a mask over 
my nose and mouth, which was kept damp in eucalyptus oil. 

We are not doing much medical work here. There is not much to do. There is 
a government dispensary and hospital here with two doctors and several helpers. 
But people have much faith in the medical ability of missionaries, and hence come for 
medicine. It is necessary to keep a few remedies on hand. People have more faith 
in an un-medical missionary than in a non-missionary medical man. We had some 
three thousand new cases during the year. In our dispensary we also keep phenyle 
for cattle, so many cattle get maggots in their sores and scratches. Then people 
want "keerdtail," worm-oil, phenyle. We sell gallons of it in small lots. 

Bro. Blough asked me if I would undertake the building of a new bungalow. 
Plans had been about made to erect one. We have been working hard to get material 
together. We wanted to get the foundations in before the rains, but owing to the 
lack of water we could not get it done. There was a very slight rainfall in 1918. 
Nearly all the wells went dry. Those that did not go dry were kept in charge of the 
police. We had to let our clothes go a month without washing. We had to haul 
water for the house and then keep the barrels under lock and key, or find it had 
been stolen the next morning. We have seen several food famines and but one water 
famine. Let us have food famines, if we must have one or the other. Somehow food 
can be brought in, but water is hard to haul miles and miles. Bullocks and cows had 
to be watched, lest they leap into the wells where they smelled the water. This is a 
digression from building a bungalow — the big reason why we did not get the founda- 
tions in last June. In this climate it is wise to have the foundations ready at the 
opening of rainy season, that they may soak and settle and be ready for any leveling 
that needs to be done. It ensures a stronger building. 

We have a Christian stone-dresser here. For him we put up a house and shed, 
that he might work during the rainy season. He spent several months getting stones 
ready for the foundations as well as for the building. The uninitiated and inexperienced 
can not appreciate what it means to put a large house in the jungle. There is no 
good clay for bricks and tiles. There is no good limestone to burn. To cart these 
in is to treble the price. Now, let us talk a little about water. Perhaps we 
may be able to digress the other way, and get back to building work from the water 
question. 

We all suffered for water. People will go to the fast-drying-up wells at midnight, 
hoping to get a little water for cooking and drinking purposes. People begged water; 
they fought each other to get 
water; they stole water. Cattle 
had to be driven five miles to 
get a little stagnant, filthy 

water. The rivers had gone Hgjj K»*~ <#> 

dry — only small kettles in the 
rock holding a little water. De- 
liver us from another water 
famine! 

Sunday, June 1, was a big 
day for Ahwa. The forenoon 
was hot! So hot! Dry! So 
dry! We had our usual serv- 
ices. We suffered from the heat. 
In the early afternoon we saw 
some clouds in the east hanging 
over the mountains. By three 

o'clock they were over US and What the Missionaries Must Fight Against. Hauling Liquor 
J to Ahwa 







18 Annual Report 

it was dark like dusk. Soon a storm broke. It rained; it hailed; it blew. It was so 
refreshing to us! It was a dangerous storm, but we enjoyed it. There was water in 
sight. People rejoiced, though no one was ready for rain. They soaked the dirt off 
their skin that had been accumulating a month or more. Large hailstones fell; the 
largest I have ever seen. The children were soon out after them. Hail was a new 
thing to most of them. They actually ate ice in India in the hottest month of the year. 

We gave much help to our teachers, workers, servants, farmers, Christians and 
non-Christians. We turned a bedroom into a " go-down " or storeroom for rice and 
other grain. It meant a lot of work, but it was service for the Master. This relief 
work helped to increase our church attendance about a hundred per cent. There is 
more than twice as much grain at the close of 1919 as there was at the end of 1918, 
but high prices still prevail and there will be shortage again. 

The close of the rains found us ready to cut a lot of hay and stack it. We have 
several ox-teams to put to work hauling for the new bungalow soon. We have 
given money to many men as an advance on hauling. Thus they bind themselves, and 
others have no right to demand their services. Brick and sand are daily coming. We 
hope to get the foundations in before another rainy season. 

At one time, in 1918, twelve schools were open. Two teachers died from the 
" flu." Several schools were scattered. When we arrived in January but nine were 
going. Several of these were about to close. Some were closed for a few months; 
others have not been reopened yet. Others have revived. One new school was 
opened. Village school-work here is uphill work. People are illiterate and most of 
them desire to keep their children so. It is a hard thing to create a desire for better 
things. Even trained teachers are not succeeding very well. When we shall be able 
to have some of our own boys and girls trained as teachers, we may hope for better 
things. There is a great open field for work here. We hope to have another family 
of missionaries here as soon as we have the new bungalow ready. Then some one 
can devote his time to supervising the schools. We have an Indian brother, a 
minister, who is partly supervising the schools, but he is not able to do the work 
required. Closer and sympathetic work is needed. The close of 1919 finds us with 
six schools doing fairly good work, two poor work, two very, very poor, and two 
closed. The Ahwa school has advantages over the others. Here we are able to give 
some supervision and the resident boarders help out much. 

The church has grown in numbers and many members have grown spiritually. 
We are sorry to say a few have retrograded. The attendance has been good at Sun- 
day-school and preaching services. The average for the third quarter was over a 
hundred, and for the fourth quarter it was one hundred and fifteen. The opportunities 
for teaching are great. Oh, that we might be able to improve them fully! There 
have been twenty-nine baptisms. The year opened with seventy-five members and 
closes with ninety-six. Several members died and one received a letter. 

The mission has been operating a soda-water plant for some years. This is not 
for financial gain. Owing to lack of a proper place and to inefficient supervision and 
help, we did not get much done from April to December. In November the building 
was removed to a site near the bungalow, where we can help along a little as well 
as see that the work is properly done and things kept measurably clean. We have 
put a steady man on the job to learn the business and it has shown improvement at 
once. We have the machine in good running order and we hope to put out a lot 
of good soda water during 1920. We are looking to the closing of the near-by liquor 
shop early next year. It is two miles away, but people who want liquor will go. 
We want to be ready to supply good soda water, raspberryade, gingerade, and lemon- 
ade, and possibly, later, some other kinds of drinks. For the soda we charge 2 cents 
per bottle; for the others, 4 cents. This business will in time more than pay for it- 
self. 

The health of the missionaries, of the people in general, has been good. There 
has been but little serious sickness since the influenza outbreak. But one grown 






Annual Report 19 



Christian died since then. One boy died in the school, and several girls who were 
weak when they came. 

We look into the future, full of faith in God's promise; full of hope for the 
success of the work here; and full of love — not so full, however, as we should be for 
these people and the work among them. We have a big job, and it seems to be get- 
ting bigger all the time, and we seem to be less and less able to do all that we are 
expected to do. Pray for us and help us in that way. Pray that God may be glorified 
through our service, and that of these saved ones. The work is yours; it is ours; 
it is God's! 

REPORT BY ALICE K. EBEY 

The year 1919 has been one of the busiest and happiest we have spent in India. 
Notwithstanding the isolation and the difficulties connected with a station like Ahwa, 
situated far from the railroad and the source of supplies, and the deprivation of 
fellowship with our other missionaries, the opportunities for teaching the Gospel 
and for helping those who are most in need of help are certainly many and great. 
These opportunities were increased during the past year by the larger number of 
needy ones who came to our doors, because of famine conditions. 

The duties of the me-sahib are many, especially in a station where there is 
work for several missionaries. The care of the house and the children comes first, 
of course. Then several hours of each day, during a large part of the year, were 
devoted to the school lessons of our own daughters. 

To the work among the women I have not been able to give the attention that 
this important work requires. We have about twenty Christian women in our com- 
munity here at Ahwa. Most of them are new converts, women who have been reared 
in these Bhil huts, seeing and knowing little but the poverty and filth, the ignorance, 
superstition and idolatry common to primitive women of the forest and jungle. The 
truths of our Bible and the precepts of our Gospel are foreign to their thought and 
life. Two Indian Bible women, the wives of our evangelists, have been giving a little 
time to visiting and teaching these Christian women and occasionally making visits 
to some of the heathen women near us. These Bible women have their home 
duties and are not specially prepared for work of this kind, but under the grace of 
God we trust they have been able to accomplish some good. 

Every Thursday we have held a meeting for our Christian women and a few 
others who were willing to come. At this meeting we have been trying to teach the 
fundamental truths of Christianity. We find it not easy to put the truth in form simple 
enough for their minds to grasp. We have also tried to teach the women how to 
pray. Our success along this line has not been great, for not more than two or 
three ofour Dangi Christian women will attempt to pray in public. But most of them 
have learned to refrain from talking during services and can repeat the Lord's prayer. 

Besides the two Bible women located here in Ahwa, we have six women located 
in villages who are supposed to spend a part of their time in visiting and teaching 
the women in their respective villages. 
We regret that we have not been able 
personally to spend some time with these 
women in the villages. 

At the beginning of the year there 
were six girls in the boarding school. 
Twenty new girls came in. Some of 



these were orphans left after the rav- 
ages of the influenza, and some are the 
girls of parents unable to clothe and 
feed them during the famine days. Three 
girls died, two girls under school age 
have been taken home by parents since 
harvest, and one large girl, who was The Place of Baptism at Ahwa, Dangs 




20 Annual Report 

with us only a few weeks, returned to her heathen relatives, leaving us twenty at the 
close of the year. These girls do their own grinding on handmills, and their own cook- 
ing, washing and sewing under the direction of a matron. They are in school every day 
and most of them are making commendable progress in their school work. Five of 
these girls have been baptized during the year, making eight members of the chnrch 
among our little flock of girls. Their quarters are cramped, and we hope to have more 
and better arrangements soon. We praise God for these few jewels that have been 
gathered from the great struggling mass of heathendom and ignorance and darkness 
about us. 

We have had teachers' meeting each Saturday afternoon. We had six teachers. 
These and two officers have been fairly regular attendants, and have shown a real 
interest in the study of the lessons and in methods of presenting them to their classes. 

Anklesvar 

REPORT BY W. B. STOVER 

" Papa, there is a man wants to see you." " Yes, Helen, tell him to sit down a 
bit. I will be there in a minute." So I answered our little girl, as I had just sat 
down to write this report, and had a caller. I went to see him. We had a pleasant 
little chat. He did not want anything particular, but as being pleasant goes a long 
way, I just forgot my report as we chatted together. When he was ready to go 
there were four in his stead, all on one errand bent, but I did not know the errand. 
Then a village teacher came, and I took the teacher first. We talked. He was ready 
to make the transfer I asked him to make, as the work in his village was not as 
good as it should be, so he would better try elsewhere. I had been out the night for 
a service in Jitalie village, and when I returned it was after ten in the morning. But 
I had a pleasant time in the evening, a service with about twenty-two present, all 
Christians but one, and he under conviction of duty, and after the meeting I went 
to the home of a friendly Mohammedan, where we talked till we could not longer 
remain awake. They tell me they are hard pressed now, harder than ever; that the 
whole village indebtedness is about 75,000 rupees, and the outlook for crops, because 
of the unusual rains in December, is not at all good. The woman said, " God above 
and the ground beneath, that is all we feel sure about these days, Sahib." Both in 
Jitalie and Dadarl I was exceedingly kindly received by the Mohammedan people, 
who are friends now. But back to this report. I must get at it at once. There 
goes the bell for dinner, and five or six men sitting on the front veranda. Well, that 
is what we used to pray for, that people would come to us, and the Lord is surely 
answering that prayer of ours. 

After the noon meal we have our daily prayers. After prayers I must see my 
visitors and get at my report. I fear I will be last of all in getting the thing done. 
These men? Yes, the group from one village are in difficulty. It is a case of police 
oppression. The police forced one of them to go with him, beating him and saying 
that he must say certain things in evidence on a certain liquor case in which he was in- 
terested, "the man insisted that he knew nothing of the case, and could not be a 
witness, but the police said he must have a witness, and "I want you to say so and 
so!" But the man refused, and the police beat him rather severely. Then the man 
committed the blunder of trying to have a place in the sun, so to speak, for he re- 
ported on the police, A little bribe money cleared the police, who, in turn, now seeing 
his, opportunity, got up a false charge against the poor fellow who refused to give 
false evidence. And now they are summoned to the court on this false charge. Will 
I help them? 

It doesn't pay to mix in too much with this kind of thing, for the story may be 
flavored, and the missionary may be misled, and that would be bad to find out after a 
while. So I told them they should answer the call of the court, and we would see what 



Annual Report 21 

happened. Then I advised them to trust in the Lord and always tell the truth; to tell 
no lie, even to get off from a false charge. 

Hello! Come right in. We keep open doors here. What can I do for you? You 
have a letter from one of the men who went to labor corps, and he says he has 
rheumatism. Well, that is too bad. And he wants you to make him some of the 
kind of food his mother used to make, and send him a little through the postoffice! 
\ Well, perhaps that will help him anyhow. Then — yes, I see, you want to draw money 
from his account to pay the bill? All right, I think it a good investment. Here is 
the money. Did you go to church yesterday? Forgot? That was too bad. Remem- 
ber the Lord's Day, the Lord's church, and the Lord's Book; if you remember these 
three, you will sure be a good Christian. Say it over now, the Lord's Day, the Lord's 
church, the Lord's Book. Good. Now you may go. 

And then it was time to go to the courtroom. I had arranged to help get some 
property transfers made; that is, to help the owners to get their names rightly regis- 
tered in the matter of land I had secured for them some years ago, but when I reached 
the court the men had not come! There was a case on hand. A fight had taken place 
between some Mohammedans. Both sides are friends and ask if I can't say a good word 
• to the magistrate. No, no, no, I can't do that; it would not be fair to the facts. The 
magistrate must make out his judgment from the facts you give. All tell the truth, 
and then we can leave the matter there. It will come out right. 

Now, then, I am back at the typewriter again. The day is about gone and I have 
not one word written for that report. What will I do? "The year has come and 
gone." But every one knows that. It will hardly do to begin one's report in that sort 
of fashion. I will try again. " We are preparing for home, and Bro. D. J. Lichty is 
here to take up the work we have had in hand these years." But that is not of last 
year. Better quit. Making a report is really one of the most undesirable parts of 
mission work. Why, I know missionaries who would rather go all day without any- 
thing to eat, hold two or three preaching services and walk several miles meanwhile, 
than to write a report, and say we did this and we did that, we need this and we need 
that, but what are we to do? There must be something of a report made out, and 
that just now! 

There was great scarcity, bordering on famine. The money sent from home, to- 
gether with other aid given here, was distributed conscientiously among the needy of 
the people. When the local board began to give aid, I put myself at their disposal 
for that sort of work, and some fifteen villages were allotted to me for aid distribu- 
tion. Men were appointed — that is, small committees for distribution purposes — 
and in each part .of the territory a Christian teacher also was added, when one was 
available. A few villages preferred to come to the bungalow once a week for the 
help they might get, and it was so arranged when they asked it. To certain persons, 
mostly Christians, though not all, by any means, money was lent on a three years' 
condition, without interest, a fifth to be repaid the first year, two-fifths the second 
year, and the remaining two-fifths the third year. This plan was much appreciated. 
That, too, was given on the joint-loan plan, which means all the men of a village 
make themselves equally responsible for the payment of the others in that village, 
all getting at once, and all signing the same papers. Now we will see how well they 
pay (if they repay at all). 

The scarcity of the year and the stress of hard times made stealing more com- 
mon than we have ever before known it in these parts. And into this sin a number of 
the Christians have fallen. The freight trains were climbed, and from the running 
trains bags of grain were thrown off, and men gathered from far and near to divide 
the spoils. -The man throwing off the bags was paid a rupee per bag for his part of 
the game. The freight train came to be known as grandmother, because she had 
something for all! This stealing was carried on at an alarming rate for some months, 
and it seemed nothing could be done to stop it for a time, but I am assured that it 
is not now being done. Of course, this was dreadfully hard on morals, and when men 



22 Annual Report 

had no income, and nothing in the house to eat, it became a great test of faith to 
refuse to join the gang and have something to eat in the morning. 

It is a difficult problem to deal with. One young Christian was asked if he did 
not want to join the gang. He thought he would try it. They sent him to get a tin 
of ghee from a freight car, which was standing on the track. He got it and carried 
it off. Members of the gang were witnesses. Next night they called him to go on 
another expedition, but he had a conscience which had been at work meanwhile, so 
he refused. Then, fearing lest he should tell on the gang, they made up a case against 
him for this tin of ghee, and got him into jail. I went to the jail and asked to see 
him. I said I was greatly surprised and awfully sorry to see him there, but all I 
could say now was that he might as well prepare to go to Ahma4ebad (state prison). 
Then I suggested, "Brother, may I advise you still?" He said yes, and I told him I 
did not wish to hear his story, but when he came into the courtroom, before the 
magistrate, he should tell the whole story. He agreed to do so. I said, " Never mind 
if you go to jail now, but tell the truth." He told the whole tale, and the magistrate was 
so glad to know the whole crookedness, he let him off, considering the extenuating cir- 
cumstances. He has been doing well ever since. He has learned his lesson. 

A lot of the Bhil Christians have gone to Mesopotamia to the labor corps, and 
others yet are going. It is a chance for them to break with their old life, and I have 
encouraged it rather than discouraged it, knowing that when they returned they would 
be changed, they would be better or worse, and a break with the dead and deadening 
life they had been living was essential to a better future, and so Mesopotamia was 
welcomed. The whole situation is rapidly changing. Instead of being content to re- 
main the lifelong slaves of a man who had lent them some money to get married on, 
they begin to seek wages, to look for better surroundings, to demand improved con- 
ditions, and backing their demand with their action, if they can't get it at home, they 
go elsewhere. These are local conditions in the taluka, but perhaps it would be safe 
to say that conditions of change are all over India, and this is a period of transition, 
a period of unrest and uncertainty, wherein it is good to be alert. It is good to be 
on the ground floor with the Word of Life, to be there first with the suggestion of 
the truth which works for cleanliness of a man, both within and without. A group of 
Christians came, wishing to go to the labor corps. I sent them home to talk with 
their wives and parents. After a few days they all came together, willing that the 
young men should go, and profuse in thanking me for my action. How we wish, 
again and again, that we might more speedily bring the day of the reign of righteous- 
ness throughout the world! To have more schools, and higher schools, and better 
schools; more homes and better homes and higher homes, more of Christ everywhere, 
for this we labor and for this we pray. 

REPORT OF S. IRA ARNOLD 

The year began as a famine. It was not the kind of famine that we had read 
of our pioneer missionaries experiencing years ago — indeed, we were spared the 
horrors of such sights — but yet it was real famine. The lack of rains, the failure 
of crops, had foretold the hard times to come, but the splendid government and 
mission relief that was offered bridged over the crisis in a way that called for praise 
from all who worship at the feet of him who doeth all things well. 

It had been decided to put forth most efforts in the saving and helping of children. 
A babies' home was to be opened in Vali, our own station. This called for buildings. 
A line of temporary rooms was made of poles, set in the ground, and split bamboos, 
tied on sides and top. The sides were then plastered with native plaster and the top 
covered with native tiles, and good, livable rooms resulted. Thus the old brick rooms 
of the teachers were made available for the more helpless children, and the teachers 
occupied the new quarters. 



Annual Report 



23 



This work finished, we at once started erecting a similar temporary building 
for boys' boarding-school, which was rapidly increasing far beyond the capacity of the 
then unfinished brick building. Brick had to be made for the extending of this un- 
finished building, lest the rains catch us with more boys than we could properly house, 
and disaster result. 

The boys' boarding-building is located on a beautiful little hill, or rather a bluff, 
facing the jungle and creek, several hundred yards from the bungalow. As there was 
only one well in the village the water for cooking had to be hauled in a 125-gallon tank 
that we had purchased for the purpose. It answered well so long as the native cart 
did not break, and yet the daily performance of this task kept several boys from 
industrial work or other profitable employment. So we hoped for a well at the board- 
ing-school and began work on the same. At the driest month of this dry year we 
had two feet of water in this new well at a depth of thirty-five feet, and hoped that 
during normal years this would prove sufficient for the boarding. For well walling, 
brick is the only material available here, so we aimed to have one hundred thousand 
brick burned near the well and building. 

The kiln of brick was burned and the bricks taken out. Some were placed 
near the well for its prospective wall, 
and the remainder near the unfinished 
building. The masons put up the walls 
and the carpenters the roof structure. 
The potters came, and on their oriental 
wheels they made for us about fifty thou- 
sand tiles, and our building was under 
roof. Then came the wall for the well. 
The brick had lain at the well for sev- 
eral weeks, and as we began the work 
we found that what seemed to be solid 
bricks were now nothing but powder. 
Fine limestone gravel in the clay had 
done the mischief. The heat had turned 
the stone to lime and the air had slacked the lime, causing the brick to crumble. Thus 
considerable expense and effort and our hopes for a well wall crumbled to dust. We 
attempted to protect the well from caving during the rains by building a roof over 
it. But in spite of all we could do it caved, and now the poles and palm-leaves of the 
roof, together with several tons of the surface soil, are at the bottom and the wall 
unfinished. We hope for bricks this year, that the well may be completed. 

As the summer passed our boarding-school increased. Many boys came to us, 
both from our own state and from Anklesvar. The maintenance fund intended for 
seventy boys was well taxed in caring for 125. But the kind help sent by our brethren 
in America made it possible that we need turn no boys away. The number has since 
the last rains dropped to less than one hundred, which make a very nice bunch of -boys 
for an educational and industrial school. In connection with this school are about 
twenty acres of land, which, by the aid of a few helpers, are tilled by the boys. 
Cotton, rice and juar are the crops this year, all of which promise to be fairly good. 
The beginning of a carpenter shop also offers training for part of the boys, but all 
must do some work in the fields. 

One of the first real famine relief efforts that we made was the giving of one meal 
each day to the children who attended the mission schools in the several villages 
around about. This was really begun in December of the previous year, and con- 
tinued until July, 1919. The expense was considerable, but we think it a good in- 
vestment. By it over one hundred children in six schools were helped to continue 
under the Christian teacher, when otherwise they would have been taken out of the 
school for the few pennies they might have earned each day to help support the family. 




Ready for the Rain 



24 Annual Report 

i 

As the famine grew more severe the people came to us for aid. They would 
bring anything they could get that we would buy. They brought us coarse grass 
to put on our roofs to protect us from the excessive heat. They brought us bam- 
boos by the thousands; each person bringing from ten to forty bamboos tied in a 
bundle on his head. They brought us mats woven from bamboos until we could buy 
no more. They brought, us knives, plow points, diggers, hoes, pieces of iron, brass 
vessels, jewelry, and everything they could spare from their poorly-equipped houses 
to sell and get food. They brought their women, and had the much-treasured ankle 
rings cut from their feet for the price of their brass in money or rice. For many 
days we cut ankle rings from the feet of women, each woman having four rings 
weighing from two to six pounds per set. Some of the rings seemed to be new, while 
others showed signs of age, being worn nearly half in two. The rings are generally 
cut by the blacksmith, who places the ring on the edge of the anvil and cuts with a cold 
chisel and hammer, at considerable danger to the ankle of the wearer. But at this 
work I became quite efficient. Setting the woman on the floor I sat down beside her. 
The. ring being held securely by a pair of wooden carpenter clamps, I cut with a 
hack-saw, releasing the foot from its bond without danger to the wearer. It is 
amusing to see a woman attempt to walk immediately after being released from three 
pounds of brass from each foot. Especially does the embarrassment to the woman 
increase with the number of spectators. The old brass rings can be sold at the shops 
for half the price of new brass, but we have kept most of them, a hundred pounds or 
•so, and are prepared to supply you with such relics as your needs may require. 

The people came to us for work, as much as we could give them. As a result 
of their efforts we now walk from our bungalow to the boarding-school on a stone 
and gravel road, and during the muddiest weather the trip may be made with soiling 
only the bottoms of one's shoe soles. 

One of the most serious aspects of the famine was the scarcity of grain, es- 
pecially rice. For a time it seemed unavailable; at least, government having it in 
control, was unable to effect perfect distribution. By special favor of our king we were 
given rice at reasonable prices when our dealers could not get it for double the 
money. And in this matter the effort of the dealers to induce me to buy rice in my 
name and supply them for their profit, was not wanting. 

The work of famine relief brought me into acquaintance with a young Hindu 
law student, Mr. Maganlal T'vyas. He was giving several months of his time and 
efforts to the distribution of rice at prices the people could afford to pay. For a 
while he managed no less than four shops in different parts of the state. The 
amount of rice per day to any one person had to be limited to the day's needs for 
that person, lest a few would get all and many get none. However, learning of our 
feeding schoolchildren in the villages he very kindly allowed the Christian master to 
take several days' supply for his school. Another incident I may relate here. There 
was no cheap grain shop in Umalla. So this Hindu gentleman was induced to send 
one hundred bags there for sale, entrusting it to a shopkeeper for sale. On the first 
day of the sale I met Mr. Maganlal at the station. By his request I went with him to 
see how the shop was running. As we arrived a woman was leaving with one rupee's 
worth of rice tied up in a cloth. He called her back and had the rice weighed again 
in his presence, finding it half a pound less than the proper amount. He ordered her 
to be given full weight, and turning to me said, "That is the way these shopkeepers 
do when we trust anything into their hands. Can you take this grain and sell it, 
or can you let me have a Christian man to oversee the selling of it?" His latter 
suggestion was the more easily complied with, and, wisely or unwisely, I allowed one 
of our teachers to go. For three days he watched that the Hindu merchant gave 
good measure to those who came for rice. 

The Hindu gentleman urged me much to open a cheap grain shop. He would 
supply the rice at the uniform price. Any extra expense in long-distance hauling would 



Annual Report 25 



be borne by the committee, but I should have to take at least one or two carloads of 
rice at a time. As I had not sufficient famine relief money in hand to do this I had 
to leave him to his good work, and I do what I could in other ways. 

The man who sold his plows to buy food, sold his bullocks for a mere trifle, or 
allowed them to starve, would not be able to cultivate his land the next rains. Seeing 
this we thought good to make loans to many as per their needs to bridge them 
over the hard times. Usually all the people from one village would come together. for 
their money. All were required to sign the same paper, each one going security 
for the others and promising to repay in three years, one-fifth to be repaid the first 
vear, two-fifths the second and third years. Thus a goodly number of people were 
kept in position to put out crops as the rains came on, and a considerable amount 
of money is out to be collected as the time arrives. 

During the year the Bible School opened at Bulsar. To this we sent four of our 
strongest workers. Later a class was opened for those who had failed to pass the full 
government standards of the common schools. To this we sent four. Losing thus 
eight of our best workers leaves our villages very poorly manned for the present. 
Substitutes were found for some, and others closed or consolidated with near-by 
schools. It is hard on the work now, but we hope for better service when the teachers 
return more fully prepared. 

During the year fifteen men and seventeen women were baptized in the Vali 
church, not all living in Vali, but from eight villages. Every village in which there 
are indigenous Christians, and one new village, have baptisms to report this year. 
Besides these thirty-two, about ten were baptized in the Amletha church, which is a 
part of this station. Of these baptisms the most part are adults. Among them are 
whole families and many heads of families. For this increase we rejoice and pray 
the Father to keep all faithful to his cause. A few people were baptized early in 
the year, but during the famine time we refused baptism, encouraging them to wait 
until after the monsoon, lest they should come with improper motives. One who 
received baptism during the year has already gone to her eternal home. 

Yes, the angel of death has claimed his portion from among our people this 
year. Not so many were adults, but many were children. Improper nourishment and 
disease rendered them fit subjects to succumb to the scourge of dysentery and cholera 
that followed during the monsoon. A line of nearly thirty mounds of stone in our 
cemetery marks the resting places of their little forms. Among them our own dear 
little boy answered the Savior's call and is now with Jesus. This loss has been our 
supreme sacrifice, and the wound seems to grow deeper as the months go by. But 
perhaps the little grave on the hillside may be our greatest contribution to God's 
cause in this land. Our boarding-school has been spared. One boy died of consumption 
several months after leaving the school. But to date, since its beginning, there have 
been no deaths in our school. The good health of our boys we ascribe largely to 
the splendid medical care given them by Sister Himmelsbaugh. 

As the year passes out we await the coming of Bro. Holsopple and family, who are 
now at Dahanu nursing their little girl, who became ill of fever on the ship several 
days before they landed in Bombay. May the Lord bless them as they take up the 
work that has been dear to us during the past three and a half years. 



REPORT OF ELIZA B. MILLER 

Girls' Boarding-school, Anklesvar 

The year of 1919 will be remembered as the year in which the main girls' boarding- 
school was moved to Anklesvar. This event took place about April 1. This brought 
together the forty girls from Bulsar and the forty at Anklesvar — and in one day the 
family was doubled in number. It took some time to get all settled and acquainted 
with one another. On account of famine conditions and as a result of the influenza 



26 Annual Report 

epidemic, a number of new girls were admitted from the villages, so that the number 
at its height reached 115; but the average of the year, and the number with which the 
year closes, is 100. For more than this we scarcely have room. As yet, land for 
the new buildings has not been secured; so we remain in temporary quarters. 

For the first time in twenty years cholera found its way into the school, and two 
girls — new ones from the villages — became victims to the dread disease. Besides 
these losses from cholera we lost one girl from dysentery, one from typhoid fever, 
and, just as the year was closing, two from influenza. On account of epidemics, the 
school several times during the year had to be closed and girls who had parents were 
sent home. Altogether, our records show considerable irregularity, a repetition of 
which we hope need not be experienced in the years following. 

In the boarding-school one matron looked after the general welfare of the girls 
for the most of the year. The past few months, however, an assistant especially to 
look after the smaller girls was brought in. Six teachers were regularly employed 
in the day-school and six grades above the kindergarten were kept going all the year. 
Three of these teachers are normal trained. We hope to have a full staff of trained 
teachers soon. 

Along with the regular government curriculum, Scripture lessons are given every 
day in every class. All the girls also entered the Sunday-school examination in July, 
and a goodly number passed. Memorizing Scripture and becoming acquainted with 
the Bible and the Bible stories make up the large portion of the religious course in 
the school. A regular drawing teacher to give one hour a week to each class was 
also employed for a part of the year. 

REPORT BY KATHRYN ZIEGLER 
Village Work in the Anklesvar' District 

January 4 one of our Bible graduates, his wife and I, started out touring in the 
villages. We pitched our tents in the villages where we have Christians, and remained 
about one week at a village. During this time we visited as many of the near-by 
villages as we could, and we usually went in the morning, also taking with us Gospels 
and tracts to sell. Much time was spent in the village where we stayed, doing 
personal work about which I have often said, and will say again, that the most effectual 
work is done this way. In the evening there always were services at the tent, and on 
the whole we had good attendance and attention. One often has to pity these people 
and at the same time be surprised, to see how they will sit in the cold for two and 
three hours, in their scanty clothing, when we shiver dressed properly. 

During January and February we pitched our tent in seven villages and visited 
twenty other villages, and when it was too hot to live in the tent we stayed in our 
house for most of a week, the mission house in one of the villages, where several 
years ago we had splendid work, but on account of some trouble no teacher could 
live there, or was afraid to live there. The Christians scattered, some for fear, and 
others because they could get no employment from the people who are in the majority 
there and who are some of our greatest enefnies in our work among the Bhil people. 
One wishes and prays that, after a good sermon has been preached and some good 
impressions made, the enemy will not come and destroy it all. But come he does, 
not, however, always succeeding in destroying all the good that has been done. Not 
long ago we had gon.e to a village and had a short meeting with the Bhils. Some of 
those who opposed us came near enough to hear what was being said. When we 
were at the edge of the village a woman called after us, asking if we taught the Bhils, 
who would follow their plows? That is why they oppose us, that is why it hurts, for 
in many cases, not in all, when we get these people to become Christians they also 
have a desire for more comforts, of which very few who are slaves know anything. 
But there are some exceptions in this, too. 

Well, the devil has his way often for a little while, but it never lasts long; he 



Annual Report 



27 



loses and God gains the victory, though our hearts are often made sad to think of 
the many that leave this world unsaved, that should have been won for the Master, 
and would have been, had they had the courage to stand for Christ. The gathering 
in of these people is not what we would like it to be, and what you would love to 
hear. But we must pray and PRAY more earnestly, and I ask every reader of the 
Visitor to join us in prayer in behalf of these needy people, that they may come 
out from under the yoke of bondage, confess their Savior and become men and 
women after God's own heart. 

Bulsar 

REPORT BY A. W. ROSS 

Bulsar Church 
At the beginning of the year there were 215 members in this church. During the 
year sixteen were received by certificate and eleven by baptism. Thirty-two were 
given certificates, leaving a membership at the end of the year of 210. 



& 




Bulsar Church, from Northwest, Showing, at the Rear, Home of Bible Students 

Two love feasts were held during the year, and council meetings as the need 
arose. It is interesting to note that the lay membership here is taking an increasing 
part in the work of the church. There was a day when most of the church activities 
were carried on by the teachers and mission agents, but here at this place we have 
quite a number of families who are carpenters, workmen on the railroad, and in various 
lines of business. There is a marked increase in their financial ability, though as yet 
most of our people are landless. A Hindu one day remarked that one of the great 
problems we have before us is that of assisting our people to become property owners. 

It is most unfortunate for the community that for various reasons prices of suit- 
able lands in the vicinity have increased so in value. In the early days of the mission, 
land here near us could be bought for less than $50 per acre, but now it has gone 
up to $2,000 to $3,000 per acre, and hard to get at that. 



28 Annual Report 

During the year one of our Indian ministers, Naranji Valji, moved to the Jalalpor 
church. % He had been at Wankal, but came back here to complete his Bible course. 
The minister who was here, Lellubhai Kalidas, took his place at Wankal, and Govindji 
Kenghar came from Anklesvar here to become assistant in the Bible School. He also 
has pastoral care of the church, though as yet this church has not assumed the responsi- 
bility of supporting a pastor^ Last year the question relative to support of pastors, 
was sent to the District Meeting, and a committee is to report a plan. It is hoped 
that our churches will soon be able to support their own pastors and finance their 
own work more and more. 

During the year the contributions of this church amounted to more than $200, 
counting at the rate of old exchange. This, besides, contributing to the general fund 
taken up at the time of our special meetings for the deepening of the spiritual life, in 
the month of November. This fund amounted to nearly seventy dollars, all of which 
was given for the car fare and support of the special evangelist, V. V. David, of 
Bangalore. The mission made considerable endeavor to have as many come as possible 
for these meetings. Many received great blessings, and we feel thai the meetings 
were worth many times what they cost in cash. More than 200 of the boarding 
children of the mission were present, and to many of them it was a continuous spiritual 
feast, the like of which they had never heard nor seen. From our village boarding at 
Wankal forty non-Christian boys came in. They were much drawn to the Christian way. 
We hope and trust that we may be able to arrange to have such meetings each year. 

Evangelistic 

During the year the eastern part of the Jalalpor field has be^n under my care. It 
gives me pain to have to report that I have been unable to go to the villages often, 
nor for any length of time. My duties have been too many, but the Lord has blessed 
the work in his own way. Quite a number of boys from this area went to the board- 
ing school at Wankal, and several of these have been baptized. 

There is nothing that would give me more joy than to shift the work of the 
station to other shoulders and then plan for an intensive campaign in the villages, 
giving my time and thought to the village work. Nor would I spend all my time in 
merely preaching the Gospel, but would try and touch the everyday life of the people, 
helping them to understand their rural problems better, helping them to better methods 
of agriculture and to encourage them to send their children to school. I would want a 
well-selected series of slides on the various forms of life activities. It would be 
splendid if one could have a well-trained staff of Indian workers, who could thus 
move from place to place with the missionary. But where is the missionary who is 
free for such work, and where are the Indian men who can be spared? 

Much of the evangelistic work centers around and through the various village 
schools. The men who supervise these schools are supposed to use the opportunity 
for teaching the Gospel truths and for touching the lives of the people. However, 
too often both supervisor and teacher think their work stops with the school proper. 

At Wankal is the most effective evangelistic agency in the area. Here we have 
over fifty boys from the villages.. Their parents are not Christians, but belong to the 
aboriginal classes and are practically without a religion and religious leader. However, 
up to recently these people have stood aloof from us. Because of prejudices, most large- 
ly gotten from others, at first we were not able to carry much of a religious propaganda 
in connection with this school, but close contact with our better Christians in charge 
of the school, and Christian teaching, has won the children and has also dispelled 
the fear and prejudices from the minds of many people, and now even the Rajputs 
of the village, who are High castes, some of whom are very poor, are asking to avail 
themselves of the advantages accruing from the boarding. Owing to some practical 
difficulties we have not yet accepted any of these boys, though they have approached 
us several times on the subject. 



Annual Report 29 

In June there were fifty-seven boys enrolled in the boarding. Several of them asked 
for baptism, and after some time four of them were baptized. For two days there was no 
difficulty whatever, but at the end of that time the camp began to show some stir, 
and on the morning of the fifth day Bro. Lellubhai and his assistants found that thirty 
of the boys had run off. They were made to believe that they would now become 
defiled, since some of them were Christians. 

In a few days several of the runaways came back and others later, while new ones 
also came, which was encouraging, and after two months we had about the same 
number we had before. However, we were sorry to lose one or two of the most 
promising boys. But we cannot say they are lost, for we hear from them and they 
are more interested than ever and in time we can hope will be with us in the faith. 

After some weeks the person who had encouraged the boys to run away left the 
vicinity of the boarding, and there was marked interest manifest among the boys in 
Christian teaching. Christmas day four more were baptized. None ran off this time, 
and we can now hope that we have reached the top of the hill and can look down over 
plains of humanity in these districts and see multitudes of these people coming to 
the Lord. 

It is encouraging to know that one of the converts is from Dharampor State, fur- 
ther interior, in which is a population equal to the membership of the Brethren Church. 
He is the first fruits from this interior country, almost altogether inhabited by people 
of his own kind. 

Education 

Bro. Eby will give a report of the educational work of the main school. My account 
covers only the village schools and Wankel. 

Half or more of these schools are in the area turned over to me when Bro. Emmert 
left for America. Including Wankel, there were nineteen of these schools in the 
villages. While there is a marked interest among the high castes for education, as 
yet the bulk of the backward classes do not send their children to the schools. How- 
ever, even among these backward classes there is a growing interest and one is sur- 
prised to see some of them holding prominent places. It was interesting to find 
in East Jalalpor an English school right out among the cotton fields, as a result 
of cooperative effort on the part of the villagers. There is a move on foot by the 
same people to build a hostel in connection with the high school here at Bulsar. 

The village schools are not very successful, largely 'due to lack of proper training 
on the part of the teachers. This we hope to remedy as rapidly as possible. Once 
our Normal is properly launched, one of our first tasks will be to give special train- 
ing to a large number of unqualified teachers. 

At Wankel the school was maintained at good attendance throughout the year, 
though there was considerable irregularity, as there is always in the beginning of an 
institution for village children. 

Efficient teachers is the key to better schools, and the mission will put forth every 
effort to increase the efficiency of the teaching staff. 

Industrial 

There is marked interest in industrial education among all classes. Many of the 
educated are now seeing that mere literary education is not meeting the needs of 
India, and there is growing demand for industrial education. And the need becomes 
more apparent when we take into consideration the fact that compulsory education 
which is being introduced affects those who are least able to afford it, and consequently 
if the education the children get does not increase their earning capacity, as well 
as their wants, their last condition will be worse than their first. 

Our mission has been trying to make the industrial work practical, and there has 
been no attempt to make a show. It has been found that in too many schools the 
children learn the theory only. We try to have our boys and girls learn to make 



30 



Afihual Report 



practical objects, and as a result of this effort quite a number of boys are now efficient 
carpenters, gardeners, etc. 

At this writing we have a dozen boys in the carpentry and an equal number in the 
tailoring department, while all the little boys and several of the large boys are in the 
agricultural work. A few are learning to do domestic 1 service. 

Boarding 

During the rains there were a few more boys than now. Several had come 
from the villages around Jalalpor, but they went home and we have not been able to 
get them back. There are now eighty boys here. One of our former orphans is the 




Bulsar Boarding Boys Learning Tailoring 

house master and he is proving to be very efficient, though not as far along in school 
as some others. He also has charge of the garden work and the tailoring. We would 
hardly know how to pull on with our many duties were it not for his help. He is 
on the job every day, looking after the many details of the work. There were no deaths 
among the boys during the year, though in August we had several cases of pneumonia. 
The Lord be praised for the work of another year! Often do we feel that much 
is left undone, and yet in spite of our shortcomings the work goes on and there is 
progress, for which we praise his name. To him be all the glory! 



REPORT OF A. T. HOFFERT 

Previous to Oct. 1 I was living at Anklesvar. Now my home is at Bulsar. This 
is the fourth station where I have lived for a period of several months, or longer, 
during the past three years. About half of my time was put to further language 
study. Reporting India happenings for the Gospel Messenger, advocating the tem- 
perance cause and assisting in the work of the station where I was living, kept me 
occupied the rest of the time. To me was also given the task of collecting the statis- 
tical reports of the India Mission, which are to appear in the June Visitor. This in 
.brief is my report, and not much more need be said. 

My home with the Stover family at Anklesvar was certainly a privilege, an oppor- 
tunity, "a help and an inspiration. The fatherly and motherly attention that was 
shown me, which could not be shown to the three absent ones of their own family; 
ithe opportunity of learning from their wide experience; the help of their wise 
♦counsel, and the inspiration of their lives from which, as it were, flow rivers of living 



Annual Report 



31 



water, have been a privilege — rare indeed — which will ever beckon me on to larger 
and better service in the kingdom of our Lord. One of the rewards of missionary 
service is the opportunity it gives to become closely associated with strong, capable, 
large-hearted, self-sacrificing men and women. 

The temperance work, as yet, has not been sufficiently organized. Few of our 
Indian workers know how to go ahead in this work without the help of the missionary. 
Temperance programs were held at most of our stations. Many signed the temper- 
ance pledge, but in this only a beginning has been made. From month to month 
temperance notes have been published in the Prakash Patra. There is promise of 



J /• 





Class of Boarding Boys Ready for the Garden, Bulsar 



greater things along temperance lines during the coming year. India's progress in 
every way will be hastened by the overthrow of the liquor traffic. There is an oppor- 
tunity here to get well-prepared temperance material in the secular press. Some of 
this has been done. Indian sentiment is in favor of prohibition, but until the temper- 
ance work becomes better organized this sentiment will not become crystallized into 
action. 

REPORT OF E. H. EBY 

The joy of getting back into the work after so many years off the field was 
such as few have experienced. Work in plenty was waiting us, and at an early date 
a goodly portion of responsibility for station activities was placed upon us. In way of 
relief of the overworked staff we took over at once the Sunday evening meeting, 
which is held in English for the benefit of missionaries and the English-speaking rail- 
way officials who wish to attend. The railway community, lying only across the street 
from the mission, presents a field for service which should engage our attention 
for the safety of our Christian community, if for no other reason. It is a community 
of some three thousand, living close together, for whom nothing of a constructive 
nature is being done, and on account of its proximity we should feel for it deep concern. 
Because of the varied nature of the people in race and religion there is but one insti- 



32 Annual Report 

tution which can reach all; that is a Y. M. C. A. The writer is very eager to interest 
some one in this fine field of work. 

The Boarding and Day-School 

We took charge of this institution early in the year. The day-school numbered 
some eighty-five at the beginning of the year, and within the year the enrollment grew 
to over 150. Eight teachers were employed in the school. A change of teachers 
in several grades was necessary and was a source of annoyance and damage to the 
pupils. In September the seventh standard boys were removed to Jalalpor and put 
into a class preparing for the vernacular final examination. Several public programs 
were arranged throughout the year, in which the boys showed considerable ability in 
declamation and dialogue. There were a temperance, Christmas eve, and a peace 
program. Along with the regular school work the boys, are taught gardening, car- 
pentering, and tailoring. 

The Bible School 

In June the Bible Teacher Training School opened again with an enrollment of 
twenty-eight. Two terms of five months each will be held in a year. This will enable 
the students to get a two years' course and return to work. Trained workers are a prime 
necessity. It is proposed to give our workers such a training as will enable them to 
enter sympathetically and helpfully into every phase of village life. They must be not 
only preachers, but teachers of the day or night village school, Sunday-school superin- 
tendent and teacher in one, the moral and social and even industrial heart of village 
life. Our Mission Training School offers training in all these lines, including also 
instruction in village hygiene and public health. 

Lecture courses were conducted for a time in agriculture and hygiene, while the 
students spent time in the shop learning the carpenter trade, so as to be more useful 
in the village. 

Besides the two lecturers the teaching staff consists of three regular teachers. It is 
hoped that a continual stream of young people may be found ready to pass through this 
course of training, and thus be fitted for effective work in the villages. 

The Language School 

In the absence of a united effort on the part of the missions of Gujarat to give 
new missionaries the best possible opportunity to learn the language, our own mission 
took up the matter and decided to offer our new workers the best possible facility 
for study. Accordingly an embryo language school was started, a teacher trained in 
the "direct method," and all are interested in the results. Other teachers will be ap- 
pointed as needed. Lectures will be given on the customs and religion of India. It 
is hoped that soon all the missions of Western India will join to form a first-class 
language school. No more important matter awaits the cooperation of the missions 
than this. The success or the failure of missionaries depends in large measure upon 
their success or failure to gain a working knowledge of the language. 

The B. Y. M. U. 

The past year has seen the organization of a society called the Bulsar Young Men's 
Union. It is composed of the students in the various schools, with a sprinkling of old 
men who hope to guide the movement into useful channels. The aim of the society is to 
offer opportunity to the young men and boys for self-activity and development intellec- 
tually, socially and morally. The writer, having given as much time as possible to -help 
in the first stages of the movement, was chosen first president of the organization. 
He is in a position to influence for good the 350 or more members of the union. Steps 
have been taken to found a public library. A lecture course has already been started 
and several excellent lectures delivered in the city. Other lines of activity await devel- 
opment. 

The future is throbbing with life and hope. The spirit of achievement is regnant in 



Annual Report 33 

Indian life. The desire for freedom cannot be suppressed. It must be guided. Who will 
be the guides? is the paramount question. The missionaries enjoy the respect and con- 
fidence of the community. Unobtrusive leadership is the need of the day and is within 
our reach if we will accept opportunity and the responsibility. We must have men 
and women of commanding influence. If we fail of this opportunity the days of the 
missionary in India are numbered. Leadership will arise from other sources and we 
shall be cast out as refuse. NOW is the day of opportunity. 

REPORT BY DRS. A. RAYMOND AND LAURA M. COTTRELL 
Bulsar Medical Report 

Could you spend a morning with us in the dispensary and hospital it would be easier 
for you to understand what is being done. Patients of all classes come in all manner 
of conveyances and many styles of dress. Many walk from five to twenty miles to 
reach the dispensary. Each patient is required to bring his or her own bottle, and 
you might be amused some morning at the array of bottles to be seen on the desks. 

Were you to visit most mission hospitals in India you would be surprised at the kind 
of hospitals most common here. There are no nice wards or rooms immaculately clean; 
instead, you will see lines of ordinary rooms or wards, in which you will find the 
patients. Each one is clothed to suit his own individual taste; many on beds with inter- 
woven ropes for springs, and then a thin pad or a piece of matting for a mattress. Some 
beds have springs, and many patients and their friends are to be seen sleeping on the 
floor. The other members of the family are usually present and bring a miscellaneous 
assortment of cooking vessels, supplies, boxes, etc., which are distributed about on the 
floor — truly an amazing sight for a hospital! After awhile you come to realize that their 
bedding and clothes are moderately clean, and that the usual association of dirt and dis- 
order does not always hold in these cases. Patients allowed to live in their own way are 
much happier; it makes less work for the doctors and nurses and the expense is much 
less. Most patients are grateful for what has been done for them. Physical healing is 
one of the quickest and best means of reaching people's hearts and souls. 

All kinds of diseases are here. Malaria we always have with us; pneumonia is very 
prevalent. Then there are plague, cholera, smallpox, influenza, tuberculosis in all its 
forms, skin infections of all sorts and degree, and the long list of diseases, Many 
surgical cases come, many of which we are forced to send away because of inadequate 
means of caring for them. Some who come are pitiable sights, the victims of ignorance 
and neglect. Some things we are forced to do and dare, and it is wonderful how the 
Lord has blessed our efforts. 

Many visits are made in the homes of both Christians and non-Christians, which 
not only afford opportunity for relieving physical suffering, but also to enter into the 
home-life of the people and to help lighten the unthinkable heart miseries which only 
the message of Christ can relieve. 

It has been our desire to have the gospel message given to all who come to the 
hospital and dispensary. This important department of the work was in charge of an 
Indian brother and his wife until April, 1919,' when they were transferred to other 
work. At the opening of the Bible Training School in June it was thought that the 
evangelistic work in the dispensary could be done by the students as a part of their 
practical training, but for several reasons the students have not been able to do the work 
satisfactorily. We look forward to again having a full-time evangelist and his wife for 
this exceedingly important work. Remember this phase of the work in your prayers, 
that it may be efficiently cared for. During the year some hundreds of tracts have been 
sold and given free to patients and their friends. 

In June, 1919, R. B. Jerome, a graduate of the Mission Medical School at 
Miraj, was added to the staff of helpers. There is but one Indian nurse, Faithbai, 
who has been with us for two and one-half years. Her husband, K. S. Charles, dis- 



34 Annual Report 

penses the medicines. Other assistants about the hospital render helpful service. 
One boy is in training in the American Presbyterian Hospital at Miraj for com- 
pounder and dresser. On completion of his course he is expected to return for work 
here. Two girls are studying English in a Girls' High School, looking forward to 
being students in the nurses' training school which we hope to organize under Miss 
Mohler's efficient direction. 

The two rooms in the bungalow, which are fitted for caring for sick missionaries, 
have proved to be a great blessing. Not only fellow missionaries have been cared 
for, but we have also been able in several cases to extend this blessing to mission- 
aries of neighboring missions. 

The work at the beginning of and during the year has been modified considerably 
because of the influenza epidemic at the close of 1918. India suffered severely during 
this pandemic. Indian official estimates are that there were 5,000,000 deaths in this 
country alone due to this disease at this time. The death rate among our native 
Christians was considerably less than the average, for which we praise the Father. 
Another point of interest that might be mentioned is that the average death rate 
among Indian Christians, especially children, from all diseases is markedly less than 
that among the non-Christians. Even the non-Christian peoples speak of this. 

During our own illness while the influenza epidemic was raging the dispensary 
was in charge of native helpers, who faithfully did what they could to give out medi- 
cines to the suffering ones. Because of this epidemic the figures for last year show 
larger than for this. It was necessary to close the work for a time while we were 
regaining our strength in the hills, and this accounts for the somewhat lessened 
figures for this year's work in comparison with that of last year. 

Following are the statistics for nine and one-half months of the calendar year: 

New, 4,405 

Patients 

Repeats, 10,677 

Total, 15,082 

In-patients, 180 

Average number per day, .- 62 

Obstetrical cases, 33 

Minor operations, 424 

Receipts, Rs. 9, 345-9-0 or $ 4,248 

REPORT OF MRS. E. H. EBY 
Schoolchildren of Missionaries 

The school year of 1919 began March 20 and closed Dec. 10. The girls attended 
Wellesley Girls' High School and the boys Philander Smith College, beautifully located 
on the shores of a refreshing lake in Naini Tal, a city of the Himalaya Mountains. 

Both these schools are under Christian (Methodist) direction, being supported by 
Mission Boards and established for Christian education. 

Eleven of our children entered school, eight of whom remain for the year; the 
other three returning home with their parents at the close of the hot season. During 
the year our home was visited by minor diseases, such as chicken pox, measles, and 
mumps, all of which proved very light and required the children to be absent from 
school less time than official quarantine. 

The eight children who remained in school the year won six prizes, although 
three of these were forfeited because the girls could not remain for the closing days 
of school. 

We were all glad for vacation, when for three full months our childfcen could 
remain on the plains with their parents. Their vacation is much enjoyed and passes 
all too quickly for them. 



Annual Report 35 

We are very thankful for the deep interest you all take in the problem of edu- 
cating our children on the mission field. 

Pray for us in this necessary separation during the school year. 

Dahanu 

REPORT OF J. M. PITTENGER 

A missionary finds many questions that puzzle him as to how they are to be solved 
and as to what will result from their solution. To write his yearly report is not, by 
any means, the very least of these questions. 

The past year has been one of many changing scenes, full to the utmost with the 
duties which arise each day for the missionary. The first three months were taken 
largely in looking after the building work then in progress. In addition to the build- 
ing erected for the Girls' Boarding School, there was a line or ward of five rooms 
built for the medical work, and a house in each of two villages for the school started 
in them. Besides this, there was much repairing to be done on buildings previously 
erected. 

At the beginning of April, at the recommendation of our medical committee, we 
went to Naini Tal, in North India, for a change of climate and needed rest. Here we 
remained until July 8, but did not receive the hoped-for benefit. However, the last 
three weeks of the sojourn did bring about a change for the better, and I am very 
glad to write that this improvement continued after our return to Dahanu. Overseeing 
the schools, looking after the spiritual welfare of the new converts, directing those who 
preach the Word of Life, and looking after the other numberless duties that come each 
day leave no idle moments for him who wishes to see grow the work which has been 
given him by the Lord. 

India's people have very many holidays. They come with such frequency that one 
wonders how there can be any thing done, for those who have so many holidays also 
have the rule that they are to be properly observed by laying aside all labor and per- 
forming the rites prescribed for the proper observance of the day. There are two great 
holidays or holiday seasons which continue for days in succession. When these holidays 
come there is absolutely nothing else to be done but close each and all of the schools, 
for there will be not a single pupil present, even though the teacher be present all the 
while. One of these holidays comes in the month of October. This gave the teach- 
ers an opportunity to engage in some other useful work, so it was decided to have 
them all come to Dahanu for a season of Bible study and prayer. Two weeks were 
thus spent and the interest and spirit manifested were splendid. There will be ex- 
cellent results from this half month of time thus spent. In a few days after this study 
closed, Tamil David, a well-known Christian from the area where the Tamil language 
is spoken in South India, came to us for a few days and gave us three sermons daily. 
They were simple and full of the Spirit's power. There was great searching of hearts, 
and many made confession of sins which have long been practiced but kept hidden 
from men. These who confessed have become free and so have a new lease of the 
power which has been withheld from them because of living in sin. We feel certain 
that the work which they have done so half-heartedly will now be a joy to them and 
have results commensurate with their newly-found joy and zeal with which they shall 
be enabled to work. 

During the interval between the period of Bible study and the evangelistic services, 
referred to above, we had the joy of receiving thirteen into church fellowship. These 
are all from villages not far away a>id constitute the first ingathering of as large a 
number as this at one time. The caste spirit is very strong here, and each of the ab- 
origines is bound not only by caste rules but also by one or more money lenders whose 
authority is more binding and galling even than the stringent caste rules. To become 
a Christian in such a community means most bitter persecution for a period of time, 
whose length and severity depend largely upon the strength of character of the convert. 



36 Annual Report 

Just following these baptisms, persecution broke in fury against others of the Christians 
who were not living upon the mission compound. One of these is an old man, a 
Mohammedan convert, who became a Christian when a young man. The Mohammedans 
of this community tried their utmost to persuade him to renounce his faith in Christ, 
without success. Living next door to this aged Christian are the two Christian 
teachers of the village school. They became the object of the caste men's vilest re- 
ports and insults, and, could these men have had things go their way, they would have 
driven not only these two teachers away but the entire Christian community. Such fury 
soon spends its strength, and so this persecution is becoming less day by day. While it 
has had its sad features, it has not been without some very blessed fruitage, for which 
we praise him who keeps, moment <by moment, those who trust and obey him. 

Cholera broke out in the Boys' Boarding School early in the year and caused its 
closure for some time. Several of the boys died from the disease. It was such a sad 
sight to witness their sufferings, and yet be unable to do but little to help them. Dr. 
Nickey rendered every service known to those versed in the art of medicine, yet they 
could not be saved. Of the number who died, several died just at the close of the day 
or soon after. This necessitated burial by night. It is peculiarly sad to attend to this 
last rite over the remains of loved ones at this time, and the memory of some of these 
experiences will linger with us as long as we dwell with men. 

In addition to this outbreak of the cholera, there were two others, one preceding 
and one following the one referred to above, but both occurred in the village adjoining 
the mission compound. However, the people came to the compound for treatment, 
and during both a number died there, two little babies dying in the mission bungalow 
while under the care of the sisters, who braved all dangers to render the help so 
urgently needed at the time. Such occasions are splendid tests of one's love for hu- 
manity and of his courage for 'and faith in his Lord's promises. But how wondrously 
do his angels pitch their camp about those who love and fear God! How blessed 
to experience this! 

Our standard of service and efficiency is the same as that given by our Lord and 
Master. Each day closes without our having attained to anything near what we should 
have attained, either in quality or quantity of work, and this is the record, of course, for 
the year. So a missionary, when he sits down to write his report, has to think of the 
greater number of things he did not and could not do, as well as the things he, by God's 
grace and help, was able to perform. And the latter, in comparison with the former, 
seem so few, that he is confronted with the question, "What, really, can I write that 
I have done? " But we are to be faithful in the things done or that we are able to do 
as the moments go by, and not to fret away time and energy about the things which 
lie beyond us, either as to time or power to perform. And we are so wondrously kept 
and blessed in doing our part, day by day, no matter how humble it may be considered 
by men. And, dear reader, this report, to you, may be a puzzle when you want to con- 
sider what was done by the one who has written it. The privilege is yours, of course, 
and yet let me beg you to take time and " read between the lines " the things which 
modesty says, " Do not write about that." Will you not pray that there may be 
much done, and there will really be no need to write about that. God knows how well 
or how poorly we serve him day by day, and when we all meet with him on the other 
shore, let us hope that he will be pleased to have us recount deeds there that he will 
permit us to recall as done here for "one of the least" of his but in his name. 

REPORT BY H. L. AND H. Z. ALLEY 
Our Second Year in India 
We think of 1919 as our second year in India, because it is now a little more than 
two years since we bade farewell to loved ones in America to come to this, our future 
field of service. Unavoidable delays en route made the date of our landing as late 
as March 23, 1918, so that it is nearly three months yet before we will have been two 
full years in India. 



Annual Report 



37 






The first two months of 1919 we spent in Poona studying the language. March, April 
and May we continued our study in the regular Language School at Mahableshwar, a 
hill station nearly five thousand feet above sea level. We found it much to our ad- 
vantage to be away from the extreme heat of the plains and in the school where the 
best pandits are to be had. The month of June we were again in Poona, and during 
the month we took our first year's examination. July we moved to Dahanu, where we 
could continue our study, observe the work of the experienced missionaries and their 
helpers here, and be used in any way that those in charge felt we could help in the 
work. The house that had been rented for us here was not finished, and so we spent 
the month of July in a government bungalow. At the end of the month this bungalow 
was needed by others, and 
as the other house promised 
by the owner for July 1 was 
not completed we moved 
into the mission bungalow 
with Bro. Pittenger's. Here 
we spent two months and 
finally moved into the new 
bungalow Oct. 1. Even then 
it was not entirely finished 
and scarcely dry enough to 
occupy. Being built, plas- 
tered, etc., during the mon- 
soon, the mortar-bed being 
made in the house on the 
earthen floor, it is little won- 
der that the house did not 
become dry until long after 
the monsoon was over. 

While living in the gov- 
ernment bungalow we were badly bitten by mosquitoes, and Sister Alley and the 
children took malaria. Sister Alley soon developed catarrhal jaundice and was 
confined to her bed for more than six weeks. It was some time before she got 
her usual strength fully back. On account of sickness and the necessity of moving 
so often during the monsoon we seemingly accomplished but little for several 
months after coming from Poona in July. However, from the first of October until 
the end of the year we had our teacher with us regularly and got our second year's 
work well on the way, besides helping in the work here what we could. 

We look upon the year's work as one of preparation for the real work of going 
out after the lost of this land, the work that brought us here and in which the coming 
year will find us more fully engaged. We shall continue our study as opportunity is 
afforded, but the majority of our time will now be given to other duties. To keep up 
with one's work one must continue to give some time to language study. 

We needed your prayers when our time was all given to language study, and we 
need them no less as we enter upon the duties before us. Our hands are stronger to do 
our Master's work because you pray. God grant that we may all realize the power 
we may wield through prayer! 




Famine Children, Umalla, via Anklesvar 



REPORT BY B. MARY ROYER 

The winter months are the best time of the year for intensive evangelistic work 
in the rural districts of India. Those who are engaged in that phase of the work are 
therefore usually on tour at the beginning of the new year. 

The first six weeks of 1919 my Bible woman and I were in camp in the southern 
part of our district. It has been our custom, thus far, to camp only in villages where we 



38 Annual Report 

have schools. During the day the Bible woman and I go into the homes and teach the 
women and children. In the evening we have services at the schoolhouse and the 
teacher does the preaching. Sometimes we are invited to private homes to hold serv- 
ices. Last year our work at this place was greatly hindered on account of the sick- 
ness and death of the teacher. However, the district was visited by the men's preach- 
ing band during the evangelistic campaign in February. 

On account of famine conditions, several girls were offered to us early in the 
year. This was the opportune time for starting the Girls' Boarding School to which 
we had been looking forward for some time. Sisters Swartz and Ebbert were 
planning to be away for the hot weather. So it became my lot to take charge of the 
girls. I was much pleased to have this opportunity, as work among the children is 
so much more promising than among adults. 

The first girls came to us early in February. There were only four, but the number 
increased to nine by July when the work was turned over to Sister Ebbert. It is most 
encouraging to watch the development of these raw jungly girls. To start, on the 
road to learning, children who have generations of ignorant and superstitious ancestry 
back of them, is somewhat different from starting beginners in a Christian country. But, 
given a start and a fair chance, most of them make rapid progress. 

While the Pittengers were away for a much-needed rest during the hot season, I 
also had some experience in station work. At this time the Girls' Boarding School 
building was erected. This work was given into the hands of Christian contractors, 
and with an occasional visit from Bro. Ross the work moved along nicely. 

During a part of October a Bible Institute was held here at the station. All the 
workers and their wives were here for two weeks. There were two classes, daily, for 
women. The men's classes were separate. The evening services were largely in charge 
of our Indian brethren. 

In December my Bible woman and I toured the northern part of our field. While 
we have no converts to report, we feel that our efforts have not been in vain. The most 
encouraging feature about the work was the interest manifested by the village school- 
teacher. He conducted the evening services, which were held in the schoolhouse. His 
messages were far beyond what we expected of him and he seemed to be really filled 
with the Spirit of God. A native worker of this type is a great asset to foreign missions. 
After all, it is he who must bring his fellow-countrymen to Christ. 'The work of the 
missionary is largely to train, supervise and encourage the native worker. 

Touring in the rural districts enlarges one's vision as regards the condition and 
needs of the masses of this country. The ignorance and superstition of the people and 
their indifference to higher and better things are most discouraging from the human 
point of view. The difficulties in the way for their development so far outnumber the 
possibilities. This is largely due to their indifference and to the lack of good workers. 
But as it requires far more time to regain health than it does to lose it, it will doubt- 
less require ages to undo what ages of ignorance and superstition have done for these 
people. 

When I remember him who bids us go, that all authority has been given unto him 
in heaven and on earth, and his gracious promise to be with us to the end, I take courage 
and thank him for permitting me to have a part in so great a work. Since my short 
experience of touring through the rural districts, I have a keener realization of the 
force of our Savior's words to his disciples when he said, " The harvest indeed is 
plenteous but the laborers are few. Pray ye therefore, the Lord of the harvest, that 
he send forth laborers into his harvest." 

REPORT BY E. EBBERT 

Dahanu Girls' Boarding School for 1919 

February 10, 1919, was a red fetter day for four little Warili girls named Zunkie, 

Tulshie, Munchie and Mungerlie; for it was on that day they came to live with the 

missionaries. These four girls, with Sister Royer and her Bible woman, Sunderbai, 






Annual Report 39 

compose the charter members of the Dahanu Girls' Boarding School. At first they 
lived in one room of a two-room grass hut which was erected just back of the ladies' 
bungalow. This room served as kitchen, dining-room, bedroom and schoolroom. A few 
weeks later Vagie came, and so on they kept coming until by July 1, at which time 
Sister Royer resigned her position in my favor, there were ten. In the meantime a per- 
manent building was being built, which was completed about the first of June, when the 
girls, with their new matron, Jumnabai, moved in. Later still others came, till by the 
end of the year there were sixteen, including two who later ran away. 

For a couple of months there were quite a number of day pupils, who came from 
one of our near-by villages. At one time there were as many as a dozen. But when some 
of the people on the compound began talking of becoming Christians they gradually 
ceased coming. They kept dropping out until there was only one left, and on the 31st of 
October, the day when four of the boarding girls were baptized, that one left. 

While some discouraging things like the above have happened, on the whole the 
school has made considerable progress, and the future looks very encouraging. Some 
of the girls have made splendid progress in their studies. Two, who began in March, not 
knowing a single letter of the alphabet, have finished the primer and the first book 
and are now reading in the second book. Practically all of them have learned to 
sew very nicely. They have sewing only one hour a day each week, except when 
they do not have regular schoolwork; then they have it every day. 

The girls as a whole are very happy in their new environment. Seven of them 
have become Christians and several more have asked; so, as soon as we think they 
are ready, we will receive them into the church. 

Pray for the work, that we may be able to reach the children here at our very 
door. So far most of the girls have come from villages from two to five miles dis- 
tant. Pray for these girls, that they may grow up to be useful workers in helping 
to win their own people to Christ. 

Jalalpor 

REPORT OF IDA C. SHUMAKER 

"Better late than never, but better never late" is a good old saying. Yes, I have 
heard the clarion call, "Send your report as soon as possible," Each day since I 
have tried to do so, with one hand on the ear, one eye on the big waves of fierce 
opposition whistling and roaring all around us for the past five months, and one 
ear "cocked" to hear the oncoming rush of the next attack and be ready to "head it 
off"; then to the work of trying to get a report ready to tell what has been done dur- 
ing the past year, when, listen! from another source comes a crowd from the village 
where we had a flourishing school and where the "enemy" almost succeeded in tear- 
ing it to pieces (this is only the result of the "fight" here in Jalalpor; the same forces 
are at work there that are at work here), reporting the latest development which, 
on this occasion, was the beating of the teacher. 

Everything stops, and to the work of settling this matter. Too many of our 
people, I regret to say, have not yet learned the spirit of the Master, "to suffer and 
be still." 

Here one comes on the run to tell what is going on here in Jalalpor, the "hotbed 
of this strong opposition," caused, as you already have been told, by the coming 
of a special class of students, from our various mission stations in Gujarati, to pre- 
pare for the Vernacular Final Examination in Surat in April, and their being admitted 
to the Government School in Jalalpor; which thing proved to be "the bone of con- 
tention" and set the fires of opposition to burning. True, this fire had been smoldering 
in the hearts of some for fifteen years, and this caused it to burst forth in all its 
fury, and we who are here now are the victims. We acted quickly in this matter and 
poured oil on the troubled waters. 

Now what! Here comes a policeman with a man who claims to be the father of 



40 Annual Report 

one of the little girls, who came to us in an awful condition nine months ago. He 
demanded that we give up that child at once. Well, there had been so much lying and 
trickery and deception practiced, with the desire to break up our boarding-school 
and our day-school, that we must be on the alert all the time to know how to act 
quickly and justly. This matter had to be looked into at once, for it was not our 
desire to have this child fall into a trap that may have been set to catch her, and 
then fall a victim to that which one trembles to think about, much less write. So 
this investigation is now going on. 

See the " house-master " in charge of the Girls' Boarding. He comes to report 
that one of our big girls was stolen away. She, along with one of the smaller girls, 
was getting flowers, leaves and vines which grow in our tank, just a few steps from 
where the rest of the girls were at work, for use in school. She lingered behind only 
a few minutes to secure more, after the rest had started towards the home for dinner, 
when evidently some one was lying in wait, and she was gone! The thing was done 
so quickly and so stealthily that no trace of her has been found. A few days before, 
some one appeared and said that this girl was his. The girl looked him squarely in 
the face and said, "I am not your child and you know it! I will not go with you!" 
All sorts of ways and means are being used and have been set in motion by the 
"enemy" to "oust the Christians" already here and to keep others from being Chris- 
tians. To tell the whole truth, this is all the work of no more than one man. The 
rest MUST follow their leader. 

After repeated efforts to get permission to start the building of our Girls' Board- 
ing-school, the laborers were finally secured and they were set to work. On their 
way home, after working a half day, they were met by a man who asked them if 
they did not want to go to Busra. That was the last we saw of those laborers. 

Just now I left this writing on learning that another of our larger-sized girls 
is missing. A search is being made for her. One must just "steel" her heart and go 
on bravely and trustingly, believing that all will come out right in the end. Thus I 
might go on, giving incident after incident — enough to "eat up" all the space — and 
then say, "The half has not been told." 

To be responsible for three persons' work is hard enough at a station where 
caste is so strong, and the doors are tightly closed against Christianity, when condi- 
tions are normal; but add to this the abnormal condition of the last five months, and 
you have a faint idea of what it has meant to "hold the fort" till relief comes. As 
we write we are trusting the Lord to send us the needed help ere you read these lines. 

Do we wish to tell you only the seemingly dark side? Nay, verily, for our 
prospects for this place "are as bright as the promises of God." He has wonderfully 
blessed the work, even during these "stormy times." When we began here, we decided 
that some wonderful blessings must be in store at this place, because of the way the 
adversary was working. What a stir there was when it was noised abroad that a 
"day-school has been started on the Padri Sahib's compound and they are repairing 
those old buildings for the purpose of starting a girls' boarding-school, and many 
of our people are going to the Padri Sahib's meetings on Sunday, too. This dare 
never be, for soon they will make Christians of all our children who go there, and they 
will get some of the parents, too, and then what will be the result? We must take 
steps at once to put a stop to this sort of a movement!" 

And they did "take steps," sure enough, and they have been taking them ever 
since; they have not left a stone unturned to stop this "sort of a movement." They 
find it a rather uphill business to "fight against God." We have been going on quietly 
and trustingly, yet very prayerfully- and watchfully, covering every inch of the ground 
on our knees, with " strong crying and many tears," and many " night vigils " 
and much wrestling with God in prayer. 

One night it seemed that the enemy was gaining on us and would prevail. After 
one of the hardest battles, when we were almost overwhelmed with the crushing 



Annual Report 41 

weight on our souls, and while crying out to God, our only Source of refuge and 
strength, suddenly there flashed out in the darkness these two bright stars of hope: 
"And I, if I be lifted up, will draw all men unto me." and, " Behold, I have set before 
thee an OPEN DOOR WHICH NO MAN CAN SHUT!" At once a fresh supply 
of that indomitable courage filled our hearts, joy unspeakable, and that "peace which 
passeth understanding," and "GRACE, WONDERFUL GRACE" was poured out 
upon us, and we set to work to press on with a still more determined purpose to 
win for the Lord. 

January 1, 1919, our membership was fifty, but only thirteen of these are within 
reach of the Sunday services. Our attendance has grown from twenty-one on the 
first Sunday (which is the lowest number) to 203, the highest number. There was but 
one class for the men, women and children. On the second Sunday we started three 
classes with eight men, eight women (with three babies) and two children, the children 
of our worker. The attendance gradually went up till we reached the highest number, 
thirty-four men, sixty-six women, and 113 children. This does not include the attend- 
ance on Christmas Day, when we had 189 present in Jalalpor; seventy-six in Machad- 
Khandarak. At this place we were especially thankful to God for this number, for 
here is where the "fight is on" and they had reduced this school down from ninety-eight 
on the register to one or two pupils. Now it is a " registered-grant-in-aid school," 
and we are gradually building up what the enemy has tried to "tear to pieces." Only 
the Father knows through what fires we have passed to get this accomplished, and 
to keep this good school going through all this storm, set in motion here as a result 
of the student question at Jalalpor. So we were so grateful to God for this number. 
We can appreciate what it meant to those people to send their children. 

At Bhat (o.ur other village school, where we had our Christmas program a day 
later, for we could not reach our four schools in one day) we had over 350 present. 
The house was so packed that we stopped counting when we had reached that number. 

The children did well also in their "All-India Sunday-school Examination" in 
July. These children here in Jalalpor were "raw children," so to speak, and of the 
thirty-five who were eligible to take the examination, there were only ten failures. 
Eleven of them passed with honors. Of this number, two of the boarding-school girls 
who were with us only three months (for we began our boarding-school with seven 
?irls April 1, 1919), each received 100 marks. This means that they were able to do 
the six months' Sunday-school lessons in the three months. There were several who 
received ninety-five marks. The average age of these children is six years. The ten 
who failed were not with the class very long. Now, does it pay? In Machad and 
Khandarak the results were not so good, because those children were without a com- 
petent teacher for the greater part of the time, yet there were twenty-four who 
passed. In the Bhat school, out of sixty-nine who took the examination there were 
twenty honors and nine first class. In all there were fifty-seven passes. There were two 
who passed with honors in the teachers' division also at Jalalpor. 

We began our day-school here on the compound January 20, 1919, with eleven 
boys and two girls. We reached the number sixty-five in attendance, though all 
names were not placed on the school register, for they were too young. Besides 
the seven Koli girls, who were the first to be enrolled in our boarding-school, we had 
in all forty-three different girls from the various castes — Koli, Dhordia, Duble and 
Nayaka castes. While we never had at any one time more than twenty-one girls in 
the boarding, because of the fierce opposition, and superstition concerning the educa- 
tion of girls, because of the way in which the parents were threatened with fines and 
imprisonment, with cruel beatings; and the fear of defilement, which means their being 
out-casted (and that, to them, is an awful calamity), and threats of various kinds, 
which in several cases were carried out; the stealing away of many of these 
girls against their own wills, and many more reasons which I cannot name to you, 
we kept the school and boarding going all the year. Our present number in the 



42 Annual Report 

boarding is fifteen girls, and we are glad to say we almost reached the number 
sixty-five again in the day-school. However, we never know from one day to the next 
just how many we can have. Then, in addition to these, we sent eighteen boys from 
here to the Bulsar Boarding-school. 

We close this report with an unspeakable sense of praise and gratitude to our 
Heavenly Father, who has done great things for us. When the "storms of adver- 
sity" were whistling all around us, the way upward was always open to us, and we were 
richly blessed. We thank you, too, who stop to read this report, for the prayers you 
have sent upwards. The Lord has heard. "Blessed be his name!" Don't stop praying! 

Vada 

REPORT OF JOSEPHINE POWELL 

The first week of the new year was spent in preparation for a tour among 
the villages, and the next three weeks were spent in a village about six miles from 
Vada. The second week in January my Bible woman, one evangelist and myself, 
took our tents and things for housekeeping and went out to the village of Kambara. 
The day we started we reached our camping place about two o'clock. We pitched 
our two tents under some beautiful mango trees, about a half mile from the village 
of Kambara. This done I boiled some drinking water and ate the lunch I had 
taken along. The Bible woman and catechist, and a boy we had brought to watch 
the tents, ate their food and we were then ready for work. 

Just above where we were tenting was a village, so in the evening we began play- 
ing the phonograph to call the people. In a few minutes we had a crowd. After 
entertaining them for awhile with the phonograph, the catechist arose and said: "Now 
I will tell you a beautiful story." He then preached to them for some time. They 
listened well. This was perhaps the first time that many had heard the Gospel of 
good tidings. We again played the phonograph for them, and after giving them an 
invitation to return when they had time we dismissed them. 

The next day we went out and worked in the surrounding villages. Thus for three 
weeks we worked in the villages round about Kambara, going out to the people 
in the daytime and teaching the people who came to our tents at night, or going 
out to the villages at night, where the people called us to come and bring the grapho- 
phone. We also had with us the magic lantern with Bible pictures. This also proved 
very helpful in our work. I operated the machine while my catechist and Bible 
woman told the story. The people would make engagements with us ahead, and, if 
for any reason we could not go they were very much disappointed. They would 
come in their oxcarts to take us to their village and then bring us back to our 
tents. Sometimes we did not return until one o'clock in the night, but we were so 
glad to have the opportunity of teaching them that we did not mind losing sleep. 

In a three weeks' tour of this kind many interesting things happen, and one 
-neets so many nice people it is a real pleasure, besides the fact that we are bringing 
them nearer to Christ, who died for them. As it was in Christ's time, so it is now. 
The common people hear him gladly. During these three weeks we worked a great 
deal of the time among the Warlie caste. These people are not real low caste, but 
"hey are not considered among the high caste. They are a nice kind of people to work 
among, so kind and friendly. 

We did work in fourteen villages while on this tour. Just after coming in from 
this tour I got sick, so my work stopped for a week or so. At the same time some 
of the boys in the boarding got sore eyes. They came to me for help (as I had 
been seeing after them), but being sick I had to send them to the government dis- 
pensary and the eyes got worse instead of better; so when I was able to take them 
I went to Dahanu with them and Dr. Nickey did all she could for them. 

When I returned home I began getting ready to go to the hills. I spent three 

(Continued on Page 66) 






Annual Report 43 

Vyara 

REPORT BY I. S. LONG 

The year was a busy one. There was little sickness in our community, fortunately. 
The hard times due to famine conditions were nicely tided over because of the generous 
aid sent us from the home base. A part of the money given out we hope to get back. 
Crops generally this year are good, thus far. 

Because of much to do and few hands, we have not been able to push forward 
very vigorously, and yet the work of this station is quietly growing. The people 
of the district are very receptive and a great advance might be made if we had a large 
army of true Christian soldiers to lead into the battle. Foes are many, such as dirt, 
debt, liquor and ignorance, not to mention people of influence who in every way try 
to hinder our propaganda. 

Two of our better-grade village evangelists left us for further training in the 
Bible School. This made it all the more difficult to extend our evangelistic effort. 
The head teacher of our boarding-school, and also superintendent of our boys as they 
work in garden and field, later left us for the Bible School. We sadly lack men to 
replace them. We are carrying on with men of lesser ability, doing the best we 
can. 

In the villages wherever we have earnest evangelists and teachers the work goes 
on nicely, people are baptized and the Christians grow in grace. In case of unin- 
fluential teachers, we have to say that a good work in their hands often grows slack, 
and the Christians even grow cold. So our joys and sqrrows intermingle. During the 
year 132 were baptized. 

We had two simple love feasts in the villages, under large arbors, the expense 
of which the villagers bore. We had also one love feast at the main station, when 
about 145 communed. In all the services of the church and the duties and opportuni- 
ties of a Christian we feel our people are making progress. 

Boarding-school 

Ninety-eight were registered in this boys' school, and an average of eighty-five 
was maintained. This does not include several who are day laborers and sit in night 
school. Results in the yearly examination were not quite as good as for several pre- 
vious years, although 72 per cent passed. Most of the boys are Christians, and a 
good spirit prevails among them. They often go out on Sunday evening to testify 
and sing the old, old story. All the boys work about three hours daily on the farm 
or in the carpenter shop. 

Sunday-school 

We are pushing this work with all our energy. The work here at headquarters 
is comparatively easy, but often difficult in the .villages. It is not difficult to get 
a crowd of people together, but difficult to induce them to attend regularly, so that 
they are able to pass an examination in Scripture. Yet we had 278 to pass the all-India 
examination of 353 who sat for it. The boys and girls of our boarding-schools 
won as prizes twenty-two New Testaments, four Bibles, and one silver medal. Thir- 
teen of our teachers passed third year of the teachers' training course. 

Normal School 

Seventeen men airtl women of mediocre grade attended this Normal, nine of 
whom passed second-year work. This includes two hours' Bible and three hours' 
methods and language, etc., daily for five months. It is fine preparation for village 
school workers. 



44 



Annual Report 



The Sunday-school Quarterly 

During the year about 1,820 copies of the Quarterly were issued each time. Of 
these, 557 went to the Brethren, 302 to the Irish Presbyterians, 705 to the Methodists, 
fifty-five to the Wesleyans, 172 to the Christian and Missionary Alliance, and twenty- 
nine scattered. These same notes are used also in Marathi. Hints to Teachers were 
prepared by Sister Eliza Miller. The cost for printing, paper, etc., was $311, and 
receipts were $249. We have enjoyed this work, but feel it might have been better 
done if we had had more time to give to it. 

Scholarship Students 

About half a hundred of our young men and women are taking work beyond 
the fifth standard, preparatory to service in the mission. Two are taking medicine, 
three are studying for nurses, two are taking agriculture, about one dozen are in 
high school studying English, while the majority are taking advanced vernacular work, 
preparatory to a life of teaching. With rare exceptions these young people passed 
their work, and of many of them we are proud. After passing up through these schools 
and the Bible School, later they became our teachers and preachers throughout the 
mission. These are our hope, and for them we pray. You can do no better than 
pray for these young people, that they may get such training as will fit them for 
God's work in this great harvest field. 



REPORT BY EFFIE V. LONG 

When the year has gone and we stop to review what we have done, it seems so 

little, and we wonder why it does not 



appear more. We are at it all the time 
and yet do not seem to accomplish 
much. 

The Girls' Boarding-school grew 
some — increased in numbers 25 per cent 
■ — but the average attendance for the 
year was much better than the preceding 
years. The number of girls registered 
was fifty-four and the average for the 
year, fifty. The girls used to run away 
to their homes, and on their Hindu holi- 
days when we would let them go on 
leave they would stay on and have to be 
brought back. But now many of them 
are willing to stay here, even on the 
holidays that mean so much to their 
people. Of course we recompense them 
in some way, perhaps by giving them a 
treat of something nice to eat. 

In the recent examinations 87 per 
cent of the girls passed to higher stand- 
ards. We now have a fifth standard 
class, for the first time, consisting of six 

Bhil Women, Raj Pipla State girls 

All of the girls who were old enough took the Sunday-school examination and 
passed. All the girls who are old enough are Christians. Seventeen were baptized 
during the year. They never, or seldom, consult their parents as to being baptized. 
Whether Christian or non-Christian, the parents do not object. Many of the girls 
are quite small yet, only in infants' class, or beginners. 



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Annual Report 



45 



I have not been able to do much in the district, having made only several trips 
out, but some of our helpers have been busy. Twenty-two women and eight girls from 
the villages were baptized this year. 

Then, looking after the welfare of about 200 Christians on our compound here — 
especially in times of sickness — having a weekly sewing circle for the women, teach- 
ing two of our own children at home, and looking after things in general when the 
saheb is away (which is about one-fourth of the time), has given me enough to take 
up my time and wish I had more. We often have to ask for wisdom to see the most 
important things and do them first, leaving the others undone, if need be. 

INDIA MISSION STATISTICAL REPORT FOR 1919 
Report of A. T. Hoffert, Statistical Secretary 

I. Stations; Their Equipment and Force of Workers 






1. Name of station 



2. Date of opening, 

3. Staff — American, men, 

4. Staff — American, women, 

5. Staff— Indian, men, 

6. Staff— Indian, women, 

7. Bungalows, 

8. Churchhouses, 

9. Schoolhouses 

10. Land area (acres), 

11. Land under cultivation 

12. Present value of land (dollars*), 

13. Present value of equip., build., etc., .. 

14. Evangelists — men, 

15. Evangelists— Bible women, 

16. Colporteurs, 

17. Villages occupied 

18. Villages to be evangelized, 

19. Population to be evangelized, 

20. No. fam's in homes owned by mission 

21. Chris, families in homes of their own, 



1904 
1 
1 
14 
11 
1 
1 
11 



$8,000 



1899 
2 
3 
26 
17 
2 



10 

30 

15 

$1,525 

11,800 

4 

3 

23 
162 



3 
5 

29 
7 
3 
1 
3 

25 
5 

$10,820 

46,700 

2 

2 

1 

11 
385 



6 
13 

$ 1,515 

17,400 

1 

1 



425 



|44,525|96,360|227,173|231,118 
| 17| 25| 651 161 

I i6| 88| y i 



1902 


1899 


2 




6 


2 


12 


20 


3 


4 


2 


• 1 



5 

1 

$ 900 

10,900 

2 

1 



320 

252,648 

8 

51 



1906 

1 

2 

' 14 

8 

2 

2 

7 

175 

150 

$ 2,920 

18,650 

3 

5 



12 
682 

161,588 
20 
50| 



1905 

2 

10 

4 

1 

1 

51 

25 

5 

$1,200 

9,000 

3 

2 



1905 



6 

159 

44,372 

14 

11 



9| 

28 

16 

$ 1,040 

13,600 

5 



13 
417 

127,193 
16 

120 1 



11 
22 
147 
66 

13 

5 

58| 

302 

192/ 2 

19,920 

136,050 

21 

30 

2 

100 

2,865 

,185,027 

181 

285 1 



•In this report the dollar is given the usual value of 3 rupees; however, according to rate of ex- 
change for past year, $100 brought about 220 rupees. 



II. India Church Statistics for 1919 





1 First 


Dist- 




Second Dist 
Marathi 


— 


















id 

Z 

1 
< 


u 

> 

w 

c 
< 


il 
rt 
id 

pq 


u 

O 


> 

s 



> 


73 



f-H 



< 


3 

a 
Q 


'V 

> 


*c3 

H 


£ 

3 

C/l 

ON 
ON 


"c3 

H 
00 

ON 


n 





H 

ON 


3. Org. churches of each mission station, 

4. Members Jan 1, 1919, 


38 

10 2 

4 


1 

580 

145 

25 

6 

15 

5 

2 

2 


215 

11 
16 
32 

"2 

2 

12 

2 

1 

140 

2 

2 

6 

210 

125 

$40 


1 

50 

; 
12 

"l 
1 

"i 
1 

2 

"i 

"i 

43 

25 
$70 


2 
160 

32 

'l2 

2 
1 

"i 
"3 

4 

2 

110 

5 

1 

3 

177 

150 

$40 


1 

648 

142 
4 

10 

30 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
5 
3 
J45 

16 
1 

10 
754 

?on 


6 

1691 

340 

52 

76 

47 

9 

8 

6 

4 

26 

17 

8 

605 

31 

5 

38 
1959 
1000 


1 

75 
29 

'"i 
6 


1 
25 
12 

6 


28 
36 
2 
3 
2 
2 


3 

128 

77 > 

5 
8 
2 


9 


9 


9 

1444 

228 

88 




417| 299 




7. Dismissed by letter, 


81 

55 

11 

8 

9 

6 

32 

21 

10 

699 

40 

8 

40 

2157 

1157 

$417.50 




8. Died | 






9. Disowned, 








10. Reinstated, 


3 










11. Elders, 


1 

1 
2 
2 

"l 

"i 

96 

105 

$69.50 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
43 
7 
2 

' " 43 

17 

$69.34 


1 

"3 

1 

1 

51 

1 

1 

1 

59 

35 

$ .66 


3 

2 

6 

4 

2 

49 

9 

3 

2 

198 

157 

$139.50 


9 

7 
32 


10 
6 








3 


5 

4 

2 

210 

6 

1 

18 

726 

500 

$111 


14. Council meetings, | 




15. Love feasts 








16. No. who communed at last love feast, 


"l 


744 
38 


' ' 30 


18. Held Christian W. meetings, 


19. Held daily public prayers, 








20. Members Dec. 31. 1919, 


49 


1830 
1195 


1628 

800 

$351.75 




22. Contrib. (not in S. S. T'ble), dol | 




$17 


$278 



46 



Annual Report 



III. India Sunday School Statistics for 1919 



1. Language area, 



(Gujarati) First Dist. 



(Marathi) 
Second Dist. 



2. Name of station S. S. 



No. of Org. S. Sch's, 
No. of Sunday- sch'ls, 
No. open all year, . . 
No. of teachers, .... 

Kept a record, 

Took weekly offering, 
Am't of tot. offer., 
Gave to missions,.. 

Enrollment, 

A.ve attendance, — 
Pupils bap., 1919, .... 
Chris, in villages, .. 
Chris, attend. S. S., 
Prepara. for exam., 
Teachers' meetings, 
No. in T. T. Class, .. 
Those passing T. T, 
Entered S. S. exam., 
Passed S. S. exam., 
Rec. hon. (1st class), 
Rec. hon. (2nd class), 
Front Line S. Sch's, 
Banner S. Schools, .. 
Star S. Schools, .... 



16 
20 
8 
29 
20 
18 
$110.75 



$210 



68.70! 131.35 
516 229 
332| 
78 



428 

228 

12 

10 



5 

5 

3 

11 

4 

5 

$104.50 

90.75 

256 

222| 197| 194| 

11 

46 

46 

4 

2 

6 

5 

152 

109 

40 

32 



5 
8 

4 
14 
5 

5 
$44.55 
40.90 



15 

15 

10 

26 

15 

15 

$85.50 

81.70 

700 

446| 

70 

626 

382 

15 

9 

13 

10 

330 

253 



1 

3 

1 

3 

3 

1 

$5.90 

5.90 

52 

31 

2 

24 

24 

1 



,44 

53 

28 

95 

49 

46 

$562.00 

419.30 

2041 



1 
7 
7 
12 

7 

7 

$39.00 

108.35 



1412|216 



337 195 



1 

8 

1 

14 

1 

• 1 

$20.00 

20.66 

151 



3 

24 
9 

40 

17 

15 

$92.00 

159.01 

683 



47 

87 

37 

135 

66 

61 

$654.00 

578.30 

2724 



192 
1445 

993 
37 
27 
26 
21 

827 

621 
80 
56 
3 



116| 
12 

14 

30 



54 



53 
73 
40 
126 
57 
55 
$774.34 $497.56 



387.90 
2083 



120| 452| 1864| 1400 1 



35 



269 

1513 

1168 

40 

29 

26 

21 

893 

642 

80 

58 

3 

1 

3 



223 



33 



25 



719 



247.45 

2217 

1608 

187 

1283 

850 

45 

25 

62 

45 

650 

485 

2 

7 

2 

5 

6 



IV. Educational Statistics for 1919 
A. Village Schools 



A. Village Schools. 



(Gujarati) First Dist. 



(Marathi) 
2nd Dist. 



1. Names of stations, 



D > 



Pi> 



o\ 



2. No. village day schools, 

3. No. village night schools, 

4. No. village school teachers, 

5. Enrollment, 

6. Average attendance, 

7. Number of boys, 

8. Number of girls, 

9. Christian pupils, 

10. Non-Christian pupils 

11. Hours spent in religious teaching, 

12. Primary pupils, 

13. First standard, 

14. Second standard, 

15. Third standard, 

16. Fourth standard, 

17. Fifth standard, 

18. Sixth standard, 

19. Passed in examination, 



7 ... 52 9 31 . . . 99 



55 

17 

71 

1393 

899 

1197 

196 

83 



1310 146 



78 

21 

95 

1845 

1180 

1608 

237 

104 

1741 

25* 

1195 

321 

177 

108 

43 

11 



99 



66 
9 

82 
1527 



62 

14 

79 

1738 



1341 

186 

97 

1430 



1522 

216 

81 

1657 



1013 

229 

149 

86 

35 

12 

3 



1032 
255 
142 
72 
20 
4 



Average minutes spent in religious teaching. 



Annual Report 



47 



B. Boarding School Statistics for 1919 



(Gujarati) First Dist. 



(Marathi) 
Second Dist. 



1. Name of schools 





CO 




►, 


>> 

o 


o 

- 


pq 


„ 




cfl 






■JZ 


C8 


d 


>> 


> 


> 



. 



Number teachers, 

No. day pupils — boys, 
No. day pupils— girls, 

Total No. day pupils, I 8j 

Boarding pupils— boys, I 1 

Boarding pupils — girls, | 96| 

96| 
104 
91 
49 
20 
23 
19 
21 
3 
9 
9 

n 

30 
$ 40 



8| 5 

341 14 
20 1 
S4| 15 
12150 



Total boarding pupil 

Total enrollment, 

Entered examination, 

Passed examination, 

Primary, 

First standard, 

Second standard, 

Third standard, 

Fourth standard, 

Fifth standard, 

Sixth standard 

Hours of religious teaching, 

Pupils baptized during year, 

Ave. annual total cost per pupil, dol 

Learning gardening, 

Learning carpentry, 

Learning tailoring, etc., 

Learning cooking, sewing, etc., 

Receipts from gardening, etc., dol., ..|$200| 

Fees paid by pupils, 1$ 

Government grants, dol., |$ 69 



721 50 



104 



126 
85 

44 
50 
14 
19 
17 
14 

s 

7 

36 

52 
9 
9 
2 
200 



6 
3 

Yi 

7 
36 

50 
22!. 



6 

4 

2 

6 

97 

3 

100 

106 

72 

55 

37 

21 

13 

10 

17 

2 

6 

3 
27 
49 

9 

10 

9 

265 



7 - 

1 



18 ... 14 



18 



22 



50 33 
104 
44 

1481... 
3901297 
228|161 

618i458| 
766 

494 
331 
332 
121 






50|25|...|....| 32|...| 176|174| 



3| . 

..I32|. 



87 

73 

31 

34 

33** 

125 

34* 

342 

82 

19 

242 

835 

...|. ..!... 1300 
14|... |220l 3% 



72 



36 
115 

48 
163 
186 
136 
324 



458 


487 






184 


161 


72 


92 


67 


93 


68 


52 


31 


29 


28 


14 


8 


12 




40 




19.35t 




"43.35 


... 


324.35 



On basis of present exchange the average cost is $46. 
* 35 and 33 minute averages, t Food and clothing only. 



C. Scholarship and Training Department, 1919 



rGuia,) I* Dist. gjftjg 






> 

V 

3 

e 

< 


u 
a 

IS 
3 
- 


u 
o 
ft 

- 

— 


- 


u 

>> 
> 


3 




(4 

— 
< 


3 

a 

■d 

— 

- 


-r 
td 
> 


r 


rt 
O 

h 

E 

= 


O 


id 






H 


2. Bulsar Bible School; teachers, 




3 
4 
6 

7 








3 
12 

14 

17 

5 

6 

3 

1 

5 

3 

2 

42 

24 

66 










3 

12 
14 
18 

5 
6 
4 

1 

10 
5 
2 

50 
27 
77 


14 

in 
5 
7 
1 

11 
2 

35 

15 
50 




3. Students of Bible School — men 


2 
2 
3 
2 
6 
2 


"i 


3 

3 

4 

2 


3 
3 
2 

1 
























5. Seventh standard vernacular 




1 




1 


■? 




15 












6 




1 
1 
3 

3 

2 
19 

8 
27 












1 


l 


s 


9. College students, 






? 






...... 






5 
2 


2 


7 
2 


s 


11. Medical training, 






















7 
10 

17 


i| 9 


f, 




6 

2 
8 


2 
1 
3 


8 
3 
11 


^ 




...1 31 3 


6 


15. Total No. training students. 


1 


12 


9 


38 



48 



Annual Report 



D. Summary of Educational 



(Gujarati) 1st Dist. 



(Marathi) 
2nd Dist. 



1. Total No. mission schools, .. 

2. Teaching force — men, 

3. Teaching force — women, 

4. Total teaching force, 

5. Under instruction — males, ... 

6. Under instruction— females, . 

7. Total No. under instructio n, 
* 21 are Village Night Schools 



411 91| 

384 330|637| 



25 

114 

1646 



112* 
118 

30 

146 

2150 



25|117| 4| 433| 36| 39| 30|105| 
238|463) 27|2079|220|250|1391609 



115 

1763 

538| 362| 358 

2688|2035|2263 



106 
102 
27 
129 
1905 



India Evangelistic Report for 1919 
A. Evangelistic Week, 1920 



ljarati) Dist. 




J2 
S 


u 

■ rt 

>> 

> 


-a 

3 


o 
H 



(Marathi) 
2nd Dist. 



4 
60 
56 
60 

3385 

2510 

10 



No. of work groups, 

No. of workers 

Towns visited, 

Meetings held, 

No. who heard the message 

Gospels sold, 

New Testaments sold, 

8. Bibles sold, 

9. Tracts sold, 

10. Tracts distributed free, ... 

11. Schools asked for, 

12. No. of inquirers, 

13. No. of baptisms, 

14. District Meeting Offering, .|$166.65|108.45| 



7 

43 

194 

191 

6417 

681 

6 

1 

78 

1000 

3 



3 

16 

70 

35 

3356 

571 

3 

1 

533 

1424 

2 

4 



4 
24 
24 
32 
1012 
132 
1 

' 177 

200 



178 

85 

77 

4996 

1454 

17 

6 

338 

800 

12 

35 

16 



3 
4 

19 

22 

530 

200 



300 
4 



25 

325 

448 

417 

19696 

5552 

37 

8 

1342 

3924 

22 

43 

16 



1963 
41 



196 



2371 
41 



32 

364 

554 

417 

21067 

5593 

37 

8 

1342 

4120 

22 

43 

16 



44 

545 
546 
780 



46 

478 
444 
591 



33950 20838 
3838 



51 

7 

1528 

3542 

34 

58 

19 



51 

13 

149 

2770 

29 
119 

15 



72|85.65|130.45|11.65|588.70*|88.30|71.90|25.35|201.25t|790.35| 666| 547 



Used elsewhere, t Hat collections at D. M. included. 



B. General Evangelistic Report, 1919 



1 2nd (Marathi) I 
I Dist. -| 



1st (Gujarati) Dist. 



1. Groups tenting on tour, 

2. No. weeks tenting or touring, 

3. Missionaries tenting or touring, 

4. Indians tenting or touring, 

5. Villages where meetings were repeated, 

6. Bibles sold during 1919, 

7. New Testaments sold during 1919, 

8. Gospels sold during 1919, 

9. Tracts sold during 1919, 

10. Distributed free, 

11. Temperance offering, dol., 

12. S. S. Quarterlies used, 

13. Prakash Patra (Gujarati monthly, . — 

14. Prakash Patra, Temp. Issue, 

15. Dnyanodaya (Marathi weekly), 



1 

9 

1 

2 

24 

30 

15 

1975 

262 

925 

$7.35 

80 

50 



5 

14 

2500 

45 



3 

19 

253 

506 

4000 



20 
1590 

465 

I 200 



3.00| 7.85|5.65j 1.35 



1269* 
405* 



3 

22 
2 

7 

28 

38 

74 

6834 

1783 

5192 

25.20 

1804 

575 

400 



36 
6 

18 

68 

42 

74 

6909 

2283 

5862 

25.85 

1897t 

600$ 

3000 

22 



* Used elsewhere, t 71 are in Marathi. t Printed. 



Annual Report 



49 



VI. Medical Statistics, 1919 



o 

"Si " 

> H 2 



1. No. of hospitals 

2. No. of dispensaries, 

3. No. of doctors — American, 

4. No. of trained assistants— men 

5. No. of nurses — American, 

6. No. of nurses — Indian, 

7. New cases, 

8. Repeated calls, 

9. Total calls at dispensaries, 

10. Daily average for year, 

11. Outside cases and professional visits in homes, 

12. In-patients, 

13. Obstetrical cases, 

14. Inoculations— plague, 

15. Inoculations — smallpox 

16. Inoculations— typhoid, etc., 

17. Minor operations, 

18. Major operations, 

19. Receipts, 

20. Expenses, 



1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

4405 

10677 

15082 

62 



33 



1375 

1636 

3011 

13 

120 

41 

9 



3650 

1850 

5500 

22 



1000 
3 



95 
20 
424 



$3115.20* 
$4568.55 



19 
10 
65 
15 
661.35 
1120.65 



250 



100.00 
466.35t 



33.35 
83.35 



1 

4 

3 

1 

2 

1 

9430 

14163 

24593 

100 

120 

221 

46 



364 
30 
491 
15 
3909.90 
6238.90 



2 

1 

8137 

15723 

23860 

98 

125 

194 

50 



5676.35 
7242.00 



1 

1 

7333 

7845 

15178 

62 

670 

76 

21 

321 



220 

40 

2326.65 



* At current exchange rates this figure is $4248. t $233 was supplied by gifts. 






VII. Homes 

A. Home for Missionary Children, Naini Tal: 1. Boys, 4. 2. Girls, 5. 3. Total, 9. 

B. Widows' Home, Bulsar: 1. Women, 16. 2. Children, 18. 3. Total, 34. 4. At end of year, number 
women, 8. 5. At end of year, number children, 7. 

C. Babies' Home, Vali: 1. Boys, 16. 2. Girls, 17. 3. Total, 33. 4. Deaths— boys, 12. 5. Deaths— girls. 
1L 6. Left, 3. 7. In Home at present— boys, 13. 8. In Home at present — girls, 5. 



CHINA 

FOREWORD 

'The God of heaven, he will prosper us; therefore let us arise and build." Neh. 2: 20b. 

In the following pages the China Mission presents to the Visitor family a very- 
brief account of our building for Jesus Christ, our Lord. The year has brought us 
many reasons for thankfulness and many problems for prayer. 

We thank him for answered prayers. 

We thank him for those who have returned to the field and for the new mission- 
aries. 

We thank him for Shouyang, and for those who in former years sowed the seed 
there. 

We thank him for new converts and believers. 

We thank him for the awakening in education, for the new phonetic system of 
reading, which is giving the illiterate a first-hand knowledge of the Bible, and that 
foot-binding has almost passed away in our province. 

We thank him for your sympathies and prayers and loyal cooperation in our work. 

We thank him that he has prospered us. 

We thank him for the problems for prayer, and, dear reader, will you not note 
these as you read the following reports? 

Ping Ting 

REPORT BY EMMA HORNING 

Woman's Work, 1919 

"The God of heaven, he will prosper us; therefore we, his servants, will arise and 

build." Holding this promise we, his servants, are building up the women's work here 

at Ping Ting Chou. We are still opening the work and can not look for great results, 



50 



Annual Report 



Each year we push out 



but we are laying the foundation and we claim the promise, 
further in each line of work. 

The women's school is doing better work with a deeper Christian spirit. Some 
twenty women attend the classes. The new buildings have been completed and we 
moved into them the last of the year. The school is in session three months in the 
spring and three months in the fall. During the intervening months they come to the 
classes once a week. The larger part are able to read in the Bible now. The kinder- 
garten, in connection with the school, has grown to twenty without any special effort- 
on our part, for we have no one appointed to take charge of this work. As they had 
the time, Mrs. Vaniman, Miss Clapper and Miss' Shock had charge of the children at 
various times. We are still praying for a teacher to take charge of these kindergarten 
children. 

May 6 to 9 Miss Gregg held three days of evangelistic work at the church. Some 
eighty women attended each day. Fifteen enrolled as inquirers. In the fall four were 
baptized. Three of these who were baptized are nearly sixty years old. 

During the evangelistic week the missionary women and the Chinese Christian 
women made a special effort in the city and near villages to reach the homes with 
the gospel message. Dividing into three and four groups we reached 150 homes in 
the city and nine villages. Those who had the time continued the next two months, 
till the school opened. Some thirty villages were reached. The attitude of the people 
has changed very remarkably. In the smaller places all the homes were entered. In 
the larger places the people came together in various places in the village. They 
would listen to us speak as long as we had strength to talk to them. 

Some fifty evening meetings were held in the city and these thirty villages. The 
main teaching was on the life of Christ and the reforms of our Governor Yien. The 
meetings are held in the open air, where men, women and children can get the 
teaching. 

In the spring the city official asked four of our Christian women to help in the 
anti-foot-binding campaign. By twos they were taken to each home in the city, where 
they taught the evils of foot-binding and gave the orders of the governor. The result 
is marvelous. Most of the young girls' feet are now unbound, and some of the 
women's. But best of all none of the little giHs' feet are being bound in this city and 
many other places of the province. 

This campaign opened all the homes of the city to our Christian women. Now our 
women make home-to-home visits when they go out to teach on Sunday afternoons. 
They divide into three or four groups, and the schoolgirls often go along with them to 
sing. They are well received and are listened to very attentively. 

In the fall the 
missionary women 
organized and de- 
cided that the moth- 
ers as well as the 
evangelistic workers 
would visit regular- 
ly in the Christian 
and inquirer s' 
homes, and also in- 
vite them to their 
homes in social 
groups. The plan is 
working well. The 
Thursday devotional 
meetings average 

about eighty worn- 

This Heathen Temple Is Built in Attractive Manner and in a Public __ „„« „„u rt ^u.vi^ 

Place. The Christian Church Dare Do No Less en and Schoolgirls. 







Annual Report 



51 



Those who cannot attend the regular classes are given instruction in the homes. 

The city and some twenty villages were reached with the Christmas message this 
year. On Christmas afternoon some three hundred children attended the program 
given for them at the church. 

Dec. 21 one of our oldest Christian women passed to her reward. 

Miss Shock is preparing to take, the women's work of this place while the writer is 
home on furlough this next year. 



REPORT BY F. H. CRUMPACKER 
Ping Ting Men's Evangelistic Work, 1919 

At the very beginning of the year the writer and Pastor Yin joined the Baptist 
and Congregational workers in an effort to get the Gospel to some of the villages 
where the plague prevention had been carried out the year before. While we were 
away at that time the home forces carried out a week of special evangelism in the 
villages near Ping Ting Hsien. Mr. Vaniman was the organizer of these bands, and 
for seven days the bands made daily trips to the near-by villages. A lot of preaching 
was done and tracts were distributed and some gospel portions were sold. This effort 
was a splendid help to those who engaged in it, as well as for the people who heard 
the Gospel. 

The Church Work in the Church 

The regular appointments have been filled at the church each Sunday. Both Chi- 
nese and foreigners have had a part in this. Several new people were heard in the 
pulpit and the hearers were al- 
ways helped. 

The Sunday-school work 
has not missed a session in the 
year, and here the practical 
work of teaching the Bible is 
entered into in a real way. This 
is largely carried on by the 
Chinese leaders. 

During the year four regular 
business meetings were held, 
and in this work a decided 
growth is seen. The Chinese 
church has assumed financial 
responsibility in two directions. 
In the first they decided to sup- 
port a lay evangelist at a new 
out-station that we have opened. 

In the second place they are praying for the heat and light at the church. In managing 
the affairs of the church they are also taking a responsible part. An advisory council 
was chosen by the church. This is a committee of five Chinese brethren and one 
foreigner, who, with the elder, have the managing of affairs in the church. This 
council corresponds to the official council in the home church. 




Our Shansi Train. The People Are Not Passengers or Friends, 
but Venders Who Bring Their Wares to the Train to Sell 



At the Out- Stations 

The work at the out-stations seems to be in a healthy condition, for from five of the 
six out-stations we had applicants for baptism at our baptismal service last year. At 
some of the out-stations the local membership is quite active, and this is very helpful 
to the work in these places. 

Colportage Work 

From two to five men have been in the field all the year and have covered a large 



52 Annual Report 

territory. They have distributed several thousands of tracts and have sold a few thou- 
sand portions of the Gospel. Many personal conversations have been held and a lot of 
preaching on the streets, in the homes, and by the roadsides, has been done. They 
have also used the reflectoscope with a good bit of interest. Hundreds of people have 
been attracted in this way and have heard a bit of the Gospel by thus having been 
brought to the meetings. 

At the Street Chapel or Book Depot Reading Room. 

Several games and some new periodicals have added to the attractions of this place. 
A goodly number of people come to read and pass away the time. In one way or 
another they are getting a little bit of the Gospel every time they come. We hope 
that the results from this will tell in the future. 

This work cannot be measured by immediate results, and neither can any depart- 
ment of mission work. The expense is heavy, and if one should attempt to say that 
missions paid good dividends in the numbers of people who come into the church, I 
fear it would be difficult to prove that it is not a losing investment. However, the 
work done is influencing the nation, and we can be assured that the seed sown will 
bring results. Not only are lives being changed, but whole communities are being 
changed and in the outcome the nation will be changed. 

At the end of the year we have as a showing in numbers who came into the church, 
thirty-four, including men and women. Two more had planned definitely to be bap- 
tized, but were stricken with the " flu " just at the time of the baptismal services. A 
good feeling prevails in the church, and the community never was more willing to listen 
to our workers than at the present. As of old, our greatest need is a band of con- 
secrated Chinese leaders. May God's name have the praise for the successes of the 
year. 

REPORT BY ANNA CRUMPACKER 
Women's Country Evangelistic Work 

The year 1919 brought many new pleasures to me, as I had my first opportunity to 
meet with the women of all our out-stations. These women are stronger physically 
and more open-minded in many ways, than our city women; neither does social law 
confine them so closely to their homes. 

At our newly-organized out-station, Chiao Pei, the people had seen but one foreign 
woman before my trip there last October. This woman was French, and had only 
passed through the town. The work here is very promising. They have a girls' school. 
The hearty invitation to visit the school was accepted. The teacher, a man, has a nice 
home, quite a library of English and Chinese books, and a small organ. The home was 
beautifully clean, but how I wish I had counted the' idols! There certainly were more 
than twenty, many of them being brass. The teacher's wife and four other women 
started to learn to read. 

Two days' travel by donkey is needed to reach the two most distant out-stations. 
When the weather is nice and we have good animals and good drivers, these trips are full 
of interest and pleasure. A deeper joy comes, however, when one can work with the 
women, teaching them to read and telling them the blessed story. This year the first 
out-station woman was received by baptism. Two others are ready and will doubtless 
be received in the spring of 1920. Another mark of advancement is the urgent invita- 
tion to hold a class in our nearest out-station. This request will be complied with 
soon after the Chinese New Year. 

In a home at Kao Lao a dear old grandmother was told of the love and power of 
the true God. Two days later an escort was sent with an invitation to come again to 
the home. The woman said, "See, I have taken down the paper idols; tell me how to 
worship the true God." Oh, that the abundant life may be given to these thousands 
of women! 



Annual Report 53 

REPORT BY ERNEST D. VANIMAN 
Ping Ting Boys' School Report, 1919 

The standard of any school is largely determined by the teachers of the school. 
The teaching force of our schools has been improved during the past year. There 
were three teachers with some college training; one other a high-school graduate; an 
industrial teacher with some special training, and one teacher of Chinese of the old 
school, besides myself in the Ping Ting Boys' School and Orphanage,, which prepares 
for the high school. Of the out-station school-teachers all but three hold Government 
Normal Teachers' Certificates. 

At the central school there has been a total enrollment of ninety-eight, with 
twenty-one of these in the higher primary or three upper grades. The highest enroll- 
ment at any one of the out-station schools was fifty-six. This school had two teachers, 
one for Chinese and one for the modern subjects. 

The first three weeks of the year completed the first semester of the school year. 
This was followed by twenty-three days of vacation at the Chinese New Year time. 
One week of this time was the week of evangelism, in which some thirty of the stu- 
dents took active part. They were divided into six groups, each taking a different 
route each day. Some 300 Gospels were sold and some 5,000 people listened to the 
preaching and singing. 

The second semester closed June 21 with eight graduates from the higher primary. 
This was the largest graduating class thus far. The commencement exercises were 
held in the church in conjunction with the Girls' School. Mr. Wang, principal of the 
city Government High School, gave the address. He praised our plan of having the 
two schools unite in our commencement. This is a good sign of the willingness of the 
Chinese to break away from their old customs. 

Four of our graduates entered the Oberlin Memorial Academy at T'ai Ku, thus 
increasing the number of our students in the academy to ten. All are doing quite well. 
The other four boys went to T'ai Yuan Fu and entered the army. Here they receive 
good physical training, have six hours of class work daily, are paid an allowance and 
given their food and clothes. The writer visited them in the fall and encouraged them 
to make the most of their opportunities to make known the Christ, to their fellows. 
They are free on Sundays and attend church. 

Three of the An Hui boys returned to their homes in June. Two of them did not 
return, because of inability to make progress in their studies. 

The fall term opened Sept. 1 here at Ping Ting. The out-station schools do not 
close during the summer, but have a month's vacation at the time of the autumn harvest, 
so that the students can help in the fields and at threshing. 

Oct. 10 the national holiday was celebrated by a program in the church. Both the 
Boys' and Girls' Schools took part. Some of the teachers spoke and the pupils sang. 

Hand-work was introduced into the lower primary grades. The pupils enjoy it 
very much. We will teach gardening next spring. 

Two days were given for Christmas vacation. On Dec. 23 six more schoolboys 
were baptized. Three were from out-stations. 

The schools are where hearts and minds are prepared and receive the seeds of 
truth. May they yield a bountiful harvest! 

REPORT BY MINERVA METZGER 
The Ping Ting Hsien Girls' School, for 1919 
The days come and go in the Ping Ting Hsien Girls' School, and soon a year has 
passed and we are asked to tell you what we have done. There is not much to report 
outside of the regular routine of daily duties, but this is always accompanied with 
plenty of variations. We are up at six, get the sweeping and dusting done, breakfast 
at seven-thirty, prayers at eight-fifteen, lessons from nine to twelve, dinner, lessons 
again till four. What do we do after four? Twice a week we sew till five, once a week 

BRIDGEWATER COLLEGE LIBRARY 



54 Annual Report 

we attend the Thursday service for women and girls, twice a week we play basket ball 
and once a week the teachers have their special meeting. At six we get supper, and at 
seven we prepare lessons for the next day; at eight we bow our heads to thank the 
Lord for the blessings of the day and ask him to forgive our wrongs and keep us 
through the night. At nine we put out the lights and are soon fast asleep. 

This year our teachers helped us to organize a literary society. We are expected 
to write and read compositions, give talks, tell stories, sing, give the current news, 
debate and report the Sunday sermon, and we never know who will be called to give 
this last number. 

Twenty-six of us signed the temperance pledge. We promised not to use intoxi- 
cating drinks, tobacco and opium. May the Heavenly Father help us to live faithful 
to our promise. This year nine of the pupils were baptized. They had special lessons 
twice a week for several months. Sometimes it is hard to live like a true disciple, and 
so the Christian girls, seventeen in all, meet every Saturday evening in a " Bear ye one 
another's burdens " meeting. 

In June, Wang Shu Chih completed the grades. She was the first girl to be 
graduated from our school. She started to the academy, but did not stay; later she was 
hired to teach in the Shou Yang Girls' School. 

In September we began using the Rossville Hall. We wish to thank the kind 
friends who sent the money to erect this new dormitory. 

This year we also opened our first village school at Kao Lao. They closed the 
year with twenty-one pupils enrolled. We are planning to open more of these schools 
soon. The fields are white unto the harvest, but the laborers are few. The time we so 
earnestly prayed for has come, but we are not ready. The Shansi governor is estab- 
lishing schools in the cities and villages. He needs teachers, but where are our trained 
Christian boys and girls to take these strategic positions? May the Lord forgive us 
for delaying his work in China for so many years. 

REPORT BY BESSIE M. RIDER 
Ping Ting Medical, for 1919 

The medical work at Ping Ting, while naturally being somewhat less, owing to Dr. 
Wampler's absence on furlough, has nevertheless kept up remarkably well. For the 
first nine months of the year we had the services of Dr. Yuan, a native physician who 
had been loaned to Ping Ting Station for the time to care for the work during Dr. 
Wampler's absence. With his services the surgical side of the work was kept up fairly 
well, a great proportion of the cases being tubercular in nature. 

This year has the distinction of having had the largest number of normal obstetri- 
cal cases in the history of the hospital — a very encouraging indication, from the fact 
that heretofore, with very few exceptions, they came to the hospital only as a last 
resort when no other means of saving life seemed available. 

During the past year our foreign mission family at Ping Ting was gladdened by 
the arrival of the following little ones: Verna Ruth Flory, Lowell. Vernon Heisey, 
Catherine Ruth and Emma Marie Oberholtzer. 

The patients have been responding quite well in the matter of donations. The 
gifts, fees and money collected for medicines during the year amounted to $891.19, the 
total expenditures amounting to $1,589.45. 

A great asset to the evangelistic work of the hospital during the past year has been 
the introduction of the national phonetic system. By this means many who have here- 
tofore been unable to read may acquire a reading knowledge of the Bible in but a few 
weeks' time. Some of our in-patients, who had never learned one character before 
entering the hospital, were soon happy in being able to read Mark's Gospel; and as 
these return to their homes they are presented a Gospel. Song leaflets and gospel 
pictures are also given, the recipients having first been given an explanation of the 
meaning of the same. The pictures and song leaflets are then hung upon the wall as 



Annual Report 55 

they return home, and by this means we trust that the good news may continue to 
spread and help lead others to the light. 

The statistical report for the year is as follows: In-patients, 177; operations with 
general anaesthetic, 35; operations without general anaesthetic, 86; dispensary calls, 
5,228; visits to homes, 136. 



Liao Chou 

REPORT BY R. C. FLORY 

Liao Chou Evangelistic Work for 1919 

The work of 1919 in many respects has been very encouraging. Some of our native 
Christians are coming to have real Christian experiences, and they are learning that 
the kingdom of God must grow within their hearts; that it is not the material, visible 
building in which they worship, and also that merely being a member of an organiza- 
tion called the church is not sufficient to redeem them from a world of sin. While 
some few are coming to realize these fundamental truths, the majority are very weak 
spiritually and can see little deeper than the material benefits which they may realize. 

During the month of May inquirers were instructed, and during our special annual 
meeting for our Chinese Christians, from May 22 to 25, thirty-two souls came into the 
church by baptism. During these several days we had a splendid program. Some of 
the subjects discussed were, ''The Present, the Christians' Great Opportunity"; "Our 
Responsibility as Christians to Those Outside the Church"; "Bible Study and Prayer 
in the Christian's Life"; "The Christian's Duty to His Own Home"; "Why Does the 
Church Not Prosper?" "The Standard for Christians to Seek to Attain." These and 
other problems were discussed with much interest. 

During the year a number of visits were made to the three out-stations. The work 
at Ho Hsun and Yu She is developing very favorably. The work at the village of 
Ch'ang Ch'eng is not progressing so rapidly. Baptisms from these stations for the 
year are as follows: Ho Hsun, six; Yu She, two; Ch'ang Ch'eng, one. Of the remain- 
ing twenty-three who were baptized during the year, eighteen were from the Liao Chou 
Boys' School, one girl from the Girls' School, three in the city, and one from the vil- 
lage of Tuan Yu, forty-five li north. 

For some time we have been looking for a Christian Chinese qualified to assist in 
the evangelistic work. About Nov. 1 we secured a Mr. Li, of Peking, who has had a 
good education and several years' experience in pastoral work. With his assistance we 
hope to see the work develop with greater strides during the year 192(1 

About Oct. 24 we started on a trip west and visited several stations of neighbor- 
ing missions, where mission work has been carried on for many years. By our visit 
and study of their work we secured a number of helpful suggestions which will be of 
practical value to us in our work. 

Several villages some distance from us are calling for us to bring the good news to 
them. We pray and hope that during the year 1920 we may be able to plant in a num- 
ber of these places the seed which will grow and develop into Christian churches. 

We seek a special interest in your prayers for the year 1920, that the work may 
greatly prosper and that the Father's name may be greatly magnified among these 
needy people. 

REPORT BY N. A. SEESE 
The Boys' Schools of Liao Chou Station for 1919 

The work as a whole this year has been very encouraging, even if not all were 
gained that might have been expected. Two things which make the work encouraging 
are: first, the increased enrollment; and second, the improvement in the standard of 
scholarship of the faculties of the schools. The first of these conditions is due very 
largely to the increased interest in education in China in the Shansi Province. The 



56 Annual Report 

second condition is not due to anything except that we were able to get a better corps 
of teachers. The number of our teachers had to be increased because of the larger 
attendance. We now have five regular teachers and one who gives part time at the 
main school in Liao Chou. At two of the out-station schools we have two teachers, 
respectively, and at one out-station school we have only one teacher. 

Before this year no system of records had been adopted for the schools of this 
station, so that not much can be given in the way of statistics. This year we have 
adopted a history record blank that will enable us from now on to keep a very close 
record of all our students. 

In giving the statistics below I have preferred to err on the side of^ conservatism 
rather than to make them too large. The total, enrollment for the different schools of 
the station was about as follows: 

Liao Chou Boys' School, y 125 

Yu She Hsien School, 60 

Ho Hsun School, 35 

Ch'ang Ch'eng School, 20 

Totals, 240 

At the Liao Chou, Yu She Hsien, and Ho Hsun schools considerable equipment 
has been added in the way of desks, benches, tables, clothes, boxes, etc. At 
Yu She Hsien the local church paid for the making of twenty-five desks and benches, 
each to accommodate two pupils. These desks are made after a modern pattern arid 
of different sizes, so as to accommodate different-sized pupils. At Ho Hsun the local 
church also paid for the making of the desks and benches. These desks are made like 
those mentioned above. Making desks and benches of different sizes to accommodate 
both large and small students seemed like a novel idea to some of the Chinese at first, 
but after one was made and tried they thought it rather a good idea. At the school at 
Liao Chou we have been able to fix up a room for washing and bathing, so that the 
furnace room does not need to serve in that capacity any longer. Last spring about 
seventeen from the school in Liao Chou joined the church. During the summer several 
of the older students spent their vacation under the direction of Bro. Flory, selling 
books and tracts and preaching at the markets. 

At the close' of the school last June eight students from the higher primary and eight 
from the lower primary were graduated. Of those who graduated from the higher 
primary six are in high school and two are teaching in our out-station schools. Those 
in high school are promising men for future work in the church. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE HIEL HAMILTON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, 

LIAO CHOU, SHANSI, 1919 

Staff 

O. G. Brubaker, M. D., in charge of the hospitals and medical department. 

C. H. Yiian, M. D., associate physician and surgeon. 

Mrs. Myrtle I. Pollock, R. N., superintendent of nursing department. 

Mr. Yao, Ching Jung, nurse in men's hospital. 

Miss Chang, Hsiu Lin, nurse in women's hospital. 

Mr. Yii, Hui Feng, evangelist, Men's Hospital; Mr. Chang, Hua T'ang, evangelist 

for follow-up work, Men's Hospital; Mrs. Chang, Ts'ung Li, Bible woman, Women's 

Hospital. 

Hospital Managing Committee 
O. G. Brubaker, chairman; C. H. Yiian, vice-chairman; Myrtle I. Pollock, English 
secretary; T. S. Yang, Chinese secretary; N. A. Seese, Chao, Ch'un Poa. 



Annual Report 57 

REPORT BY O. G. BRUBAKER, M. D. 
General Statement 

The work in both the out-patient and in-patient departments has progressed very 
satisfactorily during the year. During 1918, on account of overseeing the erection of 
the administration building of our hospital and the physician's residence, the time of 
the physician in charge was more taken up in that line than in looking after the medical 
work proper. Again, in 1919, he was asked to look after the erection of the Sweitzer 
Memorial Girls' School. And now as the new year comes along he finds himself think- 
ing more of getting ready for his furlough than the hospital. We most sincerely hope 
that when we return in 1921 we can give our undivided attention to the medical work. 

With the coming to us of Dr. Yuan, during the year, with Mrs. Pollock beginning 
regular work the last quarter, and with our two Chinese nurses and the two men 
evangelists and the Bible woman, we can really boast of a staff that is worthy the 
name. 

We are sorry that Mr. Tuan, our former Chinese nurse, became so ill with tuber- 
culosis in the spring that he had to sever his relations with the hospital, but we are 
glad that our good friends at Paotingfu could send us Mr. Yao, who has proved his 
worth and ability during the past nine months. 

As will be seen from the statistical statement the work in the Men's Hospital has 
been all that we could expect it to be, considering the fact that Dr. Brubaker was at 
Pingtingchou nearly three months during the year. His stay at Pingtingchou was 
made necessary on account of Dr. Wampler being home on furlough. Five foreign 
babies were born at Pingtingchou while Dr. Brubaker was there. At different times 
during the year the Men's Hospital was filled up and we needed wards and beds. The 
work in the Women's Hospital is much better and larger than in any previous year, 
but still it remains small. The women of this interior place are very fearful, and have 
been kept behind closed doors for so long that the mere mention of going to a foreign 
hospital makes most of them shudder with fear. We have been rigid in our rule not 
to admit any relatives or friends into the hospital wards to wait upon the patients, in- 
sisting that we are trying to run a hospital, not an inn. This has, no doubt, kept some 
away, but the people are gradually learning to understand us and to know that we are 
here for their good, and if the work grows in the next six years as it has in the last 
six we shall soon have all we can take care of, and some more. 

The station family for the most part have been well throughout the year. Little 
Winifred Brubaker finally recovered from her severe attack of typhoid fever, which she 
contracted in December, 1918. Miss Senger suffered a nervous breakdown in the 
spring, and has spent most of the time since at Chi Kung Shan and Pingtingchou. At 
present she is reported to be improving and hopes to take up her regular work soon. 
Mrs. E. M. Wampler, who, with her husband and little daughter, came to Liao in June, 
has been sick with tuberculosis most of the time since she came to Liao. During De- 
cember she went into the hospital and is doing very nicely at this time. Gladys Miriam 
Flory came to the Flory home on May 28 and has been doing her part in making life 
worth while. 

The hospital committee has proven a real help to our work, and it occurs to the 
writer that the choosing of such a committee is a step in the right direction, for it will 
be a means of educating the Chinese and getting them ready for the work that must 
sooner or later fall to them to do. 

Beginning with Jan. 1 the hospital has decided that patients will be received into 
the hospital by classes; the first class will pay fifteen cents per day, second class ten 
cents per day, and third class 100 cash per day. These fees are for food; the hospitals 
furnish beds and bedding, room and light. A charge of fifty cents per week will be 
made for private rooms. We hope more fully to equip the private rooms soon and will 
make a larger fee for them. 

Mr. Yii has kindly consented to act as a sort of general manager for both hospitals, 
and will do the local buying for the hospitals as well as take over the managing of the 



58 Annual Report 

kitchen. In this way the kitchen will be under the direct management of the hospital 
committee, and thus we can better control the kind and quality of the food. 

The evangelistic department of the hospitals took on new impetus during the last 
quarter, due to the fact that we were able not only to have a resident worker in each 
hospital, but also had a man out visiting the homes of the patients. Homes and vil- 
lages were reached in which the Word had never been taught before. From now on 
we hope to keep a record of the religious belief of all patients coming to the hospitals, 
Daily religious services are held in the wards, and the patients receive much personal 
attention. Our Bible woman, under the direction of Mrs. Brubaker, has been teach- 
ing the women patients selected portions of Scripture and hymns. An effort has been 
made to teach the phonetic script to the women as well as to some of the illiterate men 
patients. We try to do all our work as unto God, and thus we have a wonderful 
dynamic, a mighty reason for our being here. 

Representatives of the official class, gentry, teachers, merchants, students, farmers, 
student priests, mechanics and coolies not a few have occupied beds in the hospital. 
Four provinces and seven counties have been represented, so our work is far from be- 
ing local. 

Just as the old year was closing a very severe epidemic of influenza broke out in 
the city and boys' school and in a couple of days we had all our beds taken and a num- 
ber of boys had wooden beds in the men's chapel. Taking these cases into the Men's 
Hospital was a dangerous procedure, but as we do not yet have an isolation ward there 
was nothing else to be done. Four of our surgical cases contracted " flu " and two of 
them nearly died with " flu-pneumonia." It goes without saying that one of our first 
needs is an isolation ward. 

We are supporting a student in the Teh Chou, Shangtung, Training School for 
Nurses, who will finish his work in January, 1920. And also a student in the Medical 
College at Tsinanfu, who will finish in 1921. Both of these young men expect to come 
to us for service as soon as they have completed their work 

We have found our laboratory most helpful. With the instruments of precision in 
diagnosis we have been able to satisfy ourselves in diagnosing such diseases as anaemia, 
malaria, tuberculosis, syphilis, intestinal parasites and many others. 

Statistical Report 
Patients Discharged During 1919 

Transferred from 1918, 7 

Admitted during year, 174 

Transferred to 1920, 22 

Total discharged during 1919, 159 

The following deals with the 174 patients admitted to the hospital during the year: 

In-patients 

Male Female Total 

Medical, 38 12 50 

Surgical, 63 10 73 

Opium patients, 47.... 4 51 

Totals, 148 26 174 

Operations 

Major 50 

Minor 113 

Out-patients 

Male Female Total 

New cases, 968 171 1,139 

Returns, 3,478 ". . . 1,084 4,562 



Annual Report 59 

Calls on Chinese, 196 

Calls on foreigners 95 

Patients seen on trips, strays, etc., 216 

Totals, 6,208 

Among the cases were cataract, single and double; diabetes, secondary anaemia, 
pulmonary tuberculosis, corneal ulcer, colelithiasis, gastric ulcer, external and internal 
hemorrhoids, entropion, tubercular hip disease, empyemia, post auricular abscess, furun- 
culosis, tuberculosis of bones and joints, malaria, rectal fistula and fissure, varicose 
ulcer, fracture, gunshot wounds, impitigo contageoso, typhoid fever, ascaris lumbri- 
coides, pneumonia, influenza, tinea of the scalp and body, harelip, abdominal abscess, 
etc. 

REPORT BY WINNIE CRIPE 
The Sweitzer Memorial Girls' School, 1919 

This has been a rather eventful year in the history of the school, so much so that 
as we come to its close we would scarcely recognize it as the same school because of 
the change in location and personnel of teachers and pupils. 

When the year opened there were eighteen pupils, and we were nearing the close 
of the first semester of the school year. Jan. 30 we closed for the Chinese New Year 
vacation, and opened Feb. 20. The spring term brought in eleven new pupils, which 
increased the enrollment to twenty-nine, though one became ill and was in the hospital 
nearly all the time. 

In March Mrs. Dr. Yuan, who was head Chinese teacher, left us to join her hus- 
band at Ping Ting Chou. This necessitated the securing of another teacher to take her 
place. After what at first it seemed would be a fruitless attempt, Miss Wang Yii Mei, 
of T'ung Chou, was secured to help us, though she, being eighteen years old, and just 
a graduate of Government Normal, was quite unable to assume the responsible duties 
which Mrs. Yuan had laid down, so they again reverted to the superintendent. 

During the spring term one of the pupils, who had formerly been opposed by her 
parents, was baptized, and was a happy girl because her desire to follow the Master 
was gratified. 

With the spring term began the work of Mr. Kung Yu as classic teacher in the 
school. 

Since the foundation of the new school-building had been laid the preceding 
autumn, and efforts were made during the winter to secure some building materials, 
work was begun April 1 on the buildings. This brought on a busy season, for what 
with trying to help with the planning and overseeing the building operations and try- 
ing to carry on the work of the school at the same time, it was difficult to do justice to 
either, and we were glad when the time came to close school, June 10. After this we 
gave full time to looking after the buildings and the making of furniture for the school. 

We were unable to have the buildings ready for occupancy by the time school 
should have opened, but the work was pushed as much as possible and we were ready 
to open Sept. 25. The day previous, Sept. 24, was the day set for dedication of the 
school-buildings. Many invitations were sent out and announcements posted, and 
when the time arrived a splendid crowd was on the ground. Seven government schools 
were invited, and all came; many of the gentry of the city, and men, women and chil- 
dren not a few. 

Among the speakers on the program were the local official, county superintendent 
of schools, and Brethren Crumpacker and Vaniman, of Ping Ting Chou. Our plans at 
this time to raise subscriptions for a library in the school were heartily agreed to by 
the official, who headed the list with ten dollars and appointed solicitors to secure such 
funds. As we give this report nearly thirty dollars has been paid, and some subscribed 
has not been received. 



60 



Annual Report 



During the summer months many of the girls came in for daily classes of study, 
and a weekly sewing class was conducted, Miss Wang doing most of this work. In this 
way we had better success in keeping in touch with the girls than ever before. 

From the time school closed in the spring, and Miss Wang Hsiu Jung went home, 
we felt burdened with the question, " Where shall we secure another teacher for the 
fall term?" A great deal of correspondence was carried on with the various missions, 
but without success, and we were about to despair of a second teacher, when just a few 
days before school was to open Miss Ma Hsiu Chih, of Paotingfu, decided to come. 
Thus we were again assured of three Chinese teachers to assist in the school, and with 
twenty-eight girls again enrolled we began work with new zeal. 

In November a girls' school was opened at Ch'ang Ch'eng, and there are fifteen 
girls enrolled. We made a trip to this place to help them get the school started, 
and then we went to Yii She Hsien, where plans were made for the opening of a 
school. 

The Christmas season was a happy one for the school this year, largely made so 
because the girls put more into it themselves. They rendered a program on Christmas 
Eve to a large audience and participated in the giving of gifts to others. 

As we recall the events of the year we note that it has been a very busy one, 
but it has also been full of blessing. As we now look at the Sweitzer Memorial Girls' 
School Building, dormitories and playground, so generously provided by kind friends 
at home (among whose names that of Sister Eliza Sweitzer deserves first place), 
it all stands as bold evidence of that love of God which we have come to disseminate 
among these people. While it causes us to say, "The Lord hath done great things 
for us whereof we are glad," we pray it may ever stand as a living witness to bring 
many to Christ. 

REPORT BY ANNA M. HUTCHISON 
The Women's Evangelistic Work at Liao for 1919 

The work is this department, during the past year, was kept up, we believe, as best 
it could be under the circumstances. 

The regularly-appointed workers, Sisters Senger and Hutchison, being off duty the 
greater part of the year, the former being sick and unable to work except during the 
first few months, and the other not returning from furlough until near the close of the 
year, the work necessarily needed to change hands frequently, and even then others 
who kindly assisted could not give much of their time to this department of the work, 
having duties of their own which required their time. Yet we are grateful for all help 

given, and that the 
work has not only been 
kept alive, but some 
souls have been 
brought nearer their 
Savior. 

Throughout the 
year the regular public 
services of Sunday- 
school and Bible class- 
es in the city have 
been maintained by the 
assistance of our dif- 
ferent missionary sis- 
ters in leading, and 
much of the time we 
have been enabled to 

Croup of the Women and Schoolgirls Who Go Out on Sunday After- keep U P ™ e P ra ctical 
noons and Teach and Sing in the Homes 




Annual Report 61 

work by our native Christian women and girls in their Sunday afternoon teaching and 
singing in the homes. And some of our Christian women, who have learned to read, 
have been assisting in teaching other women to read. Sisters Seese and Oberholtzer 
also help some in this work. 

During the early part of the year Sister Senger, with a couple of Bible women, spent 
several weeks in some of our out-stations and surrounding villages, telling the gospel 
story to the many who have never heard. It is invariably admitted by workers in 
China that the people of the villages are easier reached and more open to teaching than 
the people of the cities. Thus we regret exceedingly that Sister Senger, our village 
worker, during the past months has not been able, on account of ill health, to keep up 
this line of endeavor. During the summer, even the oversight of the city work on 
which she was substituting, had to be given into other hands. In this Sister Brubaker 
kindly rendered her services, and also started a class among the women in the study 
of the new phonetic script, which system of writing is rapidly becoming popular in 
China for the illiterate, and bids fair to lift the millions of China out of their illiteracy. 
Sister Cripe also rendered some valuable service in special Bible teaching with our 
women. 

During the month of March Sister Senger had charge of a four weeks' station class 
for the women, with a fair attendance. During this station class at various times 
special lectures were given by different ones of the missionaries. They were appreci- 
ated by the people, especially Dr. Brubaker's lantern lecture on the fly. 

Near the middle of September Sister Hutchison returned from furlough to take up 
her long-interrupted work among the women. Substituting in the girls' school, fol- 
lowed by her furlough, led to an interruption of nearly three years. And it was with 
a peculiar sense of joy and satisfaction she resumed her chosen work, with new in- 
spiration gained through the months of furlough. The remainder of the year was 
spent largely in again making a rather complete canvass of the city and in getting re- 
adjusted in general. In this canvass old acquaintances were renewed, new ones made, 
a number of new readers enlisted, and the gospel message taught from house to house. 
A general knowledge of the situation and of the people has thus been obtained that we 
believe will prove of valuable help in our work. Just preceding the Christmas season 
the poor of the city were visited, and on Christmas day, after the regular services, a 
special service was held for them, at the close of which clothing, millet and corn were 
distributed to them — the Christmas offering of the Liao church, and through which we 
trust that even a greater blessing may come to these needy souls. 

And now, as we begin the new year, we realize that we are entering upon a year 
of great opportunities, and commensurate with these is our responsibility. God help 
us, that as much as in us is we may be faithful to our high calling. And may we have 
your prayers, that we may have more patience, more love, more wisdom and power 
truly to represent our Savior in word and in deed before these people among whom we 
labor, that his name may be glorified and that we may in a measure help his kingdom 
to come. 

REPORT OF I. E. OBERHOLTZER 
A $200 Gift 

Nov. 18, last year, we were able to announce to our friends in China and America, 
the arrival of a $200 gift. It was quite a surprise to all, and the mission became very 
much excited over it. It was not only an extraordinary gift for the recipients, but an 
unusual and numerical addition to the mission family. It was the birth of twin girls — 
Catherine Ruth and Emma Marie— into the home of Mrs. Oberholtzer and the writer. 

Womanhood is not held in high esteem in China. Baby girls are usually welcome 
only after three or four brothers have been born. With one son to continue the family 
name, the birth of one girl could be endured, but to have two of them thrust upon par- 
ents at the same time is cause enough for indignation. The Chinese take it for granted 
that the foreigner is in some unexplainable way different from them, and that such a 



62 Annual Report 

calamity may be differently looked upon by the missionary of the West. The Chinese 
are proverbally polite. And of course it is always polite to congratulate another for 
that which he himself would resent. 

The Chinese have a phrase, " Grown rich by one hundred dollars," which, when 
used in a domestic relation, means that a daughter has been born into the home; 
Therefore it frequently happens that the congratulation comes to us — " You have grown 
rich by two hundred dollars." To the people of this land the phrase is reminding the 
individual that these two girls, when grown to the age of sixteen or eighteen, can be 
sold for that sum of money. 

Money and girls of a marriageable age are almost equally in demand in China. 
The masses are wretchedly poor. Therefore it is not strange that girls* usually are 
thought of in terms of value. It is said that nowhere in China are girls so dear as in 
the province of Shansi — the province in which the Brethren Mission is located. One 
hundred dollars is a large sum of money to pay for an insignificant member of society. 
It is a large sum for a poor family to receive at one time, and decidedly large for the 
man who has to pay it. One would conclude that parents are eager to raise all the 
girls that are born, but not so. Girls are raised at a financial loss in China. Their 
selling price at maturity does not compensate the expense of feeding and clothing 
them. It is because of this that many poor mothers dispose of their daughters as soon 
as they are born, while an even larger number see to it that they are kept in the 
minority in the home. We recently had working for us a young married woman, who 
has already lost three or four baby girls in some unknown way. These poor, ignorant 
women know no better. They have no conscientious scruples upon the question. We 
do not mean to say that it is the prevailing practice. There is an increasing sentiment 
against it. The financially able and the better classes do not resort to it. But the prac- 
tice is common among the poor, of whom there are many. 

The inference is that the birth of a female child is seldom received with generous 
hospitality, and the advent of twin girls furnishes even less occasion for rejoicing. 
There are few Chinese who wish to " grow wealthy by $200." If we raise these two 
little girls of ours we will be doing it at a financial loss, as have all our parents when 
they cared for their children. But we have no thought of doing otherwise. We have 
decided neither to kill them nor let them starve; neither to give them away nor sell 
them now for a small sum; nor are we calculating on the two hundred dollars when 
they are grown. These children are a divine trust from high heaven, to be loved, fos- 
tered and directed. My readers would all welcome a $200 gift of this description, I 
dare say. But in China it is taken as a curse and displeasure from the gods. To us it 
is a double blessing. The missionary is in China to advertise the Christian home, and 
God can use us in a peculiar way when he gives us these children. There are only a 
few score who come under the influence of our teaching and preaching, but there are 
fifty thousand people in this county who may read our conduct and who silently but 
surely are being influenced by our example. 



Shou Yang 

REPORT OF THE BOYS' SCHOOL BY B. M. FLORY 
The Beginning 

October 25 will long be remembered as the date when the enrollment in the Shou 
Yang Boys' School " went over the top." Up to that time the work of organization and 
preparation for the school had been 90 per cent speculation, spiced with 10 per cent of 
hope, perseverance and prayer. 

Early in September several conferences were held with some of the leading Chi- 
nese, at which the prospects and possibilities of opening the school were fully dis- 
cussed. Most all agreed that the undertaking would be largely an experiment. Some 
spoke hopefully and encouraged making an attempt; others, in the light of the con- 






Annual Report 



63 



servatism of the city and community, believed the attempt would be fruitless. At this 
time posters were placed at our front gate and several public squares in the city, stating 
that on Oct. 24 the Christian Mission would open a school for boys and that those 
desiring to patronize it should come and enroll at once, as our housing quarters would 
accommodate only a limited number. The course of study and the fee for board and 
room also were made known. 

Early in October Mr. Ho Wei, a Chinese teacher, was hired to take charge of the 
school. He is a Christian and a college graduate from one of our neighboring missions. 
Therefore, coming from a distance, he knew nothing of our situation except that we 
were beginners. Upon arrival he found no boys, no equipment, in fact, nothing. Thus 
his first question was to inquire for what purpose he had been called. Upon being told 




Shou Yang Schoolgirls, Verna Ruth Flory in the Chair 



that our school was in the formative stage and we hoped would soon materialize, he 
proved to be of the optimistic type and set to work to turn our hopes into actuality. 

By Oct. 23 twenty-four boys had applied for admission, but by the evening of the 
25th thirty-two had been enrolled and ten refused because of limited quarters. This 
unexpected enrollment necessitated the securing of another teacher. In this attempt 
we were again most successful, as a local Chinese gentleman of college rank, and with 
years of experience in the government schools, was secured. The two constitute a 
very capable teaching staff, are interested in the outcome of the school and working 
conscientiously. As a result of their efforts and efficiency the school has already be- 
come noted in the community from a qualitative viewpoint. 

Our boys are 'from eight to fifteen years of age. In the first-half examinations, just 
closed, all except two made a good showing. Twelve or fifteen more have applied for 
admission for the last half, but it is impossible for us to receive them on the present 
grounds. 

The Bible is included in their catalogue of studies. In addition we give them a 
little chapel service each morning. They are very much interested in our God and 
Savior Jesus Christ, and can already sing several songs from memory. All are inter- 
esting and intelligent, and from this number we shall endeavor to raise some strong 
Christian leaders. The hope of Christian education, of the Christian church, and of 
China lies in her young manhood: 



64 Annual Report 

REPORT BY NORA FLORY 
A Message from Shou Yang 

Like most mothers, I have been busy caring for our little one and looking after the 
duties of the home, spending my spare moments in language study. 

After moving to Shou Yang, the latter part of June, we still found a great need 
for language study, as 'these people have a kind of language of their own, especially 
the women, who never get away from their homes. ' One of the first steps was get- 
ting acquainted and making friends with the people. I went with Sister Schaeffer 
into some of the homes, and as a rule we always received a hearty welcome. Here 
we talked with the people to the extent of our language, telling them fpr what pur- 
pose we had come and always leaving them an invitation to visit us. Most every day 
a crowd of women and children came to see how we foreigners lived. We also made 
several visits to a village a few miles away, each time getting into some six or seven 
homes. At most every turn we made we were asked if we could cure their diseases. 
How our hearts did long to be able to relieve them, for this is certainly one way of 
becoming acquainted and winning their confidences. 

As the days rolled by, the time came for the opening of the schools, and now it is 
certainly not lonesome around the compound, for in our crowded quarters the front 
yard serves as a playground for the boys' school. A bunch of interesting little fellows 
these boys are, with their bright, smiling faces and polite bows every time you meet 
them. Indeed, the Chinese people are very polite. One of the first things a child 
is taught in the home is politeness. Just now they have all gone to their homes for 
the Chinese New Year's vacation. They did not leave without first coming in and 
making a bow to each of us. 

What hopes and possibilities lie wrapped up in these lives, Christian teaching and 
time only will tell. 

REPORT BY MARY SCHAEFFER 
Moving to Shou Yang 

The second year of our stay in China has come and gone and we. are being 
initiated into some of the real problems of missionary life. The first half of the year 
was spent at Ping Ting Hsien, chiefly in language study. A little time was also used 
in visiting in the homes. 

June 27 was moving day, and six left the Ping Ting station for Shou Yang. The 
work is not an entirely new work, so as soon as we arrived we had some callers, and 
to our dismay could understand but little of what they said, as the dialect varies a 
little. By careful listening the language became more intelligible as the weeks went 
by and we came in contact with the^ people more. Day by day we became better 
acquainted, getting into homes, some of which had and some of which had never been 
entered by missionaries, asking and answering questions, telling them the gospel 
story as well as our hampered speech would allow. The work among the women 
is very much needed. The morals are rather low, especially among the city women. 
Many of the villages are open to teaching. We are welcomed to their homes and 
they enjoy the little songs we sing as well as looking at the picture chart while it is 
explained to them. Some are very much interested in the new simplified method of 
reading (the phonetic script). As we find the people interested we are encouraged, 
though they are interested partly because it is new and partly because they are afraid 
of foreigners and their teaching. Were they all zealous for the Gospel there would 
be no need of our being here. The work goes slow, as we try to teach these women, 
who know nothing, to read, as well as the gospel truths, but the Spirit is at work and 
he will bring the harvest. We need the prayers of the whole Brotherhood as we push 
out into the work, trying to destroy the influence of the evil one on the Chinese. 



Annual Report 65 

REPORT BY V. GRACE CLAPPER 
Shou Yang for 1919 

In addition to language study, which occupies most of the time of the new mis- 
sionary during the first two years, the early spring months of 1919 were spent in the 
kindergarten and in home visitation at Ping Ting. Having been appointed to work 
at the new station, Shou Yang, it is needless to say that we were eager to get settled 
in our new home and to open up the work to which we had been assigned; so on June 
27, with all our possessions roped upon the backs of mules and donkeys, ourselves 
mounted upon donkeys' backs or riding in sedan chairs, our party of six bade fare- 
well to our fellow-workers and Chinese friends at Ping Ting, and were off for Shou 
Yang. We had looked forward with great anticipation to our third year when we 
would be permitted to 'begin our work, and be a little more than an expense to the 
mission. It is such a joy finally to have reached the stage where one can say some- 
thing besides, "What is your naive?" "How old are you?" and "How many are in 
your family?" These three ques.'ons you are expected to ask, and must be able to 
answer wherever you go in China, whether you are fond of mentioning " the days of 
the years of your pilgrimage " or not. The summer days of 1919 were spent in fur- 
ther language study, and in getting acquainted with the people of Shou Yang, and 
Oct. 24 the first Girls' School (mission school) was opened at this place, which since 
that time has been my special charge. Fifteen girls are now enrolled, ranging in age from 
eight to fourteen years, and these we hope and pray may in the future shine as 
"lights" in fifteen heathen homes, revealing to the inmates, "the Lamb of God which 
taketh away the sin of the world." 

REPORT BY WALTER J. HEISEY 
Men's Evangelistic Work, Shou Yang Hsien 

With the addition of the county of Shou Yang to "our mission territory in China, 
we have the added responsibility of giving the Gospel to about 196,000 souls, the greater 
part of whom have never had the privilege of hearing the Gospel story. In this 
district there are fifteen large market centers in which there should be located a 
native evangelist. The smaller villages and outlying territory could then be worked 
from these centers. However, with our present force of workers we can work only 
the central station, Shou Yang, and Ching Chuan, the market town that lies nearest 
the central station. 

When the work was opened, late in June of 1919, we had as helpers, in addition to 
the foreign force, Mr. Chin, who was a faithful Christian man and who helped us in 
our language study; Mr. Pai, who assisted in the evangelistic work at Ching Chuan, and 
Mr. Jung, who is our evangelist at the central station. Mrs. Chang came a little later 
to help in the work among the women. When the boys' and girls' schools were 
opened we had added to our staff Miss Wang to help in the girls' school and Mr. Ho 
in the boys' school. Both of these have noble Christian character. The boys' school 
was also successful in securing the aid of a very influential local teacher, who has the 
manifestations of noble Christian character, although he has not yet been baptized. 
He is listed among the enquirers and we hope to receive him by baptism shortly. He 
has been of valuable assistance, both in the boys' school and to the work of the station 
in general. His name is Mr. Kuo, I hope you will become familiar with some of these 
names, and when you pray remember them before the throne of grace. 

With the assistance of Mr. Jung and a few of the other workers, together with more 
or less frequent visits from some of the workers at Ping Ting, we have had preaching 
every Sunday and three evenings each week. The attendance at the Sunday services 
has ranged from seventy-five to 150 with a probable average of 100. These represent 
nearly all classes of people, with a majority of farmers. The evening services are 
attended by our own helpers on the compound and a few people from the outside. 

We have also endeavored to do some preaching at the fairs and theatricals that 



66 



Annual Report 



are conducted in the city and surrounding villages. At such times we usually select 
a suitable location and preach until the theatrical begins, at which time we withdraw 
unless the interest in the preaching is such that it seems expedient to continue. 
Along with the preaching we distribute tracts and gospel portions. As a rule the 
people assemble an hour or so before the theatrical opens, and they are very glad to 
listen to singing and preaching. Many of them also read the Scripture portions and 
tracts with considerable relish. No one can tell what fruit truth learned thus in an 
idle moment may bring forth. 



ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT, 1919 
Stations 





For'n 


Chin. 
Evan. 


Chin. 
Edu. 


Chin. 
Medic. 


CO 

3 
U 

o 

"o 
U 


c 

o 

rt 

in 

3 
O 


CO 

"o 



-3 
O 


09 

'C 

w 
C 

u 

a 

co 

s 

Q 

co 

O 

X 


3 


I 


c 

3 


3 
u 

E 
o 




3 
B 

o 


3. 
u 


s 

B 
© 


s 

<L> 


s 

a 

o 


*3 

fc_CU 

<u 

1! 

w 




6 

4 
2 
2 


12 
9 
4 
3 


13 

5 
2 


2 
2 
1 


14 
12 
3 


3 

2 
1 


2 
1 


"i 


5 


6 

3 
1 


8 

5 
2 


1 
1 


600,000 




400,000 




196,000 





































Totals, 



14| 28| 20| 5|~28| 6\ 3| 1| 5| 10| 15[ 2[ 1,196,000 





Church for 


1919 
























CO 

3 


CO 














Ih 

<U 

CD 










co 


.3 


3 














>> 




o* 






,3 


U 


.3 




CO 


«°) 




<L> 




.3 








u 

3 
.3 
U 

bib 
u 


CO 


u 

CO 

3 


co 


CO 
CTJ 


.3-< 
0) 


CO 

S 


.3 


U 

3 


"3 
to 


S 

ershi 
31, 1 


x 




CO 

°3 


O 

o 
a 


y 

3 

3 


1) 

> 
o 


la 






O 
co 


a 

to 


eath 

emb 
Dec. 






o 


3 


p 


O 


J 


^ 


n 


rt 


Q 


5 


Q S 




1 


i 




4 


1 


187 


32 


I 






219 




1 


i 




1 


1 


76 
4 


32 








108 










4 


















..... 









Totals, 




2 


2 


1 


2 


267 


64 


I 


1 .1 
















REPORT OF JOSEPHINE POWELL 

(Continued from Page 42) 

months at Landour, up among the Himalayas. It is a beautiful place to go for a rest, 
having a lovely climate, conducive to making one strong and ready for work again on 
the plains. When I came down the rains were on and I could not get to Vada, so 
I had to go to Dahanu, where I stayed until I had a telegram from Bro. Garner, 
saying the rivers were passable. 

When I arrived home I found that some new girls had come into the girls' 
boarding-school. I had not been home lon'g until another girl came, then another 
and still others, until ten new ones had been received. Later on two more came in, 
making in all twelve new girls. We began the new year 1919 with eight girls and closed 
with twenty-two in the girls' boarding-school. A number of these girls were in a very 
bad condition. Some were half-starved, others sick, etc., so it took much of my time to 
get them fed and doctored up and make their clothing, keep their mending done, 
teach them, etc. 

In the Junior Missionary Department of the July Visitor I will tell you the 
story of one of the schoolgirls, the first one who came in during the new year. 






Annual Report 



67 



Sunday School, 1919 







to 


m 

o 


co 
V 






c 






O 
O 


09 


m 


D 










A 


bo 


o 


c 




CJ 


• 


*o 
o 

o 

m 


C/3 

a 
u 

£ 

bo 




3 

CO 
u 

V 


C 
<u 

< 


CO 

s 

CO 


"en 
Ih 






u 


"rt *> 












bO 


V 


5x1 


vt 




a, 








> 


o* 1 






rt 


H 




O 


W 


N 


H 


<£ 


CQ 




1 


1 


$59.80 
32.00 


31 


180 


20 


Yes 




1 




22 


150 


15 


Yes 


Shou Yang, 





Totals | 2 1 2 | $91.80 1 53 | 330 | 35 | Yes 

The offerings are given in Mexican. 

Medical, 1919 















Op'r't'ns 


Out-pa- 


u 






u 






tients Dis- 
















*j3 


.« 




pensaries 


to 






CO 

a 
2 
'a 


H 
C 

'u 


a 


to 




Efl 

M 

c 
< 

a 

V 

O 

u 
•a 


u 

<o 

K 

e 


u 

to 




3 
U 

fa 

£ 










CO 


3 
O 

3 




fa 

C 

ba 

'53 

u 


to 

u 

in 
V 

a 


to 
u 

a 
to 

'Z 


10 

u 
3 

<u 

CO 
V 

e 


to 

s 


< 

u 

o 

u 
U 

T3 


a 

< 

3 
O 


CO 
'cO 

> 

CO 


CO 

"co 

> 

a 

u 

3 


6 
o 

a 

CO 


3 

a 

O 

.2 


.•2 
"C 

c 
o 
U 

"3 




3 


ja 





ji 


i— i 




d 


% 


.t! v 




3 


o 




fa 


u 


fa 


U 


13 


P 


fa ! fa 


U 


O 


h-J 


Ping Ting Hsien, 


1 


1 


?. 


1 


177 


35 


6 


m 


1357 3871 


136 


1 


$ 891.19 




1 




1 


2 


174 


50 


11 


102 
5 


1139 4562 
180 250 


291 
25 




358.86 


Shou Yang, 





Totals, ) 2| 1[ 3 1 3|351| 85 1 17|187[2676186831452| 1|$1,250.05 



Mexican money used. 



Day Schools, 1919 



Ch'ang Ch'eng, Boys' School 

Ho Hsun, Boys' School, 

Kao Lao, Boys' School, 

Kao Lao, Girls' School, 

Le Ping, Boys' School, 

Luan Liu, Boys' School, 

Yu Hsien, Boys' School, 

Yu She Hsien, Girls' School, 

Yu She Hs ien, Boys' School 

Totals, 




| 247 | 3 



Boarding Schools, 1919 
















CO 

'5 

3 
fa 




CO 


3 

Ih 




CO 


CO , 




<u 


CO 




























J5 




cd 






fa 


u 




41 


CO 

3 


« 




tfc 


CO 




O 




O 




T3 


o 


bo 




d 


6 


cd 


o' 






to 


to 


O 


to 


fa 


Ping Ting, Boys' School 


98 

58 
108 
38 
32 
15 


28 

17 
20 


7 
6 
5 

5 
3 
2 


6 

4 
3 

3 
2 
2 


Yes 
Yes 


Ping Ting, Girls' School, 


Liao Chou, Boys' School 


Yes 

Yes 
Yes 


Liao Chou, Girls' School, 


Shou Yang, Boys' School, 


Shou Yang, Girls' School, 


Yes 


Totals, 


259 


65 





20 





68 Annual Report 

FINANCIAL 

1. World-Wide Fund 

Receipts- 
Balance from last year, $ 36,772 21 

Donations reported in Visitor, $173,277 07 

Income from endowment, 61,302 75 

Miss. Annuities, Supports, etc., 1,820 00 

Pub. House earnings, and int. on investment, 32,479 05 

Interest on bank account, 489 *62 $269,368 49 

/ 

$306,140 70 

Expenditures — 

Annual Meeting Committees, Auditors, $ 386 10 

Annuities on endowment funds, 41,649 20 

Publications, Account No. 21, 15,446 97 

General Expense, Account No. 22, 12,382 54 

District Mission Work, Account No. 23, 5,380 00 

Sweden Mission, Account No. 4 6,269 51 

Denmark Mission, Account No. 5, 4,483 49 

China Mission, Account No. 3, 35,213 07 

India Mission, Account No. 2, 97,553 36 

Transfers, etc., 559 92 

Support G. J. Fercken, Accounts Special, etc., 2,711 46 $222,035 62 

Balance to New Year, $ 84,105 08 

2. India Fund 

Receipts — 

Balances from various India accounts last year, $ 32,045 03 

Donations reported in Visitor, $ 1,896 62 

Interest on endowment, 276 60 

Special supports of workers, Account No. 12, 18,318 41 

Transmission to missionaries, Account No. 15, 1,668 71 

Rhodes Memorial Fund, Interest, 180 00 

Oklahoma Memorial Boarding Schools 395 00 

Quinter Memorial Hospital, reported in Visitor, 622 11 

Palghar Hospital, reported in Visitor, 502 00 

Hospital, reported in Visitor, 102 07 

Widows' Home, reported in Visitor, 130 48 

Boarding Schools, reported in Visitor, 8,020 93 

Boarding School Buildings, reported in Visitor, 1,734 88 

Famine Relief, reported in Visitor, 6,717 93 

Native Workers, reported in Visitor, Account No. 14, 4,583 83 

Refunds on fares, etc., 1,291 87 

Share Plan, reported in Visitor, 4,434 39 

Anklesvar Girls' School, reported in Visitor, 930 56 

Vada Auto Fund, reported in Visitor, 30 66 

Village Church Fund, reported in Visitor, 400 00 

School Dormitories, reported in Visitor, 2,025 00 

Anklesvar Churchhouse, reported in Visitor, 2,077 19 

Student Fellowship Fund, reported in Visitor, 5,478 43 

From World-wide, to balance, 97,553 36 $159,371 03 



Expenditures — 

General Missions, $ 18,350 00 

Fares on railroads, outfits, freight, etc., 4,375 93 

Steamer fares, voyage money, furloughs, etc., 20,998 50 

Windmills, stoves, tools, freight on same, 2,053 15 

School buildings, 13,125 68 

Boarding Schools, Training Schools, Teachers' Lines, 25,605 61 

Hospitals and furnishings, 6,012 07 

Widows' Home, 650 00 

Transmission, 1,668 71 

Famine Relief, 11,091 09 



$191,416 06 



Annual Report 69 

Vada Auto Fund, 30 66 

Village Church Fund, 250 00 

Bungalows, , 7,400 00 

Native and Servants' Quarters, 3,650 00 

Language and Bible Training Schools, 2,200 00 

Wells and land, 3,500 00 

Publishing Fund and Normal Training Department, 900 00 

Building Repairs, 1,250 00 

Medical Work, 2,550 00 

Babies' Home Maintenance, 750 00 

Furloughs, 3,000 00 

Bungalow Deficits, 2,131 85 

Heavy Furniture, 1,000 00 

Student Fellowship Fund, 5,478 43 

Balance for Exchange-deficits, 1,727 99 

Supports of Workers, 24,664 03 

Native Workers, 6,643 83 

Shares in India Station Expenses, 4,434 39 

Vacations, 1,000 00 $176,491 92 

Balances to New Year — 

Rhodes Memorial Fund, $ 3,216 00 

Quinter Memorial Hospital, 6,57191 

India Boarding School, 884 04 

Village Church Fund, 150 00 

School Dormitories, 2,025 00 

Anklesvar Churchhouse, 2,077 19 $ 14,924 14 



$191,416 06 



3. China Fund 

Receipts — 

Donations reported in Visitor, $ 1,436 27 

Interest on endowment, 13100 

Ping Ting Industrial Building, reported in Visitor, 175 00 

Special supports of workers, Account No. 12, 14,010 32 

Refunds on voyage expenses, etc., 247 34 

Orphanage, reported in Visitor, 618 64 

Ping Ting Hospital Adms. Bldg., reported in Visitor, 858 44 

South China Mission, 44 12 

Hospital, reported in Visitor 684 18 

Crumpacker Home, Ping Ting, reported in Visitor 1,574 82 

Liao Chou Girls' School Building, reported in Visitor, 1,000 00 

Liao Chou Girls' School Furnishings, reported in Visitor, ... 60 00 

Ping Ting Hospital, reported in Visitor, 787 71 

Ping Ting Women's Dispensary, 61 25 

Liao Chou Hospital, reported in Visitor, 252 94 

Boys' School, reported in Visitor, 388 40 

Girls' School, reported in Visitor, 350 52 

Transmission, Account No. 17, 603 24 

Native Workers, Account No. 16, 3,347 60 

Liao Chou Memorial Church, reported in Visitor 1,170 93 

Ping Ting Girls' Dormitories, reported in Visitor, 800 00 

From World-wide, to balance, 35,213 07 $ 64,815 79 



Expenditures — 

Balance due from last year, $ 1,979 34 

Fares, money for voyages, outfits, freight, etc., 9,592 34 

Medical outfits, medical services, etc., 582 60 

China History, 1,000 copies, 424 36 

Deficits due to low rate of exchange, 6,885 71 

Liao Chinese Doctor's House 162 60 

Ping Ting Girls' School Building, 650 40 

Ping Ting Compound Buildings, 276 42 

For buying building material, 3,252 00 

Supports of workers 17,790 76 

Liao Chou Girls' School Furnishings, 60 00 

Ping Ting Hospital, 1,751 00 

Ping Ting Women's Dispensary, 61 25 



70 Annual Report 

Liao Chou Hospital, 1,432 33 

Boys' School, 3,132 00 

Girls' School, 737 50 

Liao Chou Girls' School Building, 2,415 44 

Transmission, 603 24 

Ping Ting Hospital Administration Building, 3,250 00 

Ping Ting Dormitories, 600 00 

Rent and Repairs, 795 00 

Men's Evangelistic, 1,807 50 

Language Teachers, 465 00 

Women's Work, , 287 50 

Miscellaneous and Agency Hire, 712 50 

Vacations and furloughs, 1,700 00 

Language Schools, 900 00 

Ping Ting Industrial Building, 175 00 $ 60,502 45 

$ 62,481 79 
Balances — 

South China Mission, $ 549 92 

Liao Chou Hospital, 165 71 

Ping Ting Hospital, 272 62 

Liao Chou Memorial Church, 1,170 93 

Crumpacker Home, '. 225 18 

Girls' Dormitories, Ping Ting, 400 00 $ 2,334 00 

$ 64,815 79 

4. Sweden Fund 

Receipts — 

Balance in Sweden Funds from last year, $ 114 75 

For Missions, reported in Visitor, .$ 218 22 

Swedish Relief, reported in Visitor, ' 50 00 

Churchhouse Fund, reported in Visitor, 1,834 08 

Special Supports, Account No. 12, 1,080 00 

Transfers and from World-wide, to balance, 6,358 61 $ 9,540 91 

$ 9,655 66 
Expenditures — 

Support of District Work, . . . $ 5,000 00 

Travel expense, supports, freight, etc., 2,656 83 $ 7,656 83 

Balances to New Year — 

Sweden Churchhouse, $ 1,926 58 

Swedish Relief, ' 72 25 $ 1,998 83 

$ 9,655 66 

5. Denmark Fund 

Receipts — 

Mission Work, reported in Visitor, $ 38 91 

From World-wide, to balance, 4,483 49 $ 4,522 40 

Expenditures — 

Support of Mission $ 2,127 03 

Travel expense, freight, outfit, 1,694 12 

Support of missionaries, 701 25 $ 4,522 40 

6. Church Extension 

Receipts — 

Balance from last year, $ 11,703 39 

No increase, $ 11,703 39 

Bills Receivable 

Loans paid by churches — 

Hartman, Colorado, $ 47 60 

Slifer, Iowa, 100 00 

Wiley, Colorado, 300 00 

Freeport, Illinois, 400 00 



Annual Report 71 

Oklahoma Ch., Okla. City, 100 00 

Selma, Virginia, 160 00 $ 1,107 60 

Balance of loans at close of year, $ 7,167 90 $ 8,275 50 

Expenditures — 

New Loans made — 

Battle Creek, Canada, $ 1,100 00 

Oklahoma City, Okla., 400 00 

Freeport, Illinois, 2,000 00 

Milk River Congregation, 600 00 $ 4,100 00 

Balance loans from last year $ 4,175 50 $ 8,175 50 

7. Ministerial and Missionary Relief Fund 

Receipts — 

Balance from last year $ 9,528 14 

Refunds on support, $ 59 75 

Receipt No. 12169, 20 00 

Receipt No. 12289, 7 50 

Receipt No. 12486, 22 00 

Receipt No. 12491, 10 75 

Receipt No. 12622, 10 00 

Brethren Publishing House, interest, 1,573 80 

Earnings Gish Publishing Fund, 680 00 $ 2,383 80 

$ 11,911 94 
Expenditures — 

Paid out in 'assistance to ministers or their widows, $ 3,744 00 

Balance to new year, $ 8,167 94 

8. Gish Testament Fund 

Receipts — 

Balance on hand from last year, $ 795 69 

Sales of Testaments, 439 70 $ 1,235 39 

Expenditures — 

For printing of edition of Gish Testaments, $ 1,553 86 

Deficit to new year, $ 318 47 

9. Gish Publishing Fund 

Receipts — 

Sales of books during year, $ 925 48 

Income, Gish Fund endowment, 3,400 02 $ 4,325 50 

Expenditures — 

Deficit from last year, .$ 373 94 

Books purchased for fund . . . 3,914 49 

To Ministerial and Missionary Relief, 680 00 

Expenses of Committee 5 00 $ 4,973 43 

Deficit to new year, $ 647 93 

10. Brethren Publishing House 

Receipts— r- 

Earnings, 1918-1919, and cash turned over, $27,000 00 

Insurance premium refund, 15 44 

Interest on investment, .' 7,869 00 $ 34,884 44 

Expenditures — 

Insurance Premium, $ 320 63 

Decorating and wiring Board Library Room, , 60 96 

Office rental for year, 450 00 

To Ministerial and Missionary Relief, 1,573 80 

To World-Wide Fund, 32,479 05 $ 34,884 44 



72 Annual Report 

11. Special Funds 

Home Mission Fund — 

Donations for year, reported in Visitor, to new year, $ 403 16 

Africa — 

Balance from last year, $ 132 15 

Donations reported, 15 00 $ 147 51 

Japan — 

Balance from last year. No increase, 85 30 

Philippines — v , 

Balance from last year. Nd increase, 81 40 

Porto Rico — 

Balance from last year. No increase, 234 42 

Arab Work- 
Balance from last year. No increase, . \ 50 00 

South America — 

Balance from last year, $ ' 149 34 

Donation. ' Reported in Visitor, 1 00 $ 150 34 

New England Mission — 

Balance from last year. No increase, 202 50 

Southern Native White— 

Balance from last year. No increase, 182 23 

Cuba Mission — 

Balance from last year. No increase, 331 27 

Australia — 

Balance from last year. No increase, 16 00 

Denmark Poor Fund — 

Balance from last year. No increase, 3,944 90 

Jerusalem — 

Balance from last year. No increase, 200 66 

Italian Mission — 

Balance from last year, $ 1,838 06 

Donations. Reported in Visitor, 8 05 $ 1,846 11 

Colored Mission — 

Balance from fast year. No increase, 151 10 

Colored Mission, Industrial — 

Balance from last year. No increase, 397 75 

Stover Lectures — 

Balance from last year, $ 302 66 

Donations reported, 60 00 $ 362 66 

12. Special Support Funds 

Southern California Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12143, , $ 150 00 

Receipt No. 12655, : 210 00 $ 360 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Gertrude Emmert, India, 360 00 

Middle Pennsylvania Sunday Schools 

Receipts--— 

Receipt No. 12072, $ 180 00 

Receipt No. 12579, 540 00 $ 720 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Brother Jesse B. Emmert in India, $ 360 00 

Balance to new year, 360 00 $ 720 00 

Eastern Pennsylvania Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12232, $ 180 00 

Receipt No. 12651, 180 00 $ 360 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Kathryn Zigler, India, $ ' 360 00 

Western Pennsylvania Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Balance from last year, $ 255 19 

Receipt No. 12561, 950 00 $ 1,205 19 

Expenditures — 

Support Sisters Ida Shumaker, Olive Widdowson, India, $ 720 00 



Annual Report 73 

Support Sister Grace Clapper, China 350 00 

Balance to new year, 135 19 $ 1,205 19 

Nebraska Foreign Fund 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11856, $ 73 49 

Receipt No. 12194 135 16 

Receipt No. 12223 66 00 

Receipt Np. 12246, 57 56 

Receipt No. 12472, 26 50 

Receipt No. 12682, 68 19 $ 426 90 

Expenditures — 

Deficit from last year, $ 66 90 

Support Sister Josephine Powell, India, 360 00 $ 426 90 

Middle Iowa Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12205, $ 156 65 

Receipt No. 12687, 330 00 $ 486 65 

Expenditures — 

Deficit from last year, $ 126 65 

Support Brother S. Ira Arnold, India, 360 00 $ 486 65 

Pipe Creek Congregation, Maryland 

Receipts — 

Balance from last year, $ 90 00 

Receipt No. 12468, 220 00 

Income on endowment, 110 03 $ 420 03 

Expenditures — 

Support Brother W. B. Stover, India, $ 350 00 

Balance to new year, 60 03 $ 420 03 

Cedar Rapids Sunday Schools, Iowa 

Receipts — 

Balance from last year, $ 350 00 

Receipt No. 12546, 350 00 $ 700 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Emma Horning, China $ 350 00 

Balance to new year, 350 00 $ 700 00 

First Church, Philadelphia 

On hand at beginning of year. No receipts or expenditures, $ 300 00 

S. G. Nickey and W. I. Buckingham Families 

Receipts — I 

Receipt No. 11967, $ 180 00 

Receipt No. 12389, 180 00 $ 360 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Dr. Barbara Nickey, India, $ 360 00 

Mt. Morris College Missionary Society 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11713, $ 50 00 

Receipt No. 11792, 160 00 

Receipt No. 11868 50 00 

Receipt No. 12156 100 00 

Receipt No. 12392 50 00 

Receipt No. 12529, 100 00 

Receipt No. 12623, 110 00 

Receipt No. 12674, 310 00 $ 930 00 

Expenditures — 

Deficit from last year, $ 150 00 

Support Brother D. J. Lichty, India, 360 00 

Balance to new year, 420 00 $ 930 00 

Mt. Morris Sunday School 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12444 $ 225 00 

Receipt No. 12609, 135 00 $ 360 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Sadie J. Miller, India, $ 360 00 



74 Annual Report 

Northern Illinois Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11905, $ 

Receipt No. 12214, 

Receipt No. 45639, 

Receipt No. 12543, 

Receipt No. 12675, 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Kathryn Garner, India, 

Northern Indiana Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11852, $ 

Receipt No. 12369, 

Receipt No. 12660, 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Mary Stover, India, $ 

Support Sisters Metzger and Schaeffer, 

Balance to new year, 

Middle Indiana Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11752, $ 

Receipt No. 12384, 

Receipt No. 12504, 

Expenditures — 

Support Brother Adam Ebey, India, 

Balance due new year, 

Southern Indiana Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11870, $ 

Receipt No. 12329, 

Expenditures — 

Support Brother W. J. Heisey, China, 

Pine Creek Congregation, Indiana 

Receipts — 

Conference offering, 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Winnie E. Cripe, China, 

Walnut Sunday School, Indiana 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11861, $ 

Receipt No. 12333, 

Expenditures — 

Support Brother Andrew Hoffert, India, 

Bethel Congregation and Sunday School, Nebraska 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11978, $ 

Receipt No. 12443, 

Expenditures — 

Support Brother Raymond C. Flory, China, $ 

Deficit from last year, 

Balance due new year, 

Second Virginia Congregations 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12386, $ 540 00 

Expenditures — 

Deficit from, last year, $ 

Support Brother and Sister I. S. Long, India, 

Balance due new year, 

Northern Virginia Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11914, $ 

Receipt No. 12385, 

Expenditures — 

Support Brother F. J. Wampler, China, 



6 25 

275 00 

15 00 

3 00 

60 75 


$ 


360 00 


• 


$ 


360 00 


530 00 

530 00 

20 00 


$ 


1,080 00 


360 00 

700 00 

20 00 


$ 


1,080 00 


25 00 
10 00 
15 27 


$ 


50 27 




$ 
$ 


360 00 
309 73 


175 00 
175 00 


$ 


350 00 




$ 


350 00 




$ 


350 00 




$ 


350 00 


180 00 
180 00 


$ 


360 00 




$ 


360 00 


40 00 
150 00 


$ 


190 00 


350 00 
40 00 


$ 
$ 


390 00 
200 00 



152 85 
720 00 


$ 
$ 


872 85 
332 85 


175 00 
175 00 


$ 
$ 


350 00 

350 00 



Annual Report 75 

First and Southern Virginia Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Balance from last year, $ 175 00 

Receipt No. 11915 175 00 

Receipt No. 12431, 175 00 $ 525 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Rebecca Wampler, China, $ 350 00 

Balance to new year, 175 00 $ 525 00 

Bridgewater Sunday School, Virginia 

Receipts — 

Conference offering, $ 350 00 

Receipt No. 12473, ,....: 350 00 $ 700 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Norman A. Seese, $ 350 00 

Balance to new Year, '. 350 00 $ 700 00 

Antioch and Brick, Bethlehem Congregations, Virginia 

Receipts- 
Receipt No. 12178, $ 116 67 

Conference offering, 164 30 

Receipt No. 12433, 48 50 

Receipt No. 12652, 20 53 $ 350 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Brother I. E. Oberholtzeiy China, $ 350 00 

Botetourt Memorial Missionary Society 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12670, $ 1,260 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Brother A. W. Ross and Family, India, $ 1,260 00 

Southern Illinois Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

No Receipts 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Eliza B. Miller, India $ 360 00 

Deficit last year, 13100 $ 49100 

Balance due new year, $ 491 00 

Cerro Gordo Sunday School, Illinois 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11855, $ 180 00 

Receipt No. 12351, 180 00 $ 360 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Dr. A. R. Cottrell, India $ 360 00 

Virden and Girard Sunday Schools, Illinois 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11885 $ 75 00 

Receipt No. 11913, 15 00 

Receipt No. 11992, 90 00 

Receipt No. 12336, 90 00 

Receipt No. 12347, 90 00 $ 360 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Dr. Laura M. Cottrell, India, $ 360 00 

Oakley Congregation and Sunday School, Illinois 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12241, $ 230 80 

Receipt No. 12659, 360 00 $ 590 80 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Ida Buckingham, Sweden, $ 360 00 

Deficit from last year, 230 80 $ 590 80 

Peach Blossom Congregation, Maryland 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12135, $ 115 00 

Receipt No. 12781, 125 00 $ 240 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Anna Hutchison ( 2 / 3 ), in China, $ 233 33 

Balance to new year 6 67 $ 240 00 



76 Annual Report 

Dallas Center Sunday School, Iowa 

Receipts — 

Balance from last year, $ 4 00 

Receipt No. 11890, 50 00 

Receipt No. 12378, 50 00 

Receipt No. 12446, 20 00 $ 124 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Anna Hutchison (*^), in China, $ 116 67 

Balance to new year, 7 33 % 124 00 

North-western Ohio Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Balance from last year, $ 30 00 

Receipt No. 12110, . . . . : 150 00 

Receipt No. 12494, 180 00 $ 360 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Hattie Z. Alley, India, $ 360 00 

Northeastern Ohio Sunday Schools 

No Receipts. 
Expenditures — 

Support Sister Goldie Swartz, India, $ 360 00 

Balance due to new year, 360^00 $ 720 00 

Southern Ohio Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12430, $ 175 00 

Receipt No. 12672 710 00 $ 885 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Brother J. M. Pittenger, $ 360 00 

Support Brethren O. C. Sollenberger and J. H. Bright, 495 65 

Balance to new year, 29 35 $ 885 00 

Hereafter the accounts of Eversole congregation and South- 
ern Ohio Sunday Schools will appear separately. 

Lick Creek Congregation, Ohio 

Receipts — 

Balance from last year, $ 290 00 

Receipt No. 11846, 140 00 

Receipt No. 45625, ' •. 180 00 $ 610 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Elizabeth Kintner, India, $ 360 00 

For School Expenses, 87 00 

Balance to new year, 163 00 $ 610 00 

Bear Creek Congregation, Ohio 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12650, $ 180 00 

Conference Offering, 360 00 $ 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Anna M. Eby, China, $ 360 00 

Balance to new year, 180 00 $ 

Salem Congregation, Ohio 

Receipts — 

Balance from last year, $ 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Minnie F. Bright, China, $ 

Trotwood Congregation, Ohio 

Receipts — 

Balance from last year, $ 90 61 

Conference Offering, 396 30 $ 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Elizabeth Oberholtzer, China, $ 350 00 

Balance to new year, 136 91 $ 

Painter Creek Congregation, Ohio 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11851, $ 175 00 

Receipt No. 12325, 175 00 $ 

Expenditures — 

Support Dr. O. G. Brubaker, China, $ 



540 00 


540 00 


350 00 


350 00 


486 91 


486 91 


350 00 


350 00 



$ 


338 66 


$ 


338 66 


$ 


360 00 


$ 


360 00 



Annual Report 77 

^ . . East Nimishillen Congregation, Ohio 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12567, $ 284 66 

Receipt No. 12640 12 00 

Receipt No. 12641, 19 50 

Transfer from World-wide missions, 22 50 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Anna M. Brumbaugh, $ 160 00 

Balance to new year, 178 66 

Altoona Sunday School, Pennsylvania 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12683, 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Ida Himmelsbaugh, India, 

Shade Creek, Rummel, Scalp Level Congregations 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12442 $ 90 00 

Receipt No. 12495, 90 00 

Receipt No. 12492, 180 00 $ 360 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Anna Z. Blough, India, $ 360 00 

Oiler Memorial Fund 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11873, $ 175 00 

Receipt No. 12126, 175 00 

Receipt No. 12341, 175 00 

Receipt No. 12599, 175 00 $ 700 00 

Expenditures — 

Transferred to World-wide Missions, $ 700 00 

Huntingdon Congregation and College, Pa. 

Receipts — 

Conference Offering, $ 360 00 

Expenditures — ■ 

Support Brother J. M. Blough, India, $ 360 00 

Tulpehocken Congregation, Pennsylvania 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11925, $ 150 00 

Receipt No. 12043, 10 00 

Receipt No. 12400 150 00 

Receipt No. 12658, 50 00 $ 360 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister B. Mary Royer, India, $• 360 00 

Elizabethtown Congregation, Pennsylvania 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12136, $ 175 00 

. Receipt No. 12399, 175 00 

Receipt No. 12659, 10 00 $ 360 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Bessie M. Rider, India, $ 350 00 

Balance to new year, 10 00 $ 360 00 

Woodbury Congregation, Pennsylvania 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11929, $ 90 00 

Receipt No. 12480, .".... 180 00 $ 270 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Florence Pittenger, India, $ 360 00 

Deficit from last year, 150 00 $ 510 00 

Balance due new year $ 240 00 

Midway Congregation, Pennsylvania 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11926 $ 150 00 

Receipt No. 12401, 150 00 

Receipt No. 12667, 60 00 $ 360 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Bro. J. F. Graybill, Sweden, $ 360 00 



78 Annual Report 

Chiques Congregation, Pennsylvania 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12243, $ 180 00 

Receipt No. 12666, 180 00 $ 360 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Alice Graybill, Sweden, $ 360 00 

Southeastern Kansas Christian Workers 

Receipts — 

Balance from last year, '.$ 154 90 

Receipt No. 11848, 30 00 

Receipt No. 12256, 30 00 

Receipt No. 12671, 145 10 $ 360 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister E. H. Eby, India, $ 360 00 

G. E. Shirkey 

Receipts — 

Balance from last year, . $ 120 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Bro. E. H. Eby, India, $ 

Balance due to new year, $ 

Isaiah and Olive Brenaman 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11818, $ 180 00 

Receipt No. 12390, 180 00 $ 

Expenditures — 

Support Bro. John I. Kaylor, India, $ 

C. H. Erb and Wife 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11787, $ 175 00 

Receipt No. 12415, 175 00 $ 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Cora Brubaker, China, $ 

La Verne Congregation and Sunday School, California 

Receipts — 

Balance from last year, $ 350 00 

Receipt No. 12426, 350 00 $ 

Expenditures — 

Support Brother and Sister Ernest Vaniman, China, $ 

Northwestern Kansas Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12359, $ 180 00 

Receipt No. 12680, .'. 180 00 $ 

Expenditures — 

Support Bro. H. L. Alley, India, $ 

Northeastern Kansas Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12316, $ 180 00 

Receipt No. 12636, 180 00 $ 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Ella Ebbert, India, $ 

Southwestern Kansas Congregations 

Receipts- 
Receipt No. 12276, $ 350 00 

Receipt No. 12656, 330 00 $ 680 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Brother and Sister F. H. Crumpacker, China, ...... $ 700 00 

Balance due to new year, $ 20 00 

Middle Missouri Congregations 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11782 .-$ 175 15 

Receipt No. 12211, 158 45 $ 333 60 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Jennie Mohler, India, ., . , . $ 360 00 



360 00 
240 00 


360 00 


360 00 


350 00 


350 00 


700 00 


700 00 


360 00 


360 00 


360 00 


360 00 



Annual Report 79 

Deficit from last year, 122 10 $ 482 10 

Balance due new year, $ 148 50 

North and South English River Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Balance from last year, $ 1 00 

Receipt No. 12048, 60 00 

Receipt No. 12078 117 00 

Receipt No. 12535, 57 00 

Receipt No. 12539, 117 00 $ 352 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Nettie M. Senger, China, $ 350 00 

Balance to new year, 2 00 $ 352 00 

Coon River Congregation, Iowa 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12532, $ 360 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Elizabeth Arnold, India, $ 360 00 

Manchester College Sunday School 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12160, $ 65 00 

Receipt No. 12677, 360 00 

Conference Offering 150 00 $ 575 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Laura J. Shock, China, $ 350 00 

Deficit from last year, 215 00 

Balance to new year, 10 00 $ 575 00 

Northern Iowa Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12168, $ 350 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Anna V. Blough, China, $ 350 00 

Middle Maryland Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11950 $ 180 00 

Receipt No. 12429, 180 00 $ 360 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Bro. H. P. Garner, India, $ 360 00 

Idaho and Western Montana Christian Workers 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11891, $ 180 00 

Receipt No. 12326, 180 00 $ 360 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Anetta C. Mow, India, $ 360 00 

Mexico City, Indiana 

Receipts — 

Balance from last year, $ 35 00 

Receipt No. 12477, 360 00 

Conference Offering, 180 00 $ 575 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Lillian Grisso, India, $ 360 00 

Balance to new year, 215 00 $ 575 00 

Knob Creek Congregation, Tennessee 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11799, $ 175 00 

Receipt No. 11979, 175 00 $ 350 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Anna B. Seese, China, $ 350 00 

Deficit from last year, ^ . 175 00 $ 525 00 

Balance due to new year, $ 175 00 

Monitor Congregation, Kansas 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12227, $ 350 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Myrtle Pollock, China, $ 350 00 



80 Annual Report 

Pleasant Valley Congregation, Virginia 

Receipts — 

Conference Offering, ( $ 360 60 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Edna Flory, China, $ 350 00 

Deficit from last year, 166 59 $ 516 59 

Balance due new year, $ 155 99 

Barren Ridge Congregation, Virginia 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 1247S, $ 98 78 

Conference Offering, \ . 251 22 $ 350 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Nora Flory, China, $ 350 -00 

Deficit from last year, 70 70 $ 420 70 

Balance due new year, . $ 70 70 

Middle River Congregation, Virginia 

Receipts — 

Balance from last year, $ 1 75 

Receipt No. 11935, 367 00 $ 368 75 

Expenditures — 

Support Bro. Byron M. Flory, China, $ 350 00 

Balance to new year, 18 75 $ 368 75 

Lebanon Congregation, Virginia 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12179 $ 87 50 

Receipt No. 12328, 233 34 

Receipt No. 12653, 29 16 $ 350 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Valley V. Miller, $ 320 65 

Balance to new year, 29 35 $ 350 00 

Timberville Congregation, Virginia 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12344, $ 175 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Bro. E. M. Wampler, China, $ 175 00 

North Manchester Sunday School, Indiana 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11652, $ 180 00 

Receipt No. 12375, 180 00 $ 360 00 

Expenditures-r 

Support Sister Alice K. Ebey, India, $ 360 00 

Locust Grove Sunday School, Indiana 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11849, $ 175 00 

Receipt No. 12428, 180 00 $ 355 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Sue R. Heisey, China, $ 350 00 

Balance to new year, 5 00 $ 355 00 

Walnut Grove Sunday School, Pennsylvania 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11838, $ 175 00 

Conference Offering, 175 00 $ 350 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Bro. Samuel Bowman, China, $ 350 00 

Nezperce Congregation, Idaho 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12165, .........$ 146 00 

Receipt No. 12357, 175 00 

Receipt No. 12689 , . . 29 00 $ 350 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Dr. D. L. Horning, China, $ 350 00 



Annual Report 81 

White Oak Congregation, Pennsylvania 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12182, $ 360 00 

No Expenditures. 

Michigan Sunday Schools 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11795, $ 15 00 

Receipt No. 11863, 245 00 

Receipt No. 12278, 210 00 $ 470 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Pearl S. Bowman, China, $ 350 00 

Balance to new year, 120 00 $ 470 00 

Myers Brothers 

Receipts- 
Receipt No. 12469, $ 146 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Bro. M. M. Myers, Ch ina, $ 320 65 

Money returned, 147 40 $ 468 05 

Balance due to new year, $ 322 05 

Elk Run and Greenmount Congregations, Virginia 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12673, $ 175 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Sarah Z. Myers, China, $ 

Balance due to new year, $ 

J. D. Yoder 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12589, $ 321 00 

Receipt No. 12638, # 29 0Q $ 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Lulu Ullom, China, $ 321 00 

Balance to new year, 29 00 $ 

South Waterloo Christian Workers 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12679, $ 

Expenditures — 

Support Bro. A. S. B. Miller, India, $ 

Franklin Grove Congregation, Illinois 

Receipts — 

Transfer from World-wide Missions, $ 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Bertha L. Butterbaugh, India, $ 

Buck Creek Sunday School and Congregation 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12525, ' $ 304 75 

Receipt No. 12664, 55 25 $ 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Nettie L. Bowman, India, $ 180 00 

Balance to new year, 180 00 $ 

Noah Blickenstaff and Wife 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12643, $ 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Verna Blickenstaff, India, $ 165 00 

Balance to new year, 195 00 $ 

Quemahoning Congregation, Pennsylvania 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12502, $ 

Expenditures — 

Support Bro. Q. A. Holsopple, India, $ 

Seventh Circuit Sunday Schools, Pennsylvania 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12678, $ 180 00 



320 65 
145 65 


350 00 


350 00 


60 00 


60 00 


180 00 


180 00 


360 00 


360 00 


360 00 


360 00 


180 00 


180 00 



82 Annual Report 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Kathren Holsopple, India, $ 180 00 

United Student Volunteers 

Receipts — 

Conference Offering, $ 350 00 

No Expenditures. ' 

Virden Congregation, Illinois 
Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12684, ; $ 180 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Bro. C. G. Shull, India, $ 180 00 

Andrews Congregation, Indiana 

Receipts — 

Conference Offering, ... $ 300 00 

No Expenditures. 

Sandy Creek, West Virginia 
Receipts — 

Conference Offering, $ 360 00 

No Expenditures. -* 

Pipe Creek Congregation, Indiana 
Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12479, $ 175 00 

Receipt No. 12676, 5 00 $ 180 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister D. L. Forney, $ 165 00 

Balance to new year, 15 00 $ 180 00 

Hagerstown Young People's Society 

Receipts — 

Conference Offering, * $ 350 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Bro. E. M. Wampler, $ 320 65 

Balance to new year, >. . 29 35 $ 350 00 

A. C. Daggett 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12485, $ 350 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Martha Horning, China, $ 175 00 

Balance to new year, 175 00 $ 350 00 

New Carlisle, West Charleston, Donnels Creek, and Springfield Congs. 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12493, , ' $ 175 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Bro. O. C. Sollenberger, China, $ 175 0( 

Butterbaugh Family 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12501, $ 180 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Bro. A. G. Butterbaugh, India, $ 180 00 

Waynesboro Sunday School 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12471, $ 350 00 

Receipt No. 12621, 700 00 $ 1,050 00 

No Expenditures. 

Middle Pennsylvania Congregations 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12496, $ 360 00 

Expenditures — 

Support Sister Sarah Replogle, $ 235 00 

Balance to new year, 125 00 $ 360 00 

' Pleasant View Sunday School 

Receiots — 

Receipt No. 12376, $ 175 00 

No Expenditures. 



Annual Report 



83 



13. Miscellaneous Supports of Missionary Children 

Receipts — 

Receipt No. 11793, $ 8 00 

Receipt No. 11823, 6 93 

Receipt No. 11909, 45 00 

Receipt No. 11953, 25 00 

Receipt No. 12032, 75 00 

Receipt No. 12283, 37 50 

Receipt No. 45583, 28 98 

Receipt No. 45614, 25 00 

Receipt No. 45674, 25 00 

Receipt No. 45680, 45 00 

Receipt No. 45698, 37 50 

Receipt No. 45779, 22 50 

Receipt No. 12370, 22 50 

Receipt No. 12475, 75 00 

Receipt No. 12476, 36 09 

Receipt No. 12516, 22 50 

Receipt No. 12570, 10 98 

• Receipt No. 12644, 75 00 

Receipt No. 12658, 25 00 $ 



648 48 



14. India Native Workers 



Receipts- 

Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 



pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
ipt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
ipt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
ipt No. 
ipt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
ipt No. 
ipt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
ipt No. 
ipt No. 



11681, $ 5 00 

11700 15 00 

11701 50 00 

11706 5 00 

11725, ' 30 00 

11736, 100 00 

11742 15 00 

11754 15 00 

11755, 60 00 

11758, 50 00 

11764, 15 00 

11776, 7 70 

11791, 5 00 

11794, 12 50 

11796, 30 00 

11797, 15 00 

11798, 56 00 

11802, 5 00 

11813 25 00 

11814 45 00 

11816, 75 00 

11818, 60 00 

11824, 60 00 

11825, 25 00 

11829, 75 00 

11835, 60 00 

11837, 10 42 

11840, 25 00 

11847, 62 56 

11850, 15 00 

11884, 75 00 

11887, 75 00 

11889, 60 00 

11894, 7 79 

11895, 5 00 

11896, 60 00 

11920, 15 00 

11930 5 00 

11964, 37 50 

11966, 15 00 



Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Tran 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 



pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
ipt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
ipt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
ipt No. 
pt No. 
ipt No. 
fer, . 
ipt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 
pt No. 



11967, 

11985, 

11987, 

11988, 

12010, 

12011, 

12012, 

12013, 

12015, 

12017, 

10018, 

10019,' 

12045, 

12046, 

12060, 

12061, 

12062, 

12082, 

12083, 

12087, 

12097, 

12111, 

12112, 

12124, 

12136, 

12141, 

12142, 

12147, 

12164, 

12183, 

12196, 

12204, 

12208, 



12218, 
12226, 
12230, 
12249, 
12251, 



5 00 


12 50 


5 00 


8 60 


18 75 


33 00 


30 00 


15 00 


10 00 


37 50 


15 00 


30 00 


15 00 


30 00 


5 00 


30 00 


30 00 


37 50 


75 00 


12 50 


15 00 


30 00 


10 00 


13 52 


72 00 


5 00 


15 00 


15 00 


44 62 


20 00 


25 00 


5 00 


20 00 


29 92 


30 00 


30 00 


15 00 


5 00 


15 00 



Total, $ 2,254 88 



84 



Annual Report 



15. India Transmissions 



Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 
Rece 



pt No. 11698 $ 300 00 

pt No. 11734, 5 00 

pt No. 11738, 8 00 

pt No. 11758, 75 

pt No. 11778, 5 00 

pt No. 11804. 6 00 

pt No. 11805, 15 00 

pt No. 11826, 15 00 

pt No. 11834 30 00 

pt No. 11836, 1 00 

pt No. 11900, 40 00 

pt No. 11957, 13 50 

pt No. 12009, 20 00 

pt No. 12034, 10 00 

pt No. 12035, 15 82 

pt No. 12037, 8 65 

pt No. 12022, 25 00 

pt No. 12041, 34 00 

pt No. 12044, 20 00 

pt No. 12172, 5 00 

pt No. 12181, 10 55 

pt No. 12198 320 00 

pt No. 12199, 5 00 

pt No. 12238, 30 00 

pt No. 12242, 50 00 

pt No. 12261, 5 00 

pt No. 12265, 9 00 

pt No. 12274. 5 00 

pt No. 12275, 24 00 



Receipt No. 12297, 10 00 

Receipt No. 12307, 11 25 

Receipt No. 12311, 27 35 

Receipt No. 12312, 46 50 

Receipt No. 12318, x . . . . 10 50 

Receipt No. 12324, 2 00 

Receipt No. 12329, 10 00 

Receipt No. 12334, 43 00 

Receipt No. 12335, 50 00 

Receipt No. 12348, 2 00 

Receipt No. 12358, 100 00 

Receipt No. 12360, 30 00 

Receipt No. 12366, 10 00 

Receipt No. 12367, 50 00 

Receipt No. 12368, 5 25 

Receipt No. 12398, 30 00 

Receipt No. 12420, 112 00 

Receipt No. 12435, 2 85 

Receipt No. 12439, 5 00 

Receipt No. 12464, 5 00 

Receipt No. 12477, 10 00 

Receipt No. 12515, 6 50 

Receipt No. 12562, 25 00 

Receipt No. 12610, 7 00 

No Receipt issued, 18 00 

No Receipt issued, 3 24 

Total, $ 1,668 71 



16. China Native Workers 



Receipt No. 11651, $ 30 00 

Receipt No. 11704, 8 00 

Receipt No. 11706, 5 00 

Receipt No. 11707, 10 00 

Receipt No. 11723, 18 75 

Receipt No. 11724, 75 00 

Receipt No. 11735, 10 00 

Receipt No. 11756, 9 00 

Receipt No. 11762, 15 00 

Receipt No. 11770, 10 00 

Receipt No. 11771, 15 00 

Receipt No. 11777 16 43 

Receipt No. 11781, 15 00 

Receipt No. 11791, 5 00 

Receipt No. 11803, 18 75 

Receipt No. 11815, 15 00 

Receipt No. 11819, 37 50 

Receipt No. 11833 50 00 

Receipt No. 11853, 18 75 

Receipt No. 11854, : 25 00 

Receipt No. 11869, 100 00 

Receipt No. 11874, 7 60 

Receipt No. 11875, ..." 7 60 

Receipt No. 11888, 15 00 

Receipt No. 11904, 15 00 

Receipt No. 11930 5 00 

Receipt No. 11944, 75 00 

Receipt No. 11945, 75 00 

Receipt No. 11989 22 00 

Receipt No. 12020, 15 00 



Receipt 


No. 


12021, 


Receipt 


No. 


12026, 


Receipt 


No. 


12047, 


Receipt 


No. 


12051, 


Receipt 


No. 


12066, 


Receipt 


No. 


12153, 


Receipt 


No. 


12074, 


Receipt 


No. 


12075, 


Receipt 


No. 


12085, 


Receipt 


No. 


12087, 


Receipt 


No. 


12092, 


Receipt 


No. 


12093, 


Receipt 


No, 


12103, 


Receipt 


No. 


12112, 


Receipt 


No. 


12125, 


Receipt 


No. 


12133, 


Receipt 


No. 


12139, 


Receipt 


No. 


12140, 


Receipt 


No. 


12157, 


Receipt 


No. 


12167, 


Receipt 


No. 


12188, 


Receipt 


No. 


12189, 


Receipt 


No. 


12200, 


Receipt 


No. 


12220, 


Receipt 


No. 


12229, 


Receipt 


No. 


12245, 


Receipt 


No. 


12250, 


Receipt 


No. 


12255, 



29 50 


19 78 


10 00 


20 00 


10 02 


54 00 


50 00 


37 50 


37 50 


36 00 


15 00 


15 00 


15 00 


10 00 


15 00 


7 19 


7 60 


7 60 


48 00 


15 00 


25 00 


75 00 


8 00 


5 15 


40 00 


30 00 


5 00 


18 75 



Total, $ 1,410 97 



Annual Report 



85 



17. China Transmissions 



Receipt No. 11685, $ 50 00 

Receipt No. 11702, 20 00 

Receipt No. 11757, 5 00 

Receipt No. 11758, 25 

Receipt No. 11778 5 00 

Receipt No. 11902, ». 5 33 

Transfer, 14 98 

Receipt No. 11965, 20 00 

Receipt No. 12036 20 00 

Transfer, 7 00 

Receipt No. 12099, 15 00 

Receipt No. 12149, 18 50 

Receipt No. 12198, 10 00 

Receipt No. 12235, 12 00 

Transfer, 100 00 

Receipt No. 12237 5 00 

Receipt No. 12238, 5 10 

Receipt No. 12269, 3 80 



Receipt 

Receipt 

Receipt 

Receipt 

Receipt 

Receipt 

Receipt 

Receipt 

Receipt 

Receipt No. 

Receipt Xo. 

Receipt Xo. 

Receipt Xo. 

Receipt No. 

Receipt No. 



No. 
No. 
Xo. 
No. 
No. 
Xo. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



12286, 
12298, 
12315, 
12380, 
12391, 
12394, 
12402, 
12427, 
12435, 
12445, 
12481, 
12530, 
12577, 
12632, 
12662, 



10 00 


5 00 


14 73 


25 00 


30 00 


25 00 


5 50 


40 00 


2 85 


5 00 


30 00 


10 00 


12 00 


50 00 


21 20 



Total, $ 603 24 



18. Ping Ting Hospital 

Receipts — 

Donations, reported in Visitor, $ 787 71 

Receipt No. 12228, for hospital ward, 1,000 00 $ 1,787 71 

19. Liao Chou Hospital 

Receipts — 

Donations, reported in Visitor, $ 199 26 

Receipt No. 12213, Memorial to Master Lester William 

Schrock, deceased, 53 68 $ 252 94 



20. Annual Meeting Committees 

Expenditures — 

Expense of Auditing Committee, 1919, $ 386 10 

21. Publication Account 

Expenditures — 

Tracts and carriage on same, less receipts, $ 921 33 

Rebate on old Book and Tract Accounts, 222 39 

Missionary Gospel Messengers and Periodicals to mis- 
sionaries, 1,334 90 

Missionary Visitor, less receipts 10,739 39 

Missionary Education, books, pamphlets, lantern slides, etc., 

less receipts, 2,228 96 $15,446 97 

22. General Expense Account 

Expenditures — 

Board's Traveling Expense, $ 628 60 

Salaries 5,395 32 

Traveling Secretaries, 3,122 76 

Postage, 640 42 

Steel files for vault 310 00 

Two typewriters and stencils for addressograph, 177 85 

Legal services, 10140 

Installation of new set of books 145 66 

Carpentry work, shelves, cases, etc., : 148 00 

Fidelity Bond, 50 00 

Traveling expense, etc., 121 56 

Office supplies, medical exams, printing, stationery, phone 

rent, telegrams, etc., 1,540 97 $ 12,382 54 



86 



Annual Report 



23. District Mission Work 

Expenditures — 

Southeast Pennsylvania, $ 

Northern Illinois, for Douglas Park, 

Oregon, 

Northwest Ohio, .• 

Southern Iowa, 

Southwest Kansas, 

Arkansas, 

Oklahoma, 

Texas and Louisiana, 

Northwest Kansas and Northeast Colorado, 

Southern California and Arizona, 

Michigan, 



p 180 00 


750 00 


200 00 


500 00 


600 00 


500 00 


250 00 


500 00 


800 00 


500 00 


300 00 


300 00 



$ 5,380 00 



24. West Alexandria Farm, Ohio 

Receipts — 

Sale of Property, 

Expenditures — 

Deficit from last year, $ - 

Balance to World-wide Endowment, 



108 36 
947 62 



$ 1,055 98 



$ 1,055 98 



25. Endowment Funds 



Donations to World-Wide— 

11671, $ 200 00 



11675, 
11676, 
11683, 
11684, 
11710, 
11731, 
11766, 
11806, 
11820, 
11842, 
11919, 
11954, 
11595, 
11981, 
11994, 
12008, 
12014, 
751, 
12033, 
12098, 
12108, 
12114, 
12137, 
12854, 
12185, 
12186, 
12339, 
12345, 
12346, 
12351, 
12363, 
12417, 
12419. 



700 00 

1,200 00 

4,000 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 

500 00 

200 00 

20 00 

1,000 00 

100 00 

12 50 

400 00 

500 00 

500 00 

2,000 00 

2,400 00 

400 00 

1,712 29 

600 00 

1,000 00 

1,400 00 

1,500 00 

500 00 

100 00 

1,000 00 

2 00 

1,000 00 

100 00 

500 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 

199 75 

150 00 



12460, 
12461, 
12466, 
12487, 
12488, 
12489, 
12490, 
12499, 
12500, 
12503, 
12505, 
12506, 
12507, 
12508, 
12517, 
12519, 
12527, 
12528, 
12540, 
12550, 
12549, 
12572, 
12573, 
12583, 
12584, 
12594, 
12597, 
12607, 
12616, 
12634, 
12642, 
From 
From 



W. Alexandria Estate, 
Gilbert Est., N. Car., 



5 00 

2,500 00 

2,500 00 

100 00 

50 00 

20 00 

100 00 

100 00 

500 00 

50 00 

. 20 00 

25 00 

20 00 

50 00 

50 00 

1,000 00 

300 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

300 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

20 00 

20 00 

1,024 91 

500 00 

150 00 

2,000 00 

20 00 

500 00 

3,750 00 

947 62 



Total donations to World-wide Endowment for year, 
Less transfers to other funds and refund, 



,$ 44,167 07 
5,800 00 



Total increase in World-wide Endowment for year, $ 3S,367 07 

Total on hand at beginning of year, $946,636 87 $985,003 94 



Annual Report 



87 



Gospel Mess 

Balance 


enger 

from 

subsc 

luity F 

from 


Endowment- 
old year, . . 






. .$ 12 460 00 




One life 


ription, 






25 00 


$ 12,485 00 
$137,117 21 

100 00 
100 00 
500 00 


Mission Anr 

Balance 


'unds — 

old year, . . . 








Receipt No. 
11720, .. 
11730, .. 
11740, .. 




. $ 150 00 

1,500 00 

1,000 00 

4,000 00 

7,000 00 

500 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 

600 00 

1,470 00 

200 00 

250 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 

2,000 00 

12,000 00 


12432, 

12440, 

12441, 




11769, .. 
11860, .. 


12474, 

12462, 

12498, 

12526, .... 
12534, ..... 

12536, 

12541, 

12544, 

12569, 

12581, 

12591, 

12592, 

12611, 




2,500 00 

1,000 00 

200 00 


11872, .. 






11923, .. 
11980, .. 

12023, .. 

12024, .. 
12079, .. 
J. B., .. 






1,000 00 

400 00 

5,000 00 

3,000 00 

11,000 00 

250 00 


12253, .. 
12302, .. 






3,700 00 
500 00 


12313, .. 
12271, .. 


nation 
isfers 


s for year, 
to World-wi 


500 00 
1,200 00 


12273, ... 
Total do 




. $ 55 120 00 




Less trai 


de Endowment, 


2,000 00 





Total increase in Fund during year, $ 53,120 00 

Total on hand at the beginning of year, $137,117 21 $190,237 21 



India Endowment — 

Receipts — 

Balance from old year, $ 4,260 00 

Receipt No. 12346, 350 00 $ 

China Endowment — 

Receipts — 



4,610 00 



Balance from old year. No increase, 

H. H. Rohrer Endowment Fund — 
Receipts — 

Balance from old year. No increase, 

Ministerial and Missionary Endowment — 
Receipts — 

Receipt No. 12121, 

Ministerial and Missionary Relief — 
Receipts — 

Balance from old year $ 

Receipt No. 12221, 



500 00 
5 00 






26. Statement of Ledger 

Cash, $ 21,800 28 

World-Wide Fund, 

Accounts Receivable, 

Suspense Account, 

Petty Cash, 

(Cash $83,784 45) 

CHURCH EXTENSION 

Church Extension Fund, 

Bills Receivable, $ 

(Cash $4,535 49) 

INDIA FUND 

Rhodes Memorial Fund, 

Quinter Memorial Hospital, 

India Boarding School, 

India V. C. F., 819 D, 

India V. C. F., 819 D, 

Anklesvar Churchhouse, 

(Cash $14,924 14) 



$ 2,350 00 



$ 1,000 00 



10 00 



505 00 



$ 84,105 08 



193 83 

26 80 

100 00 




167 90 


$ 11,703 39 




$ 3,216 00 

6,571 91 

884 04 

150 00 

2,025 00 

2,077 19 



88 Annual Report 

CHINA FUND 

South China Missions, $ 549 92 

China Hospital, $ 225 18 

Liao Chou Hospital, 

Ping Ting Hospital, 

Liao Chou Memorial Church, 

Girls' Dormitories, Ping Ting, 

(Cash $2,334 00) 

SPECIAL FUNDS 

Africa, 

Japan, 

Philippines, 

Porto Rico, 

Work Among Arabs, 

South America, 

Southern Native White, . 

New England Mission, 

Cuba Mission, 

Australia, 

Jerusalem, 

Italian Mission, 

Colored Mission, 

Colored Mission, Industrial, 

(Cash $4,076 59) 

MISCELLANEOUS FUNDS 

Stover Lecture Foundation, 

Ministerial and Missionary Relief, 

Gish Testament Fund, $ 318 47 

Gish Publishing Fund, 647 93 

Sweden Churchhouse, 

Sweden Mission Relief, 

Home Missions, 

(Cash $9,966 19) 

SPECIAL SUPPORT FUNDS 

Middle Pennsylvania Sunday Schools, 

Western Pennsylvania Sunday Schools, 

Pipe Creek Congregation, Maryland, 

Cedar Rapids Congregation, 

First Church, Philadelphia, 

Mt. Morris College Missionary Society, 

Northern Indiana Sunday Schools, 

Middle Indiana Sunday Schools, $ 309 73 

Bethel Congregation and Sunday School, 200 00 

Second Virginia Congregations, 332 85 

First and Southern Virginia Sunday Schools, 

Bridgewater Sunday School, 

Southern Illinois Sunday Schools, 491 00 

Peach Blossom Congregation, 

Dallas Center Sunday School, 

Northeastern Ohio Sunday Schools, 360 00 

Southern Ohio Sunday Schools, 

Lick Creek Congregation, 

Bear Creek Congregation, 

Trotwood Congregation, 

East Nimishillen, 

Elizabethtown Congregation, 

Woodbury Congregation, 240 00 

G. E. Shirkey, 240 00 

Southwestern Kansas Congregations, 20 00 

Middle Missouri Congregations, 148 50 

North and South English River Sunday Schools, 2 00 

Manchester College Sunday School, " 10 00 

Mexico Congregation, 215 00 

Knob Creek Congregation, 175 00 

Pleasant Valley Congregation, 155 99 

Barren Ridge Congregation, 70 70 

Middle River Congregation, 18 75 



165 71 


272 62 


1,170 93 


400 00 


$ 147 51 


85 30 


81 40 


234 42 


50 00 


150 34 


182 23 


202 50 


331 27 


16 00 


200 66 


1,846 11 


151 10 


397 75 


$ 362 66 


8,167 94 


1,926 58 


72 25 


403 16 


$ 360 00 


135 19 


60 03 


350 00 


300 00 


420 00 


20 00 


175 00 


350 00 


6 67 


7 33 


29 35 


163 00 


180 00 


136 91 


178 66 


10 00 



Annual Report 89 

Lebanon Congregation, 29 35 

White Oak Congregation, 360 00 

Locust Grove Congregation, 5 00 

Nezperce Congregation, 29 00 

Michigan Sunday Schools, 120 00 

Myers Brothers, 322 05 

Elk Run and Greenmount Congregations, 145 65 

J. H. Yoder, 29 00 

Buck Creek Congregation, 180 00 

Noah Blickenstaff and Wife, 195 00 

Pleasant View Congregation, ". 175 00 

Sandy Creek Congregation, 360 00 

Pipe Creek Congregation, Indiana, 15 00 

Hagerstown Young People's Society, 29 35 

A. C Daggett 175 00 

Waynesboro Sunday Schools, 1,050 00 

Middle Pennsylvania Congregations, 125 00 

United Student Volunteer, 350 00 

Andrews Congregation, 300 00 

Leland C. Moomaw, 350 00 

(Cash $3,793 12) 

INTEREST BEARING FUNDS 

Ministerial and Missionary Relief Annuity, $ 10 00 

Denmark Poor Fund, 3,944 90 

Brethren Publishing House Investment, $131,150 00 

India Endowment, 4,610 00 

China Endowment, 2,350 00 

H. H. Rohrer, 1,000 00 

Gospel Messenger, 12,485 00 

World-wide Endowment, 985,003 94 

Endowment Bills Receivable, 1,225,131 76 

Reiff Estate, Philadelphia, : < 1,783 20 

Gish Estate, 56,667 08 

Mission Annuity, 190,237 21 

Ministerial and Missionary Relief Annuity, 505 00 

D. C. Moomaw Property 361 87 

(Cash overdrawn $101,613 70) 

27. Statement of Cash 

World-Wide Fund, $ 83,784 45 

Church Extension, 4,535 49 

India Funds, 14,924 14 

China Funds, 2,334 00 

Special Funds, 4,076 59 

Miscellaneous Funds, 9,966 19 

Special Funds, 3,793 12 

Interest Bearing Funds $101,613 70 

Cash, 21,800 28 

Totals, $123,413 98 $123,413 98 

28. Interest Bearing Funds Received During the Year 

Receipts — 

Bills Receivable, Loans Paid, $137,864 05 

Mission Endowment, 50,422 38 

World-Wide Endowment, 44,167 07 

India Endowment, 350 00 

Ministerial and Missionary Relief Endowment, 10 00 

Ministerial and Missionary Relief Annuity, 505 00 

Gospel Messenger Endowment, 25 00 

West Alexandria Farm, 1,055 98 

Overdrawn, 101,613 70 $336,013 18 

Expenditures — 

Bills Receivable, New Loans, $260,233 76 

Mission Endowment, 2,000 00 

World-Wide Endowment, 5,800 00 



90 Annual Report 

Reiff Estate, Philadelphia, 13 89 

D. C. Moomaw Property, 361 87 

Overdrawn last year, now paid back, 67,603 66 $336,013 18 

29. Assets 

Cash on hand, ..: . $ 21,800 28 

Bills Receivable, secured by mortgages, 1,225,131 76 

Brethren Publishing House, Investment, 131,150 00 

Church Extension, Bills Receivable, 8,175 50 

Reiff Estate, Philadelphia, . . . : 1,783 20 

Accounts Receivable, 193 83 

Petty Cash and Suspense Account, 126 80 



Total assets, March 1, 1920, $1,388,361 37 

Total assets, March 1, 1919 1,261,917 80 



Total increase for the year, $ 126,443 57 



Gish Publishing Fund 

The Gish Publishing Fund is administered by the General Mission Board, but the 
selection of books is delegated to a special committee. This committee for 1919 was 
J. W. Lear, H. A. Brandt and J. E. Miller. During the year Brother Brandt resigned 
and Edward Frantz was appointed to fill the vacancy. 

At the meeting of the committee in May, six books were dropped from the list and 
five were definitely added and two tentatively. The increase in price of books makes 
it uncertain as to how far the funds will go. This suggests that additions to the fund 
by direct gift or by bequest are always acceptable and are needed. 

The General Educational Board has prepared a " Ministers' Home Study Course." 
Arrangements have been made to furnish the books for this course to our ministers 
at cost, plus postage and packing. This course should be taken up by a large number 
of our ministers who are not now in school. The General Educational Board, Elgin, 111., 
will furnish full information concerning the course. 

The Gish Committee appreciates the helpful suggestions that have been made by 
ministers who keep posted on the best books. The committee aims to furnish sucl 
books as shall assist the largest number. It is necessary to keep in mind the needs oi 
the minister with limited education as well as the one with a thorough education. 
Because it is not possible to adopt all books that may be desired one must be satisfie* 
with what can be had, with the reasonable assurance that the interests of all will b< 
served in a measure. 

Record of Book Distribution 

Previouslyl Sent out ITotal to 
sent out Iduring 1919 1 .date 

Alone With God 2,496 80 2,576 

Annual Meeting Minutes, 937 937 

Archaeology and the Bible, . 445 98 543 

Bible Dictionary, . .-. 2,443 94 2,537 

Bible Manners and Customs, 2,034 2,034 

Bible Readings and Studies, 1,619 97 1,716 

Bible Atlas, 1,663 47 1,710 

Blaikie's Bible History, 1,208 100 1,308 

Book of Books, : 2,415 .... 2,415 

Bound Tracts, 2,499 .... 2,499 

Boy Problem in the Home, 503 136 639 

Bulwarks of the Faith, 703 .... 703 

(Continued on Page 95) 



Annual Report 



91 




During the month of April the Board sent out 
57,022 pages of tracts. 

Corrections: $50 credited to John Sprenkle in the 
May Visitor for the World-Wide Fund should have 
been credited to First Church, York, Pa., for the 
same purpose. $26 credited to D. R. Baldwin, South 
Dakota, in the May Visitor for the World-Wide 
Fund should have been credited to D. R. Baldwin, 
North Dakota, for the same purpose. $20 credited 
to E. N. Huffman in April Visitor for India Board- 
ing School should have been applied to India Native 
Worker. $50 credited to Perry Brunk in the May 
Visitor for India Share Plan should have been 
credited to Chester A. Brunk for the same purpose. 
$8 credited to Ellie Moler, North Carolina, in the 
May Visitor for the World-Wide Fund should have 
been credited to Ellie Moler, Southern District of 
Virginia. 

WORLD-WIDE 

Pennsylvania— $1,097.59 

Eastern District, Congregations, E. Fair- 
view, $34.67; Chiques, $106; Annville, $43.40; 
Akron, $19.25; Springville, $16; Elizabeth- 
town, $136.23; Mountville, $25.57; Windber, 
$35.28; E. Petersburg, $18.12; Little Swa- 
tara, $50; Mingo, $209.11; W. Green Tree, 
$4.50; Hatfield, $112; White Oak, $82.40; W. 
Conestoga, $38; Individuals, Maggie Zim- 
merman, 50c, $ 931 03 

Southern District, Congregation, Upper 
Cumberland, $9.50; Individuals, Mr. and 
Mrs. Clyde Lentz, $3.50; Susan Newcomer, 
$1; A Brother and Sister (Upper Cone- 
wago), $75 89 00 

Southeastern District, Congregations, 
Upper Dublin, $7.36; First Church, Phila- 
delphia, $20; Germantown, $46.30, 73 66 

Western District, Individuals, Eliza 
Reese, $2.90; D. P. Hoover, 50c; Harry Alli- 
son, 50c, 3 90 

Ohio— $419.44 

Northeastern District, Congregation, 
Freeburg, $333.41; Mrs. F. M. Arnold, 25c; 
A Brother, $8; A Brother (Canton). $30, .. 371 66 

Northwestern District, Individuals, H. V. 
Thomas, 50c; John Hane, $2.90; W. S. Co- 
canour, $1 4 40 

Southern District, Sunday-school, Bethel, 
$21.88; Individuals, L. A. Bookwalter, 50c; 

Levi Stoner, $11; J. W. Fidler, $10, 43 38 

Illinois— $169.31 

Northern District, Congregations, Rock 
Creek, $31; Mt. Morris, $27.11; Sunday- 
school, Dixon, $6.70; Individuals, A Sister 
in Chicago, $1; Geo. W. Wolfensberger, 
$100 165 81 

Southern District, Individuals, J. W. 

Angle, $1; Rilla Turney, $2.50, 3 50 

Indiana— $19.46 

Southern District, Individuals, A Sister 
in Rossville, $2; Lavina Fashbaugh, $3; D. 
L. Barnhart, 50c, 5 50 

Middle District, Individual, I. R. Beery, 1 00 

Northern District, Congregation, English 
Prairie, $4.35; Sunday-school, Children of 
the King (N. Winona S. S.), $7.09; Indi- 
viduals, Chas. C. Cripe, 5Qc; E. M. Rowe, $1, 12 94 
Virginia— $79.86 

First District, Sunday-school, Pleasant 
View (Chestnut Grove Cong.) 5 50 

Second District, Individuals, O. D. Sim- 
mons, $12; J. W. Wright, $1, 13 00 

Northern District, Congregations, Flat 
Rock, $9.38; Unity, $42.23; Individuals, W. 
F. Sherman, $4.25; Sarah Hylton, $2, ..*.... 57 86 

Southern District, Individuals, Susie 

Meador, $1; Emma Southall, $2.50, 3 50 

West Virginia— $68.00 

First District, Individuals, A Sister, $55; 
C J. McGee, $10 65 00 



Second District, Individuals, C. W. 

O'Brien and Wife, 3 00 

Oklahoma— $19.00 

Congregation, Washita, $14; Individual, 

Mrs. Jesse Spain, $5, 19 00 

South Dakota— $49.00 

Congregation, Willow Creek, $25; Indi- 
vidual, D. R. Baldwin, $24, 49 00 

Iowa— $510.50 

Southern District, Sunday-school, Ba- 
tavia, $2; Individual, Fannie V. Kirkpatrick 
(Deceased), $500, 502 00 

Northern District, Individuals, D. H. Kel- 
ler, 50c; Mary S. Newman, $8 8 50 

-Washington— $10.17 ^ 

Christian Workers, Olympia, $8.67; Indi- 
vidual, Wm. T. Larver, $1; W. A. Dear- 

dorff, 50c, 10 17 

Tennessee — $2.00 

Congregation, Pleasant View, 2 00 

Maryland— $1.00 

Eastern District, B. B. Brumbaugh, 100 

Kansas— $34.50 

Northeastern District, Individual, J. W. 
Mosier, 34 00 

Southwestern District, O. H. Feiler, 50 

Colorado— $2.00 

Southeastern District, Individual, W. S. 
Mick, : 100 

Western District, Individual, J. E. Bry- 
ant 1 00 

Michigan— $35.00 

Individuals. Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Sellers, 35 00 

Wyoming— $2.00 

Individual, Annetta Yarger 2 00 

North Dakota— $0.50 

Individual, J. D. Keller, 50 

Minnesota— $1.00 

Individual, Mrs. D. Broadwater 100 

California— $0.50 

Northern District, Individual, J. N. Gwin, 50 

Oregon— $0.25 

Individual, Daniel Stump, 25 

Montana— $0.50 

Individual, J. S. Geiser, 50 

Nevada— $5.00 

Individual, Mrs. Lizzie Cushman 5 00 

Total for the month, $ 2,526 56 

Previously reported, 3,045 35 

Total to date, $ 5,571 91 

INDIA BOARDING SCHOOL 

Pennsylvania— $368.67 

Eastern District, Sunday-schools, Begin- 
ners' Class (Lancaster), $2; Lebanon, $25; 
Chiques, $35; Aid Societies, West Green 
Tree, $17.50; White Oak, $20; Missionary 
Committee (Ridgely), $16.67; Individuals, 
D. M. Royer, $35; Lizzie S. Will, $35 $ 186 17 

Western District, Sunday-schools, Middle 
Creek, $20; Morrellville, $10; Willing Work- 
ers (Pike), $30; Aid Societies, Altoona, $20; 
Koontz, $35; Individuals, Sister E. E. Stine, 
$25 ; Elizabeth Brumbaugh, $2.50, 142 50 

Southern District, Individual, Receipt No. 

47518, 40 00 

Indiana— $98.75 

Northern District, Class No. 7 (Goshen 
S. S.), $7.50; Turkey Creek C. W., $8.75; 
Mrs. Henry Riches, $10, 26 25 

Southern District, Truth Seekers (Brick 
S. S.) 35 00 

Middle District, Adult New Movement 
Bible Class (No. Manchester S. S.), ...... 37 50 



92 



Annual Report 



Maryland— $77.00 

Eastern District, Sunday-schools, West- 
minster, $22; Edgewood, $5; Woodbury, $35; 
Primary and Junior Departments (Blue 

Ridge), $15 

Virginia— $63.00 

Second District, Elk Run Sunday-school, 

Northern District, Mrs. C. P. Harshbar- 

ger, $35; Dayton Aid, $25, ,.' 

Missouri — $41.34 

Southwestern District, Sunday-schools, 

Fairview, $19; Oak Grove, $22.34, 

Colorado— $9.00 

Southeastern District, Individual, Ella 

Smith, 

California— $52.50 

Northern District, Congregation, Empire, 
$15; Individuals, Paul J. Wilkinson, $8.75; 
Ruth E. Wilkinson, $8.75, 

Southern District, Sunday-school, Glean- 
ers (First Church, Los Angeles), 

Ohio— $75.00 

Southern District, Sunday-school, Bre- 
men, $25; Aid Society, Beach Grove, $25, 

Northeastern District, Congregation, 
Freeburg, $20; Individual, Master Delmer 

S. (Deceased), $5, 

Nebraska— $10.00 

Individual, A Sister, 

Illinois— $4.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school, Doug- 
las Park, 

Kansas— $14.80 

Northeastern District, Sunday- school, 

Morrill, 

Oregon— $10.00 

Sunday-school, Friendship Class (Port- 
land), 

Michigan— $37.50 

Sunday-school, Primary Class (Wood- 
land), 



Previously reported, 



511 51 



77 00 

3 00 

60 00 

41 34 

9 00 

32 50 
20 00 

50 00 



25 00 


1000 


4 00 


14 80 


10 00 


37 50 



Total for the month, $ 861 56 

Previously reported, 1,106 57 



Total to date, $ 1,968 13 



ANKLESVAR GIRLS' SCHOOL BUILDING 
California— $115.44 

Northern District, Aid Societies, 

Southern District, Aid Societies, S. Los 
Angeles, $12.64; Tropico, $2.50; Inglewood, 
$6.30; Santa Ana, $4; La Verne, $22.50; 

Pasadena, $17.50, 

Iowa— $68.95 

Middle District, Aid Societies, Beaver, 
$5; Brooklyn, $9.65; Panora, $7.50; Yale, 
$10; Dallas Center, $10; Des Moines, $5; 
Garrison, $4.65; Panther, $4.65, . .. 

Southern District, S. District Aid Socie- 
ties, 

Pennsylvania— $174.77 

Eastern District, Aid Societies, Harris- 
burg, $8.20; Aid Societies of Eastern Dis- 
trict, $141.57 

Southeastern District, Aid Society, Co- 
ventry, 

Michigan— $25.50 

Aid Societies, Woodland Village, 
Grand Rapids Aid, $4.25; Woodland 

$10; Thornapple, $5.25 

Virginia— $40.00 

Northern. District, Aid Society, E. 

Creek, $20; Harrisonburg, $20 

Illinois— $115.00 

Southern District, Aid Societies, 

Nebraska— $5.00 

Aid Society, Afton, 

Oregon— $2.50 

Aid Society, Newberg, , 

Idaho— $45.00 

Aid Societies, Weiser, $7.50; Aid Socie 
ties of Idaho, $37.50, 



$6; 
Aid, 



Mill 



50 00 



65 44 



56 45 
12 50 



149 77 
25 00 



25 50 



40 00 



115 00 



5 00 



2 50 



45 00 



Total to date, $ 1,103 67 

INDIA MISSIONS 
Illinois— $10.00 

Northern District, Individual, Mrs. Mar- 
garet Williams, 10 00 

California— $5.00 

Northern District, Individual, J. S. 

Kramer, 5 00 

Virginia— $1.00 

Southern District, Individual, Emma 
Southall 

Oregon— $5.00 

Individual, A. E. Troyer and wife, 



1 00 
5 00 



21 00 
153 32 



174 32 

150 00 
50 00 

10 00 

25 00 

12 50 



Total for the month, $ 

Previously reported, 

Total to date, $ 

INDIA SHARE PLAN 

Pennsylvania — $200.00 

Eastern District, Sunday-school, Fellow 
Helpers' Class (EHzabethtown), $.'00; Indi- 
viduals, Jas. Eshelman and Wife, $50, 

Middle District, Sunday-school, Clover 

Creek, 

Indiana— $10.00 

Southern District, Individual, Floyd Mc- 

Guire, 

Kansas — $25.00 

Northeastern District, Christian Work- 
er, Ottawa, 

Washington— $12.50 • 

Sunday-school, Soul Savers' Class (Out- 
look), 

West Virginia— $4.22 

Second District, Individuals, J. W. and 

Elva Heavener, 

Michigan— $12.50 

Sunday-school, Sunfield, 

Idaho— $50.00 

Individual, J. A. Bowers, 

Iowa— $12.50 

Southern District, Sunday-school, Os- 
ceola, ' 

North Dakota— $50.00 

Individual, Mary E. Weaver, 

Total for the month, 

Previously reported, 

Total to date, $ 785 25 

INDIA NATIVE WORKER 
Indiana— $50.00 

Northern District, Sunday-school, Guard- 
ian Class (North Winona) 20 00 

Southern District, Aid Society, Buck 

Creek, 30 00 

Wisconsin— $20.00 

Christian Workers, Chippewa Valley, .... 20 00 

Iowa — $80.00 

Sunday-school, Loyal Workers (Ivester), 80 00 

Mary land— $80 . 00 

Eastern District, Sunday-school, West- 
minster, 80 00 

Ohio— $40.00 

Northeastern District, Congregation, E. 

Nimishillen 40 00 

Pennsylvania— $80.00 

Eastern District, Sunday-school, Fellow 

Helpers (EHzabethtown) 80 00 

Missouri— $20.00 

Northern District, Individual, E. N. Huff- 
man, 20 00 



4 22 


12 50 


50 00 


12 50 


50 00 


£ 376 72 
408 53 



Total for the month, $ 592 16 



Total for the month, $ 370 00 

Previously .reported, 207 50 

Total to date $ 577 50 

DAHANU HOSPITAL 
Oklahoma— $4.50 

Congregation, Washita, . 4 50 



Annual Report 



93 



QUINTER MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 
Pennsylvania— $10.00 

Eastern District, Aid Society, White Oak, 



10 00 



Total for the month, $ 10 00 

Previously reported, 59 25 



Total to date, $ 



69 25 



OKLAHOMA MEMORIAL BOARDING SCHOOL 
Oklahoma— $147.26 

Individuals, John R. Pitzer, $16; J. F. 
Slifer, $50; O. D. Yoder, $81.26, 147 26 

INDIA WIDOWS' HOME 
California— $5.00 

Southern District, Aid Society, La Verne, 5 00 

South Dakota— $5.00 

Individual, Mrs. J. W. Kirkendall 5 00 



Total for the month, $ 10 00 

Previously reported, 55 00 

Total to date, $ 65 00 

INDIA FAMINE RELIEF 
Nebraska— $10.00 
Individual, A Sister, ' 10 00 

Virginia— $1.00 

Southern District, Emma Southall, 1 00 

Pennsylvania— $7.85 
Eastern District, Sunday-school, Denver, 7 85 



Total for the month, $ 18 85 

Previously reported, 2185 



Total to date, $ 

LIAO CHOU MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 
Indiana— $5.65 

Northern District, Sunday-school, Oak 



Grove, 
Iowa— $1,500.00 

Middle District, 
Rhodes, 



40 70 



5 65 



Individual, Franklin 



1,500 00 



Total for the month, $ 1,505 65 

Previously reported, 30 00 



Total to date, $ 1,535 65 

RHODES MEMORIAL FUND 
Iowa— $2,000.00 

Middle District, Individual. Franklin 
Rhodes, 2,000 00 

PING TING HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 
BUILDING 
Pennsylvania— $174.69 

Southeastern District, Aid Society, Co- 
ventry, 

Eastern District, Aid Societies, Harris- 
burg, $8.19; Aid Societies of Eastern Pa., 

$141.50 

California— $115.80 

Southern District, Aid Societies, Pasa- 
dena, $17.50; La Verne, $22.50; Santa Ana, 
$4; Inglewood, $6.30; Tropico, $2.50; South 
Los Angeles, $13, 

Northern District, Aid Societies of North- 
ern California 

Iowa— $69.30 

Middle District, Aid Societies, Panther, 
$5; Garrison, $5; Des Moines, $4.65; Panora, 
$7.50; Dallas Center, $10; Yale, $10; Brook- 
lyn, $9.65; Beaver Aid, $5, 

Southern District, Aid Societies, 

Michigan — $25.50 

Aid Societies, Woodland Village, $6; 
Grand Rapids, $4.25; Woodland, $10; Thorn- 
apple, $5.25, 

Virginia— $40.00 

Northern District, Aid Societies, Harris- 
onburg, $20; East Mill Creek, $20, 

Illinois— $114.75 

Southern District, Aid Societies, 

Nebraska— $5.00 

Aid Society, Afton, 5 00 



25 00 



149 69 



65 80 
50 00 



56 80 
12 50 



25 50 



40 00 



114 75 



Montana— $20.00 

Individuals, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Hecker, 20 00 

Oregon— $2.50 

Aid Society, Newberg, 2 50 

Idaho— $45.00 

Aid Societies, Weiser, $7.50; Aid Societies 
of Idaho, $37.50 45 00 

Total for the month, $ 612 54 

Previously reported 46109 



Total to date $ 1,173 63 

CHINA NATIVE WORKER 
Virginia— $21.00 

Eastern District, Home Department and 
Mothers' Class of East Falls Church Con- 
gregation, 21 00 

Iowa— $9.89 

Northern District, Sunday-school, Greene, 9 89 

Kansas — $15.20 

Northeastern District, Individuals, F. E. 
Poister and Wife, $7.60; J. A. Waters, $7.60, 15 20 

Oklahoma— $15.00 

Congregation, Washita, 15 00 

California— $70.00 

Northern District, Individuals, A Brother 
and Sister, Pasadena Cong., 20 00 

Southern District, Sunday-school, Ingle- 
wood, 50 00 

Indiana— $15.00 

Northern District, Individuals, Chas. 
Eaton and Wife, 15 00 

Total for the month, $ 146 09 

Previously reported 306 93 

Total to date, $ 453 02 

CHINA MISSIONS 
Maryland— $25.00 

Middle District, Individual, Receipt No. 

47646, 25 00 

Nebraska— $5.00 

Individual, A Sister, 5 00 

California— $5.00 

Northern District, Individual, J. S. Kra- 
mer 5 00 

Virginia — $1.00 

Southern District, Individual, Emma 
Southall, 1 00 



Total for the month, $ 

Previously reported, 

Total to date, $ 

CHINA GIRLS' SCHOOL 
Virginia— $4.90 

First District, Sunday-school, Pleasant 

View 

Nebraska— $5.00 

Individual, A Sister, 

Pennsylvania — $4.77 

Western District, Morrellville Sunday- 
school, 



36 00 
65 55 



101 55 



4 90 

5 00 



77 



Total for the month, $ 14 67 

Previously reported, 12 50 

Total to date, $ 27 17 

CHINA BOYS' SCHOOL 
Indiana— $11.00 

Southern District, Sunday-school, Pri- 
mary Department (Four Mile) 1100 

Virginia— $6.40 

First District, Sunday-school, Pleasant 
View (Chestnut Grove Cong.), 50 

Eastern District, Sunday-school, Junior 

Boys' Class. (Oakton), 5 90 

Ohio— $11.00 

Northeastern District, Individuals, Mas- 
ter Delmer S. (Deceased), $5; George Hart- 
sough, $6, 11 00 

Nebraska— $5.00 

Individual, A Sister, 5 00 



94 



Annual Report 



Oregon— $5.00 

Sunday-school, Evergreen, 5 00 

Pennsylvania— $5.00 

Western District, Sunday-school, Mor- 
rellville, 5 00 

Total for the month, $ 43 40 

Previously reported, 47 00 

Total to date, $ 90 40 

PING TING HOSPITAL 

Oklahoma— $3.50 

Congregation, Washita, . . 3 50 

Pennsylvania— $2.00 

Eastern District, Sunday-school, Begin- 
ners' Class (Lancaster) 2 00 

Nebraska— $5.00 

Individual, A Sister, 5 00 

Total for the month, $ 10 50 

Previously reported, 67 42 

Total to date, $ 77 92 

HOME MISSIONS 
Nebraska— $3.00 

Individual, Mrs. David Harvey, . 3 00 

Virginia— $2.50 

Southern District, Individual, Emma 
Southall 2 50 

Total for the month, $ 5 50 

Previously reported, 25 00 

Total to date, $ 30 50 

SWEDEN RELIEF 
Pennsylvania— $10.00 

Eastern District, Aid Society, White Oak, 10 00 

SWEDEN MISSION 
Virginia— $1.00 

Southern District, Individual, Emma 
Southall, 1 00 

DENMARK MISSION 
Virginia— $1.00 

Southern District, Individual, Emma 
Southall, 100 

STUDENT FELLOWSHIP FUND 
Indiana— $643.78 

Middle District, Manchester College Vol- 
unteer Band, 643 78 



RELIEF AND RECONSTRUCTION RE- 
PORT FOR APRIL, 1920 

ARMENIAN AND SYRIAN RELIEF 

Arizona . An „ n 

Phoenix Mission •..•••$ 40 00 

California 

Long Beach Cong., $33; J. J. Beckner, 

Ontario, $100, 133 00 

Colorado 

Rocky Ford Church, $10; J. E. Young, 
Colorado Springs, $25, 35 00 

Illinois - 

Oakley Church, $22.50; Cerro Gordo Ch., 
$45.65; Mt. Morris Church, $102.46; A Sister, 
Palestine, $10; Elgin Church, $14; Mr. and 
Mrs. Elmer Hirsh, Mansfield, $10; G. L. 
Wine, Polo, $2.50, 207 11 

Indiana 

Indianapolis Cong., $31.25; Tippecanoe 
Church, $23.18; Pipe Creek Church, $60; 
Cedar Lake Church, $15; Dorcas Class, •> 
Goshen City S. S., $25; West Branch S. 
S., Pine Creek District, $15; "In His 
Name," Logansport, $10; Manchester S. S., 
$316.25, Sisters' Aid Society, Walnut Ch., 

$25 , 52068 

Iowa 

Brother and Sister J. A. Troyer, Water- 



loo, $5; Cedar Cong., $75.45; Intermediate 

Class, Bagley, $5.45, 85 90 

Kansas 

Willing Workers' Class, Newton, $5.15; 
Clyde, Rose, and Fannie Seitz, Larned, $5; 
Sabetha Church, $375.73, 385 88 

Maryland 

Denton Church, $88.47; Sams Creek Ch., 
$50, 138 47 

Minnesota 

C. W. Society, Worthington, 5 00 

Montana 

Frank Kasten, Galpin Union S. S., 5 00 

Nebraska 

A Sister, Lincoln, 10 00 

New York 

Christian Endeavor Society, Brooklyn,.. 10 00 

North Carolina 

Brummetts Creek Missionary Society,.. 6 50 

Ohio 

Pleasant View Church, $38.11; Springfield 
Church, $5; Maple Grove Church, $130; 
Ashland (Dickey) Church, $15; John Spon- 

seller and Wife, Sherwood, $20, 208 11 

Pennsylvania 

Prices S. S., $12; Pleasant Hill S. S., 
Codorus Cong., $26.14; Fairview House of 
East Codorus Cong., $76.62; Windber Ch., 
$35.60; Koontz S. S., $15; Koontz Church, 
$65; Annville S. S., $15; Sister Alice Staney, 
Huntsdale, $5; Scalp Level Cong., $95.36; 
A Sister, Lancaster, $10; Big Dam S. S., 
Schuylkill Church, $9.50; East Petersburg 
S. S., $21.25; Stonetown S. S., Reading Ch., 
$7; Baumstown S. S., Reading Church, $6; 
Hanoverdale S. S., Big Swatara Church, 
$18; Fredericksburg Church, $61.80; Ranks- 
town S. S., Fredericksburg Church, $30.43; 
Annville Church, $288; Bareville S. S., 
Conestoga Church, $58.50; Tyrone Church, 
$105; Shippensburg S. S., $7; A Brother and 
Sister of Elizabethtown, $11.57; First Ch., 
Philadelphia, $669.73; Pittsburgh Church, 
$182.50; Stonerstown Cong., $3; Fairview S. 
S., $45; A Sister, Shippensburg, $18; Wa- 
terside Brethren S. S., $25.45; Parker Ford 
S. S., $25; Huntsdale Ch. of Upper Cum- 
berland Cong., $30; Sell St. Church, Johns- 
town, $34.50; Red Bank Church, $10.43; 
Palmyra S. S., Spring Creek Church, $443; 
Elizabethtown S. S., $163; Gleaners' Class, 
Akron S. S., $15; Mountville S. S., $48.08; 
Willing Workers' Class, Mountville S. S., 
$15; Mountville Church, $108.50; Newville 
S. S., Elizabethtown Church, $8.75; Berean 
Mission Band, Mechanic Grove Ch., $20; 
Waterford S. S., Ligonier Cong., $16; Rid- 

dlesburg Church, $5, 2,865 71 

Virginia 

Chestnut Grove Cong., .Pleasant View S. 
S., $31.65; L. N. Kinzie, Green Hill Cong., 
Salem, $37; Bridgewater Cong., $5; Brake 
S. S., North Mill Creek Cong., $7; Mrs. 
Frank Stultz, Doves ville, $1; Germantown 
Cong., $60; Jennie Lintecum, Hillsville, $1; 
Ella L. Myer, Fairfax, $12; Linville Creek 
S. S., $25; Linville Creek Aid Society, $25, 204 65 
Washington 

Junior Class of No. Spokane Ch., $3.75; 
Seattle Cong., $15.95; Forest Center S. S., 

$20, 3970 

Wyoming 

Annetta Yarger, Sheridan, 8 00 

Unknown, 

Total for month of April, $ 4,908 91 

FRENCH ORPHAN RELIEF FOR APRIL, 1920 

Pennsylvania 

Huntingdon S. S., $36.50; A Sister, Lan- 
caster, $5, $ 4150 



Total for month of April, ............. ...^ 41 5Q 



Annual Report 95 

SERBIAN RELIEF FOR APRIL, 1920 JEWISH RELIEF FOR APRIL, 1920 

Pennsylvania Pennsylvania 

A Sister, Lancaster, 5 00 A Sister, Lancaster, 5 00 



Total for month of April, $ 5 00 Total for month of April, $ 5 00 

Gish Publishing Fund 

(Continued from Page 90) 

Previouslyl Sent out I Total to 
sent out |during 1919 1 date 

Call of a World Task, 320 320 

Character of Jesus (Bushnell), 927 .... 927 

Character of Jesus (Jefferson), 324 324 

Christ We Forget, The, 388 189 577 

Contagion of Character, 793 793 

Cruden's Concordance, 2,358 92 2,450 

Doctrine of the Brethren Defended, 1,791 88 1,879 

Doctrine of Prayer, 568 568 

Divinity of Christ, 3,000 .... 3,000 

Eternal Verities, 2,773 58 2,831 

Expository Preaching 615 615 

Gospel for a World of Sin, 251 283 534 

How to Master the Bible, 1,734 1 1,735 

History of the Brethren, 1,547 1,547 

History of Preaching, Vol. I, 600 .... 600 

History of Preaching, Vol. II, 380 .... 380 

Life of John Kline, 1,145 .... 1,145 

Life of Christ, 2 Vols. (Edersheim), 1,892 83 1,975 

Life of St. Paul, 671 99 770 

Lord's Supper, 3,415 3,415 

Little Talks to Little People, 386 207 593 

Man and His Money, A, 780 12 792 

Manhood of the Master, 366 180 546 

Man's Value to Society, 608 1 609 

Minister as Shepherd, 254 332 586 

Modern Secret Societies, 2,741 70 2,811 

Our Troublesome Religious Questions, 519 55 574 

Pastoral and Personal Evangelism, 750 750 

Pedagogy for Ministers, 349 349 

Preacher and His Models 550 .... 550 

Preparation and Delivery of Sermons, 782 126 908 

Problems of the Old Testament, 700 .... 700 

Problems of Pulpit and Platform, '. 1,717 90 1,807 

Quiet Talks on Following the Christ 547 547 

Quiet Talks on John's Gospel 549 .... 549 

Quiet Talks about the Tempter, 529 61 590 

Quiet Talks with World Winners, 350 350 

Resurrection of Christ, 1,000 1,000 

Roman Catholicism Capitulating, etc., 789 789 

Seven Churches of Asia, 1,420 80 1,500 

Sick, Dying and Dead, 2,109 103 2,212 

Square Talk about the Inspiration of the Bible, 2,485 2,485 

Sunday School Commentary, 8,937 8,937 

Schaff's History of the Church, Vol. 1 878 .... 878 

Schaff's History of the Church, Vol. II, 701 .... 701 



96 Annual Report 

Previouslyl Sent out 
sent out |during 1919 1 

Schaff's History of the Church, Vol. Ill, 549 

Schaff's History of the Church, Vol. IV, 510 

Schaff's History of the Church, Vol. V, Pt. I, 540 

Schaff's History of the Church, Vol. V, Pt. II, 231 147 

Schaff's History of the Church, Vol. VI, 618 .... 

Schaff's History of the Church, Vol. VII, 559 41 

Teacher Training with the Master Teacher, 1,609 

Things to Live For, 599 

Thirty-three Years of Missions, 539 15 

The Twelve Apostles, : 2,099 83 

Training the Twelve, " 339 

Nave's Topical Bible, ./ 688 

Topical Text Book, 1,963 

Trine Immersion, 2,786 

Universalism, 1,609 

War vs. Peace, 950 

When Home Is Heaven, 400 208 

Young Preachers, 1,959 

Pamphlets on International Peace, 3,100 

Totals 94,619 5,637 

Home Study Course Books 

Origin and Teaching of New Testament Books, 19 

Records and Letters of the Apostolic Age, 1 

The Church School, 15 

The Making of a Sermon, 16 

The Old Testament and Its Contents, 19 

The Message of the Prophets, > 2 

The Ideal Ministry, 2 

w. 

Totals, 74 



Total to 
date 

549 

510 

540 

378 

618 

600 

1,609 

599 

554 

2,182 

339 

688 

1,963 

2,786 

1,609 

950 

608 

1,959 

3,100 

100,256 



: Y0UR OP PORTUNITY 

To take a trip through our China Mission Fields — by securing 

| China— A Challenge to the Church 

Edited by Isaiah E. Oberholtzer, Norman A. Seese, Walter J. Heisey 

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for funds — will want to know and see. 115 pages covering 14 distinct 
phases of the work. Sent postpaid, 50c. 



Also make a similar trip through Our India Mission by reading 

A Year with Our Missionaries 

in India 

The Year's Report concealed in Story Form 

Written by W. B. Stover, Pioneer Missionary to India 

William Weston and his good wife Mary take a trip from Penn- 
sylvania to visit the India Mission. What they see at the different 
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cidentally they give us the facts for the year's work. The story car- 
ries the interest throughout. Sent postpaid, 15c. 

COMBINATION OFFER NO. I 

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Missionary Programs, 35 



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These four items will be sent postpaid upon receipt of $1.00 

Address these orders to 
GENERAL MISSION BOARD, Elgin, 111. 



BRIDGEWATER COLLEGE LIBRARY 



^^iijimiiiiiiiiiiiiiii" i iiiimiii mm iiiiiii mil tunim iiiunii iiimSS^ 






:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiin 



3 w 



■ 



Is It a 

Square Deal? 

Your boy decided to enter the ministry; and spends his 
hard earned savings for an education so that he may be 
best fitted to give his whole time to the Church as a Min- 
ister or Missionary. 

My son decides to invest his savings in a farm or busi- 
ness and make money. He does so and makes much 
money, and is prosperous. 

Your son comes on a bare support and ministers to the 
spiritual needs of my son. 

They grow old together. One grows wealthy; the 
other has none of this world's goods. 

Is it fair that my son should grow spiritually through 
the efforts of your son, and my son provide nothing for 
the old age of your self-sacrificing son? 

Certainly Not 

Those that minister have a right to expect the Church 
to whom they minister to provide a living for them when 
they are old. 

We are sharers in the spiritual bread which they break 
to us. Therefore we are party to their need and want in 
old age. 

Our Prosperity can Provide for Them. 

The Annuity Plan of the General Mission Board is Open 
for Endowment for the Superannuated Minister and Mis- 
sionary. 

Why not invest endowment funds for this purpose so 
that in days to come those who have grown old adminis- 
tering the income from world-wide endowment funds may 
not have need and want themselves? 

Write us today. Let us make wise provision for our 
Ministers. Then shall young men be attracted more eas- 
ily to the work of Spiritual Ministration. 

WRITE US, 

GENERAL MISSION BOARD 

Elgin, Illinois 



^T^ iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



THE MISSIONARY 




Churcti^pf the 'Brethren 



IHlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllll 



li!!liili!il!!!llllliri 



/:illlllllll!llllllllllllilll!!!lllllliil!ll!!!lllll 




Members of the General Mission Board and Its 

Secretary § 

Left to right: Otho Winger, Vice Chairman; D. L. Miller, Life Advisory | 

Member; H. C. Early, Chairman; Chas. D. Bonsack, A. P. Blough, J.J. Yoder, 1 

and J. H. B. Williams, Secretary. 1 

iuniiiii 



Vol. XXII 



111 



JULY, 1920 

■■■■■■■■ 



No. 7 



The Missionary Visitor 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN 
THROUGH HER GENERAL MISSION BOARD 



Subscription Terms 



THE SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IS ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR 

The subscription price is included in EACH donation of two dollars or more to the Gen- 
eral Mission Board, either direct or through any congregational collection, provided the 
two dollars or more are given by one individual and in no way combined with another's gift. 
Different members of the same family may each give two dollars or more, and extra sub- 
scriptions, thus secured, may upon request be sent ta persons who they know will be in- 
terested in reading the Visitor. 

Kindly notice, however, that these subscription terms do not include a subscription for 
every two dollar donation, but a subscription for each donation of two dollars or more, no 
matter how large the donation. 

Ministers. In consideration of ther services to the church, influence in assisting the 
Committee to raise missionary money, and upon their request annually, the Visitor will 
be sent to ministers of the Church of the Brethren. 

Foreign postage, 15 cents additional to all foreign countries, including Canada. Sub- 
scriptions discontinued at expiration of time. 

To insure delivery of paper, prompt notice of change of address should be given. When 
asking change of address give old address as well as new. Please order paper each year 
if possible under the same name as in the previous year. 

Address all communications regarding subscriptions and make remittances payable to 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, ILLINOIS 

Entered as second class matter at the postoffice of Elgin, Illinois. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, Act of 
October 3, 1917, authorized Aug. 20, 1918. 



Contents for July, 1920 

EDITORIALS, 161 

ESSAYS— 

The Volunteers at Sedalia, By John M. Roller, 165 

Monday Morning Volunteer Meeting, By Ezra Wenger, 169 

En Route to China, By D. L. Horning, M. D., 169 

My First Year at Jalalpor, By Lillian Grisso, 171 

Vada, By H. P. and Kathryn Garner, 172 

A Retrospect, By Nettie M. Senger, 174 

Our First Week's Experiences in Language School, By Sara Zigler 

Myers, 175 

Side Lines to Language Study, By M. M. Myers 176 

Twenty-one Months in India, By Anctta C. Mow, 177 

China Notes for March, By Anna Hutchison, 178 

India Notes for March, By Anetta C. Mow, 181 

April India Notes, 182 

Opportunities for Work Among Girls of the Depressed Classes, By 

Sadie J. Miller, 183 

Opportunities for Work Among the Women of the Depressed Classes, 

By Kathryn Ziegler, 184 

the junior missionary- 
Two Adventures, Part One, By Kathren Royer Holsopple, 186 

The Magic Lock, By Minnie F. Bright, 187 

Ruth, Our India Girl, By Josephine Powell, 188 

FINANCIAL REPORT, 190 



Volume XXII 



JULY, 1920 



No. 7 



EDITORIALS 

Notes From Sedalia 



" Prayer Releases Power " blazed forth 
by night from a large sign at Sedalia, and 
the large crowd at our recent Conference 
seemed in some measure to sense the mean- 
ing of these words. Whatever may have 
been our opinions on various measures be- 
fore the Conference, most folks came to 
Sedalia realizing that many of the queries, 
which would be considered would be of vital 
interest to the future of our church. Folks 
felt the need of prayer. This Conference 
had surely been prayed for before coming 
to Sedalia, else things would not have gone 
so smoothly as they did. As it is we came 
away happy, not because anyone had had 
his own way all through, but because there 
was a consciousness that the decisions made 
were through the leadership of the Spirit. 



We have quickly formed the habit of 
being at Annual Meeting in time for the 
opening session of the Life Work Confer- 
ence, on Wednesday evening. Through 
force of circumstances the service this year 
developed into an impromptu consecration 
period. We believe that this should be the 
order of service for the opening Wednes- 
day evening each year. Such a period 
sets the standard for the whole inspirational 
portion of our Conference, and often has 
its effect upon the business sessions. Prob- 
ably at least one thousand people were pres- 
ent for the Wednesday evening meeting. 



The first two days were" devoted to a 
combination Bible-Evangelistic-Life- Work 
Conference. The speakers were well chosen 
for all their topics. Folks caught a new 
appreciation of the Blessed Book, were filled 
with interest for a year of evangelism, and 
were brought face to face with the question 
of a whole life devoted to the work of the 
Master. 



Likely these days reached a climax with 
the address of Bro. C. C. Ellis, of Juniata 
College, when the members of the audience 
were given an opportunity to dedicate them- 
selves anew to the service of the Lord. Such 
a splendid number as came forward was 
some index to the missionary and devotional 
spirit of the Life Work Conference. How 
blessed it is to see such willing surrender of 
life; how full of possibilities such dedica- 
tion is for the success of the church; how 
indicative of a glorious future for our 
church the devotion of these young lives 
foretokens! 

Saturday forenoon was given over to a 
consideration of our Forward Movement. 
The addresses, so carefully prepared, em- 
phasized anew the possibilities of this great 
Movement for good, while the interest of 
the congregation showed that folks have 
not tired of this vast enterprise. A spirit 
of denominational loyalty has been gener- 
ated during the past year, which is most 
commendable. We believe that our young 
people are more enthusiastic regarding the 
future of the church than they have been 
in years past, while the older ones catch 
the spirit and the importance of " lengthen- 
ing the cords and strengthening the stakes." 

There may be a danger in our enthusiasm 
for the Forward Movement, but we hope 
not. As we discover our ability to raise 
sums of money, and our capacity for push- 
ing the cause, two dangers confront us. 
First, we may place too much reliance upon 
our ability, to the neglect of seeking the 
guidance of the Spirit; and second, we 
may be inclined to think our own little 
denominational work is quite sufficient. 
Either of these is an error. Let us so care- 
fully guide our impulses and direct our 



162 



The Missionary Visitor 



July 

1920 



energies that we may be constantly at the 
foot of the altar and inquiring our ways of 
God. 



The address of Bro. Early, on Sunday, on 
" The Future Outlook of the Church " was 
most significant in the vision that it gave 
us. How careful, how prayerful, how 
vigilant, how circumspect, how Spirit-filled 
we must be in these days, that the future 
success of the church be not blighted or 
impaired! 

It pleases us to note that the great ques- 
tion of Christian education is being ac- 
corded its rightful place in our church ac- 
tivities. It seems to us that this was done 
this year with more than ordinary willing- 
ness, and we thank God for it. Our mis- 
sionaries, our ministers, our workers must 
be prepared. The only place that they can 
secure the preparation we wish them to 
have is in our own church schools. One 
of the most painful experiences in choosing 
workers for Christian service is that of 
rejecting an honest and willing and conse- 
crated heart because of a lack of prepara- 
tion. If every member of the Church of 
the Brethren could be confronted with this 
problem but once and be led to consider 
it in all its phases, he would be converted 
instantly to the cause of our schools. Let 
us help to make them the fountains of 
preparation that the church must have. 



On Sunday evening we enjoyed two 
splendid addresses on " The Kingdom of 
God." " The only fortress that has ever 
been taken is the City of God," so we heard 
a learned man say last winter. Thank 
God for its stability! We love to think of 
this kingdom, of its growth, of its future, 
of its glories. The church suffers from an 
absence of the contemplative; its tasks 
become so serious that folks fail to " think 
of the home over there." No wonder that 
in this rushing age the kingdom of God 
becomes remote and unreal to so many. 

But no interpretation of this kingdom 
would please everybody, much as these 
splendid addresses pleased the writer. We 
could not expect any vision of the future to 
please all. It would be most remarkable, 



approaching the impossible, for us to. under- 
stand a kingdom regarding which we know 
so little, and yet so much, and for all of us 
to interpret it in the same manner. Possibly 
those who look at it from the South would 
get a different picture from those who view 
it from the West or the North or 'the East. 
The comforting thought about it is that 
there is such a kingdom. And another com- 
forting thought is that it is far more im- 
portant to work while it is day than fully 
to comprehend the sixes and sevens and 
sixty-sixes of the great divine structure. 
The great Church of the Brethren can 
never be divided horizontally by any two 
interpretations of Scripture about a king- 
dom, the details of which are to be re- 
vealed only when we meet him face to face, 
if the great majority of that church sets 
its face along the path of service rather 
than to the mazes of speculation. The 
marching orders of our Great King are to 
advance to the relief of enthralled peoples, 
and to carry the light to those who sit in 
great darkness. 

The activities of the Student Volunteers 
at Conference centered on their Monday 
morning program. This service was en- 
riched by the appearance of Bro. Wilbur B. 
Stover, who reached Conference on Sunday 
afternoon. When a church can have an in- 
creasing number of young people who have 
dedicated themselves to the service of Jesus 
Christ, as our church has, there is a future 
pregnant with possibilities. Oh, that the 
youthful fire and enthusiasm and willing 
abandon of these young lives may temper^ 
every heart in the church! 



Monday afternoon is always a climax at. 
Conference, and this year was no exception. 
The strong addresses of Brethren W. S. 
Long and J. M. Blough focussed our at- 
tention upon the supreme business of the 
church. The offering, which has been in 
the gathering for several months, was cast 
into the treasury, showing that up to the 
present time more than $650,000 has been 
given or pledged to the great One Million 
Dollar fund. There were ten who dedicated 
their lives to the service of our King on 
foreign soil. The great missionary service 
flag, as shown first at Winona Lake last 



July 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



163 



year, hung over the platform during this 
service, and at the conclusion of this great 
missionary program was lowered and 
crosses were attached for those who go 
out to the fields for a life of service. 



Those appointed are as follows: For 
India, Bro. Lynn A. and Mary Brubaker 
Blickenstaff, of La Verne, Calif.; Sisters 
Ina Marshburn Kaylor, La Verne, Calif., 
(newly-wedded wife of Bro. John I. Kay- 
lor), and Pearl Blanche Kingery, of North 
Manchester, Ind. For China, Bro. W. Har- 
lan and Sister Frances Shelter Smith, 
Grundy county congregation, Iowa, and 
Sister Mary Cline, of Weyers Cave, Va.; 
as native pastor to South China, Bro. Moy 
Gwong. As native pastor to Denmark, 
Brother Neils and Sister Christena Esben- 
sen. All of these workers plan to sail dur- 
ing the summer, excepting Sister Kaylor, 
who with her husband will remain in the 
homeland during the coming winter for ad- 
ditional preparation. The biographies of 
all these will appear in the Visitor in due 
time. 



It will be seen from the foregoing that 
our native brethren who return to their 
home in South China are to be pastored. 
Such a work has been in contemplation for 
some time, due much to the insistence of 
these native brethren, who, having tasted 
of the Living Bread, desire it to be carried 
to their loved ones. Bro. Gwong goes with 
splendid spiritual and intellectual equip- 
ment to serve in this important field. The 
church should fervently remember him in 
its prayers. 



It is significant for good that we can re- 
turn a pastor to Denmark to assist Bro. 
Glasmire. One of our handicaps in Scan- 
dinavia always has been a lack of trained 
workers and an absence of strong young 
men. Brethren Graybill and Glasmire are 
praying that this weakness in their work 
may be overcome, and we believe that 
Brother and Sister Esbensen will find a 
great door and effectual opened unto them. 

When shall Africa be opened for mission 
work? This question is in the keeping of 



the Spirit. When it shall be opened, where 
we shall bore in (as Dan Crawford says), 
and who shall be numbered in the first 
party are secrets of the Father. Regarding 
these questions we ask the church to pray 
with us for careful direction. There are 
great unoccupied fields on the Dark Conti- 
nent; there are peoples there almost without 
number who need to be led to Jesus Christ. 
We have the light, we have the witnesses 
to bear the message, we have the resources; 
may God combine these into a mighty 
force that will carry Christ into the heart 
of Africa. 



There is an increasing interest in home 
mission work, thanks to the efforts of the 
committee from the District Mission Boards 
and our new Home Mission Secretary, Bro. 
M. R. Zigler. Various meetings were held 
at Conference to consider this subject, and 
with each additional meeting a new interest 
was shown in, and a new need felt for, more 
intensive work in the homeland. Not that 
this need has grown suddenly so much 
greater, but we have awakened rapidly to 
what has required attention all these years. 
We repeat, what we have said so many 
times before, that we can be prospered 
abroad only as we do our tasks well in the 
homeland. 



Did you visit the exhibit rooms at Con- 
ference? We never had so splendid a place, 
nor so general an exhibit as this year. There 
was room for all, and to spare. Brethren 
James M. Mohler and H. Spenser Minnich, 
who had this in charge, had spent much 
time and study on this question, and the 
exhibit showed the results of their efforts. 
It is well for us to become acquainted with 
what our neighbors are doing. It is of 
value to see the articles from foreign fields 
that go towards making up the lives of the 
millions who live over there. We count 
upon the exhibit, year by year, to give us 
needed instruction in these things, and this 
year was doubtless our best thus far. 



Well, we must stop. We cannot say 
everything. Every program had its own 
missionary appeal. Every decision had its 
own influence upon the work of the church. 



164 



The Missionary Visitor 



July 

1920 



Every word spoken shed some influence 
upon the progress of the kingdom, and it 
is the task of furthering that progress to 
which we have dedicated our lives. 

Conference warmly welcomed the return 
on furlough of many missionaries, a num- 
ber of whom we were privileged to meet at 
Sedalia: Brother and Sister Wilbur B. 
Stover, Brother and Sister J. M. Blough, 
Bro. Jesse B. Emmert, Bro. John I. Kaylor, 
Sisters B. Mary Royer, Goldie M. Swartz 
and Olive Widdowson — all from India; 
Brother and Sister Ernest Vaniman and 
Anna V. Blough from China, and Sister 
Ida Buckingham from Sweden. Sisters 
Gertrude Emmert and Florence Pittenger, 
with their families, were not present, nor 
was Sister Anna M. Eby, who is bravely 
caring for an invalid father. It was too 
bad that Dr. and Sister O. G. Brubaker and 
Sister Emma Horning, and Drs. A. Ray- 
mond and Laura M. Cottrell, who are on 
their way home, could not reach here in 
time for Conference. We are glad that all 
of them can have a period of rest in the 
homeland. 

Now our Conference is over. We look 
back upon it with fond memories. We can- 
not close these notes without voicing ap- 
preciation for the Committee of Arrange- 
ments, who worked so tirelessly. And we 
must express our appreciation for the Se- 
dalia Chamber of Commerce and the citi- 
zens of the town. All did their best to make 
our stay enjoyable. They spared no pains 
to give us their best. We join with our 
committee of arrangements in saying that 
no city ever outdid Sedalia in extending a 
welcome and in providing freely and well 
the best that it had for our enjoyment. We 
were recipients of true hospitality and we 
thank you, Sedalia. 

But, we hear some pessimistic brother 
asking, were there no discouraging factors 
present at Sedalia? Surely there were, but 



we did not sit down to write of these. We 
do not suppose that folks want to hear of 
them, and we feel certain that, if they do, 
it is evidence that they should not be thus 
disconcerted. Where encouragement thrives, 
discouragement always hovers around. But 
who cares to spend his time looking at the 
reverse side of a splendid tapestry? There 
were sufficient things of vital import that 
happened at Sedalia, showing that the body 
of the church is sound, and the decisions as 
made were so plainly evident as decisions 
of the Spirit and of the majority that we 
should tfrank God and take courage. The 
future is bright for the child of God. It 
promises much for the Church of the Breth- 
ren. We must have a mind to work, a will 
to do, a spirit of unity, and an unwavering 
trust in God. Spend your time, my good 
brother, in recounting the advantages in 
every decision that was made, regardless of 
how it was reached. You will come nearer 
finding satisfaction and contentment along 
that road than any other which we know. 

And now the editor of the Visitor is lay- 
ing down his pen for a season and will bid 
the readers farewell. The path of duty 
seems to lie in the direction of visiting 
our missionaries on the fields. With Bro. 
J. J. Yoder we expect to sail July 26 for 
China. We hope to reach there in time for 
the China Annual Meeting; then to Japan 
to the World Sunday School Convention; 
thence to India in time for Christmas. From 
India we hope to visit some sections of East 
Africa, looking towards the stablishment of 
a mission of the Church of the Brethren on 
the Dark Continent. Thence we hope to 
reach Scandinavia, and from there to look 
the Statue of Liberty in the face and greet 
our loved ones. Brethren H. J. Harnly, 
of McPherson, Kans., and David Betts, of 
Nampa, Idaho, will accompany us, at their 
own expense. We ask the prayers of the 
church, that we may be able fully to meet 
the requirements of the Spirit in this most 
important journey. 



July 

1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



165 



The Volunteers at Sedalia 



John M. Roller 



THE Sedalia Conference has passed 
into history. Very prominent among 
its events are the activities of the 
Student Volunteers. Not as many Volun- 
teers were present as in our last Conference, 
but they were very active. During the Life 
Work Conference, which met the first two 
days, many were inspired and some found 
more definitely their life's work. 

During the Conference the Volunteers 
were engaged in several important activities. 
Under their supervision early morning 
prayer meetings were conducted. Promi- 
nent men of the Brotherhood were chosen 
as leaders, and the sessions of the meeting 
were prayed for each morning. 

On Sunday the Volunteers themselves 
held a consecration service. This was' led 
by Bro.- J. M. Blough, of India. Two things 
were here emphasized: the joy and peace 
which come by complete surrender, and 
then the havoc which tampering with just 
a little sin may cause. 

The business meeting of the Volunteers 
this year will be long remembered. After 
the transaction of the business in hand 
addresses were made by members of the 
General Mission Board who were present. 
President Statler, of Juniata, not being 
present, Vice-President Moomaw, of Man- 
chester, called the meeting. 

The following officers were elected for 
the coming year. 

President, A. D. Helser, of Ohio 

Vice-President, 

Geo. Griffith, of Pennsylvania 

Secretary-Treasurer, ; 

Anna F. Flory, of Virginia 

Educational Secretary, 

Miles Blickenstaff, of Kansas 

Traveling Secretary, 

rC. H. Shamberger, of Idaho 

An amendment to the constitution was 
considered, regarding the mailing address 
of Volunteers out of the schools which will 
be presented to the bands by the traveling 
secretary. The following resolution was 



passed and given to the General Boards 
and to the Standing Committee: 

To the General Boards of the Church of the 
Brethren 

"The United Volunteer Movement, rep- 
resenting 450 young people who have ded- 
icated their whole lives to the service of 
our Lord, through our church resolve: 

" 1. We heartily commend the general 
boards of our great church for their vision 
in cooperating in the world endeavor to 
lift up Christ. 

" 2. We urge the continuation of said 
relationship as it will give our church an 
opportunity to propagate the ' great doc- 
trines that have lifted us as a church. 

"3. That through the faith in Jesus Christ 
and love for our mother church we pledge 
our last full measure of consecration to this 
work, which will enlarge the Christian 
church in America and hasten 'the spread 
of its saving Gospel in the non-Christian 
lands of the world." 

Passed unanimously by the Student Vol- 
unteers, assembled in Sedalia, Mo., 1920. 

Bro. Early, in his remarks, mentioned the 
fact that in the financial drive put on by 
the bands in their schools, the $21,000, which 
was raised by the students and faculty, 
was more than Annual Meeting offering 
at Winona four years ago. 

Bro. Williams called attention to the fact 
that fewer were going to the field this year 
than last, but said there were good reasons, 
and that he was not disappointed with the 
Volunteers' work. 

Bro. Yoder also spoke concerning the 
interest which the Board had in the Vol- 
unteers and of what it expected of them. 

RESOLUTIONS 
Professional 

The business and professional group con- 
ference of the Life Work Conference pro- 
gram at the Annual Convention of the 
Church of the Brethren, convened at Se- 
dalia, Mo., June 10, 1920, unanimously pre- 
sents a resolution of appreciation to the pro- 
gram committee for recognizing the Chris- 



166 



The Missionary Visitor 



July 
1920 



tian business laymen and laywomen of our 
denomination and for according them, for 
the first time in the history of our Annual 
Conferences, a place on the program. 

This same group ventures the hope that 
a precedent has thus been established which 
will perpetuate in future Conferences, for 
the spiritual growth and development of 
our Christian business men and women and 
for the enlistment of their whole-hearted 
cooperation in every good work of our 
church. 

Committee, 

John Heckman, 
Ray H. Flory, 
Ralph W. Miller. 

Medical Section 
The medical section of the Life Work 
Conference at Sedalia, Mo., passed the fol- 
lowing resolution: 

"In view of the importance of the sub- 
ject, and the close relationship of medicine 
to the mission interests of our church, and 
because of the interest manifested in this, 
the first medical sectional conference, we 
ask that similar conferences of this nature 
be held at future Conferences." 

Educational Section 

The educational section of the Life Work 
Conference of the Church of the Brethren, 
assembled at Sedalia, Mo., passed unani- 
mously a resolution, that — 

" First, Resolved, That we commend the 
action of our general church boards in 
organizing our new Forward Movement. 

" Second, That we pledge our life serv- 
ice . to our beloved church in this great 
movement." 

PUBLIC MEETING OF STUDENT 
VOLUNTEERS 

[The following was published in a Sedalia (Mo.) 
daily paper concerning the meeting on Sunday, at 
6 P. M., during the Conference.] 

This meeting was well attended b> vol- 
unteers and many other interested people. 
The 'program consisted of several songs 
by the audience, four speakers, and an il- 
lustrated pageant. 

Miss Fannie Bucher, of Mount Morris, 
spoke on " The Force? That Call Us Forth " 



She spoke of existing conditions in Argen- 
tina, Russia, China/ India and Africa. 

In Argentina they are eager for Chris- 
tianity. Africa is on the brink of indecision. 
The key to the situation is an all-around 
education of the head, hand and heart. This 
alone will insure the permanency of our 
work in the mission field. 

Ruth Forney, of Bethany, spoke on " The 
Unfinished Task." She said that the two 
great evils which menace our youths and 
maidens are crimes against childhood, and 
the congested quarters of our large cities 
where the foreigner lives. Education minus 
Christianity will only produce Germanic 
conditions in America. 

Leland Brubaker, of La Verne, talked on 
" The Real Act of Living." He gave three 
planes: The beast or selfish plane; the local 
or narrow-minded plane, and the God- 
planned plane which gives large problems 
and large opportunities. 

Moy Gwong, of North Manchester, spoke 
on " The Call of China," this being his na- 
tive land. He told of their needs, both so- 
cially and religiously. He lamented the fact 
that Americans are bringing in such vices 
as the cigarette and liquor, which are a 
direct enemy to Christianity. 

The McPherson Band then gave their 
pageant. One represented a doctor with a 
diploma and a sign which he did not know 
where to hang because there were so many 
doctors around. Then came the volunteers 
representing China, Japan, Africa, and 
Korea, who invited him to hang his sign 
in their countries. But he could take only 
one, so the challenge lies open to take the 
others. Will you go? 



Pray and Prepare for the 

year of 

Special Evangelism 

to begin in 

September 



July 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



167 




Volunteers Who Go to India 

Left to right: Blanche Pearl Kingery, Ina (Marshburn) Kaylor, 
Lynn A. Blickenstaff and Mary (Brubaker) Blickenstaff. The two 
boys are Leonard and David Blickenstaff. 




Volunteers Who Go to China 

Left to right: Moy Gwong, Native Pastor to South China, Mary 
E. Cline, Frances Sheller Smith and W. Harlan Smith. 



168 



The Missionary Visitor 



1920 
July 





Furloughed Missionaries at the 
Sedalia Conference 

Left to right, back row: J. M. 
Blough, Mrs. J. M. Blough, Olive 
Widdowson, B. Mary Royer, J. B. 
Emmert, Goldie Swart z, Ina 
(Marshburn) Kaylor, Mary Stover, 
W. B. Stover, J. I. .Kaylor. 

Ernest Vaniman and wife Susie 
are on front row with their three 
children, Delbert, Edna and Carol. 




Volunteers Who Go as Native Pas- 
tors to Denmark 

Christena Esbensen 
Neils Esbensen 



July 

1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



169 



Monday Morning Volunteer Meeting 



Ezra Wenger 



THIS was the regular public confer- 
ence meeting and was held in the 
main auditorium. After Brother J. H. 
B. Williams had opened the meeting, Broth- 
er Wilbur B. Stover, who has just returned 
from India, spoke of the varied experiences 
of the missionary. In speaking on the sub- 
ject, " Consecration," he said that a native 
of India who had become a Christian said he 
would be willing to be a martyr to the faith, 
but he objected to continual persecution, but 
Brother Stover said that the missionary 
must necessarily be willing to stand the 
test and strain of everyday life. 

Brother Fred Replogle, of Manchester 
College, gave a short talk on the " Prayer 
Life of the Volunteer," in which he said 
the volunteers do have their problems which 
are oftentimes perplexing, but because of 
their optimism and cheerful attitude, such 
problems are kept in the background. Their 
ability to do this is to be accounted for 
largely because of their nearness to God 
in prayer. 

Brother Moy Gwong, who is soon to sail 
for South China, to serve as a native pastor 
there, emphasized three things. First: 
Giving up the things which hinder us from 
getting close to Christ in working for him. 
Second: Making Christ supreme in our 
lives. Third: Working now; not waiting 
until some future time when it may suit us 
better. 



Brother H. C. Early, who is chairman of 
the General Mission Board, brought us 
a splendid message about the true function 
of the church. He emphasized the propa- 
gation of the Christian faith. Brother A. D. 
Helser, who has been attending Bethany 
during the past year, spoke on the subject, 
" Doing Business for the King." In his 
characteristic way, known to all of the 
volunteers, he drew our attention towards 
Christ, whom we are under obligation to 
serve. He said that doing business for the 
King is not play, but is hard work, and re- 
quires strong spiritual men and women to 
accomplish it. The greatest tragedy of the 
world is a wasted life, and can only be pre- 
vented by having the Guide all along the 
way. 

We dare not be bound by small, petty 
sins because as long as we are bound we 
cannot hope to free others. We must be 
aware that a Pentecost will come only as 
we pass through a Gethsemane. The great 
testing time is now on. We dare not trust 
our feelings or else we will fail when the . 
acid test is applied. Our attitude and our 
service now will prove our worth to the 
kingdom. We are required to give only a 
reasonable service, Rom. 12: 1. God is 
honest with us, and we must be honest with 
him. , 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



En Route to China 



D. L. Horning, M. D. 



DECEMBER 27, after completing 
arrangements for traveling, we set 
sail on the good ship China, waving 
farewell to our friends on the pier. It was 
our first experience on a seagoing vessel, 
and as she pulled away from the shore and 
land began to fade from our sight, a feeling 
of loneliness and the reality of the job ahead 
crept over us. The sea was calm at first, but 
farther out became quite rolling and oc- 
casionally a feeling of seasickness would 
creep over some of our party, as day after 



day we sailed on with nothing but water 
all around and sky and clouds above. 

Sundays we enjoyed services, which were 
fairly well attended by the passengers. 
Weekdays, when we were not in our cabins 
or at meals, we spent our time on deck, 
walking, reading, playing deck games or 
just sitting in our deck chairs watching the 
beautiful, restless, rolling waves so blue 
that the sky was hardly a comparison. As 
we neared Honolulu we saw many flying 
fish. They appeared to be about the size 



170 



The Missionary Visitor 



July 
1920 



of a mountain trout and would dart out 
of the water near the boat, skim grace- 
fully over the surface and disappear in 
the sloping side of a distant wave. They 
told us these fish were very good to eat, 
and that during severe storms they fre- 
quently flew up on deck. 

After one week of uneventful sailing our 
boat anchored at Honolulu, the capital city 
of the Hawaiian Islands, a very beautiful 
spot where nearly every kind of tropical 
plant, tree and fruit greets one's eyes. The 
islands have mountain ranges which, most 
of the time, are covered with clouds or 
washed by torrents of rain. As we had 
several hours on shore we took an auto 
and went five miles back in the mountains 
whence we enjoyed a most beautiful pano- 
ramic view of the opposite side of the island. 
Returning we visited the famous Wikiki 
Beach, the aquarium, and the Punch Bowl, 
an extinct volcanic crater, which at some 
time poured out the lava beds on which 
the city is built. In the evening, as our boat 
left the pier, Hawaiian boys swam along- 
side and gracefully dived for coins which 
the passengers tossed into the water, many 
of them swimming back to the shore with 
their cheeks bulging with the coins they had 
caught. 

Nine days out from Honolulu a severe 
storm arose. The wind was blowing a 
terrible gale and our boat was headed right 
into the storm. The waves grew very 
large and looked like snow-capped hills 
and yawning valleys, into the depths of 
which one moment we would plunge and 
the next would be riding the crest, dip- 
ping and rolling from side to side, with 
an occasional wave breaking over the deck, 
washing it clean, and spray filling the air 
at all times. How little it made us feel! 
How absolutely helpless before the power 
of the elements, and how dependent we 
were upon the mercies of an all-wise, lov- 
ing Heavenly Father! For three days the 
storm raged unabated, and many of the 
passengers slept very little, fearing the 
worst. Even after the wind subsided the 
water was very rough and we were glad 
when in the morning light the shores of 
Japan were sighted. 

At Yokohama we were again allowed to 
go ashore, for which we were very glad, 



especially those who had been seasick. Here 
the sights were very new to us, and you 
may be sure we staid on terra firma as 
long as possible. As we passed through 
the streets, some of which were very nar- 
row and had no sidewalks, we saw heavily- 
loaded carts drawn by men; also many 
rickshaws, comparatively few horses or 
donkeys being used. Most of the shops 
had large, open fronts, where the wares, 
which in many instances had been manu- 
factured in the rear, were exhibited. Nearly 
all the buildings were one story in height 
and had several kinds of roofs — tile, thatch, 
and sheet iron being most commonly used. 
During our walk through one part of the 
city we came across an old temple on the 
hillside, which seemed to have been con- 
verted into a school; also a smaller one 
still used as a place to worship idols. 

Returning to the boat, we set sail the 
evening of the same day, and when we 
awoke the following morning the shores of 
Japan were still plainly visible, and were 
very picturesque, being covered with rug- 
ged mountains as far as the eye could see. 
After two days of sailing along these shores 
we touched at Nagasaki, another port, ar- 
riving in the evening about one hour after 
sunset. Here our boat was to stay only 
long enough to coal, leaving at five o'clock 
the following morning. This allowed the 
passengers ample time to go ashore and see 
a typical foreign city by night. However, 
the thing most interesting to me was the 
way they coal t)ie boats. Ten or more 
barges, loaded with coal, lined up along 
each side of our vessel, platforms were 
hung from the railing, the coolies formed 
a line and in a few moments baskets of coal 
were rapidly passing from one to another, 
the man at the end of the line dumping the 
coal into the hold of the ship and tossing 
the empty baskets back to be refilled. 
Shortly before morning this task was com- 
pleted, and at five o'clock our boat, guided 
by the local pilot, moved toward the outer 
harbor. For half an hour all went well, 
when suddenly the passengers were awak- 
ened by a bumping sensation and noise of 
the engines, which ran rapidly for a few 
seconds, then stopped entirely. Our boat 
was on a rock: Quickly the captain ordered 
the lifeboats lowered, but on discovering 



July 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



171 



there was no immediate danger, they were 
again hoisted in place, and every one not 
already up was awakened and told to dress. 
There were anxious moments for every 
one, but as daylight came on our fears were 
relieved when we saw that we were near 
the shore and knew the boat was uninjured, 
having simply slid up on to the rock. This 
happened at high tide, and as low tide came 
on the boat tilted far to the side, making 
it quite difficult to walk the decks. Many 
of the passengers remained on the ship that 
day and the following night, while others, 
feeling safer on land, staid at hotels in the 
city. The second night a severe storm 
arose, endangering the boat and the lives 
of those still on board, so orders were given 
that every one must go ashore and that the 
cargo must be removed. A large American 
transport loaded with United States soldiers 
happened to be in the harbor at the time, 
and very kindly staid by us, trying with 
might and main to pull us off the rock, but 
all to no avail. 

Finally all were safely ashore and lodging 
secured, the steamship company making 
arrangements as best it could for the com- 
pletion of the journey. Fortunately for 
us the overland route could be taken from 
now on very nicely, so we secured passage 
by rail through Japan, Korea, and Man- 
churia. The scenery in Japan was very 
pretty, the mountains being terraced and 
planted with vegetables and grains to their 
very tops. The lower lands were covered 
with rice fields and mulberry groves. 



Crossing the channel from Japan to 
Korea the sea was very rough and choppy, 
and nearly every One on board was more 
or less seasick, which gave occasion for 
rejoicing when we again set foot on land. 
In Korea the fields were cultivated in 
much the same manner as in Japan, being 
terraced, and irrigated with water drawn 
from wells, or deviated from mountain 
streams. The natives dress in white and 
wear peculiar small-crowned hats. They 
live in small villages nestled among the 
hills, each house and village being sur- 
rounded by a low stone wall. We saw no 
wagons — only two-wheeled carts, drawn by 
donkeys or cows, or often by both. 

Train accommodations were very mea- 
ger, only limited amounts of food being 
served at meals, and sleeping cars having 
very little heat. One night some of us slept 
on the wooden seats and some on the bag- 
gage shelves, being unable to secure any- 
thing better. However, as we neared Chi- 
nese soil it began to seem more homelike, 
especially for those who were returning 
to the land of their choice. Foreign trains 
do not run as fast as they do at home, but 
in due time we arrived in Peking, where 
we were escorted to the language students' 
home by husky rickshaw men. Our bag- 
gage arrived the following morning, and 
we, glad our journey was over, settled down 
to hard work on the language of the people 
we have come to serve. 

Language School, Peking, China. 



My First Year at Jalalpor 



Lillian Grisso 



THE first years of the missionary's 
life on the field are a time of absorp- 
tion and readjustment to new condi- 
tions. Not only is a new, strange language 
to be learned, but new people, new condi- 
tions and new methods of work must be 
studied. With all these new things to fill 
the days, time goes rapidly by. 

In January I came to Jalalpor to continue 
my language study. It has been a joy to 
find the conversation going on about me 
gradually becoming more intelligible, and 
to be able more and more to make myself 



understood. I completed the first year's 
work in March. After my examination I 
took a month's vacation from study. Part 
of this vacation was very pleasantly and 
profitably spent in visiting Bro. Ebey's and 
the work at Ahwa. our jungle station. May 
1 I began on the second year language 
course, and this has occupied the major part 
of the time since. 

The people look to the missionary for 
help in 60 many of the small details, and 
it has been a real joy to be able to give 



172 



The Missionary Visitor 



July 
1920 



some time to them in connection with my 
language study. It may be only the tying 
up of a child's cut finger, the giving of 
medicine for some common ailment, or 
showing a mother how to cut out some 
garment, but all these little things bring 
us in touch with people. 

Each morning prayer service has been 
held with those living on the compound, 
and during most of the year a Bible lesson 



has been given each week to my language 
teacher. 

The service has been imperfect, but the 
glory is the Heavenly Father's for anything 
that may have been accomplished. Thanks 
are due him for the splendid health I have 
had throughout the year and for the defi- 
nite help realized in work and study. May 
he give the strength to render better serv- 
ice among these needy ones in 1920. 



Vad; 



H. P. and Kathryn Garner 

Report for Year 1919 



(Editor's Note. — Lack of space prevented our 
printing this in the June Annual Report number.) 

CLANG! Clang! Clang! and the clock 
of time has struck the hour of twelve 
for nineteen hundred and nineteen. 
In, the twinkling of an eye we are ushered 
into another year. A year of opportunities 
has gone. Some have been seized, some 
passed by unnoticed, and some no doubt 
neglected. It has been a year filled with 
work and blessing. 

During the month of January we were 
away from the station for several weeks, 
visiting the other stations of our mission in 
order to get a better idea of the work and 
its methods before taking over the work 
left to us by Bro. Kaylor's going home on 
furlough. Soon after our return he turned 
things over to us and made his final prep- 
arations to leave for America. 

With these new and heavy responsibili- 
ties placed upon us, and being out of touch 
of the advice of senior missionaries, we 
realized much what it means to rely upon 
the Father in prayer. Village schools, 
boarding school, building work, church 
work and treasurer's work were the duties 
which fell to our lot. Having been only 
two years in the country, with no experience 
along any of the above lines of work except 
the last, it seemed like a big load to carry. 
However, we did what we could. What 
progress has been made we will not attempt 
to tell. We have tried to do our best. 

About two months of the hot season were 
spent at Mahableshwar in rest and house- 
keeping for those who were in language 
study. The mission statistician will give 
the statistical part of our work. 



Boys' Boarding School 

While our boys' school, which was started 
about a year and a half ago, is not all 
we would like it to be, we are glad to report 
progress. Our additions have not been 
many, only four in all. Of that number 
two were small boys, about four and six 
years of age, who, with their father, were 
found under a tree near our garden. It 
was during the famine months and they 
were in great need of food. The father, on 
being told that if he worked, food would 
be given him, became quite happy and 
agreed to do whatever he could. After 
being among our people some time, and 
feeling assured that we would do well by 
them, the boys were placed in the boarding 
school. Another one was a boy who came 
also because of famine conditions. The 
fourth is the son of a Christian widow who 
is in our employ. 

During the early part of the year an 
epidemic of sore eyes broke out in the 
school. As a result three boys went blind 
and later other diseases developed which 
caused the death of all of them. 

An encouraging feature in this phase of 
the work is the rapid development the 
boys make. Practically all are uncultured 
and mostly unclothed when they come to 
us. They have had no discipline and so 
they are diamonds in the rough. In a few 
months' time even the smallest can say 
Bible verses. On Sunday afternoon they 
have their Christian Workers' Society, in 
which the boys take full charge. The older 
ones acting as president and secretary, the 
rest take part with verses, and all except 



July 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



173 



the smallest take their turn in telling Bible 
stories. 

Village Schools 
The village school is by no means an 
unimportant part of a station's work. In- 
stead, it is one of the first steps in reaching 
the people. The hope of India lies in 
reaching the children. Train the present 
child and you will have a trained father or 
mother for the future generation. It is 
generally in the village school that the 
people get their first impressions of Chris- 
tianity. Consequently these schools should 
be the best possible. Because of the " flu," 
indifference on the part of the people, 
and carelessness on the part of the teach- 
ers, they have not progressed during the 
past year. In fact, they have fallen back 
in number ©f schools, in enrollment and 
in rank. For this we feel very sorry, but 
trust that now since we have secured a man 
who is to spend his time in pushing this 
work, we will be able to do better. Through 
this means we have gotten two into our 
boarding schools. Pray for us. 

Church and Evangelistic 
During the winter months it is the policy 
. of the mission to have its workers spend 
most of the time in special evangelistic 
effort. This is done by touring among the 
villages and telling the glad story wherever 
an opportunity can be found. 

One week during February was given to 
a special campaign. Then all the masters 
and Christians who could went out each 
day and evening. Through singing and tell- 
ing of the gospel story as many were 
reached as possible. Aside from this two 
men spend all their time in visiting among 
the people in this way. Although we 
have had no converts directly from this 
work, a social relationship and friendship 
has been developed in such a way that al- 
most without exception the people are glad 
when we come and invite us back when we 
leave. 

We are glad to say that the Vada church 
is growing in members and we hope in use- 
fulness. During the year there were several 
special services. Effort was put forth to 



get as many village people to attend as 
possible. The results were encouraging. 

Building Work 

Before Bro. Kaylor's leaving we had on 
foot the erection of a building for cook- 
room and storeroom for the boys' boarding 
school. This work we were required to 
take over and carry on to completion, in 
spite of the fact that we had had little or 
no experience in building. At the close of 
the rains we began to repair the bungalow. 
The ceiling was changed to remove a rat 
harbor, and in order to give greater protec- 
tion from the sun the walls were raised 
and an upstairs sleeping veranda built over 
the dining room and west veranda. In 
this way we hope to be able to accommo- 
date another family. 

Treasurer's Work 

The present unrest in exchange has in- 
creased not only the duties but also the 
responsibility of the mission treasurer many 
times. The former method of selling the 
home treasurer's drafts when received was 
not difficult, except in one or two cases. 
But in order to secure better exchange we 
have adopted the method of the India 
treasurer, drawing demand drafts on the 
home Board. It is not easy to know just 
when to draw these drafts in order to get 
the best exchange. However, we owe much 
to the secretary of the Bombay Tract and 
Book Society, who has been helping us 
out in this matter, thereby overcoming 
some of the disadvantages we have been 
to in living thirty miles from the railway, 
which made it inconvenient to reach Bom- 
bay as often as necessary to attend to this 
work. The exchange has been very bad. 
Before the war the rate was three rupees 
and four annas for one dollar. Now it is 
from two rupees one anna to two rupees 
five annas for one dollar. This makes a 
big loss. We, indeed, are very grateful 
to the the home Board for making up the 
deficit incurred by poor exchange, which 
amount was equivalent to nearly one-third 
of the budget. 

Vada, Thana Dist, India. 



174 



The Missionary Visitor 



July 
1920 



A Retrospect 

Nettie M. Senger 



SOMETHING almost tragic . happened 
a year ago, and since then I have done 
no mission work — have only stood by 
and looked on as others continued. It has. 
been hard to have no part in that which 
I so love--in fact, the hardest thing I have 
done since I came to the mission field. And 
yet the year has been a very profitable 
one and full of blessings, just because I 
did stop and look on, and think some as 
one can not think when at the front. It 
is like when you step back from the base 
of a mountain and view it from a distance, 
so it can be seen in its connection with the 
other mountains adjacent. You are en- 
abled to see it in its true perspective, as 
you can not while ascending its rugged 
sides. As you ascend you feel it must 
surely be the highest and steepest moun- 
tain in the vicinity, when in reality others 
beside it tower much higher, with harder 
climbing. So it is with mission work and 
one's own small part in the mission. 

A missionary, just returned, was heard 
to make the remark: "The mission and its 
workings surely look different at long 
range." The work also looks different when 
one is on the ground, seeing and knowing 
the daily routine as it is progressing; and 
yet not active, and making no decisions as 
the problems come up. Such a view is 
very helpful, and in the past year I have 
been greatly blest by having this privilege. 
My illness, though rather grave, prevent- 
ing me from doing anything at all, caused 
very little suffering, and I have for the 
most part been able to take in the situation 
as the work continued. 

To bring Christ to this people and make 
them leaders, so they can handle all the 
affairs of the country in a wise way while 
the foreigner steps back and out, is the 
problem of the missionary. It is compara- 
tively easy to direct and have the natives 
just obey our orders; for all these many 
centuries they have been taught to follow 
and not lead out; but the problem is how 
to make them think the thing through 



themselves. However, they are growing 
some. The very bigness of the task makes 
us rejoice. They have so many social, eco- 
nomic and financial reforms to work out, be- 
sides the religious, bringing them to know 
the God who loves and can save them. It 
calls for all the leadership in us; it calls 
for all the love of Christ and patience a 
hundredfold, backed by the wonderful 
power of God to conquer. But it can and 
must be done. Other missionary bodies 
are here for their share of the work, and 
the Chinese themselves are coming to the 
front. They are awake and working, and 
with all the brave advances being made, if 
we pull together, steadily and evenly, we 
will succeed. 

Things no longer go slow in China. An 
auto road is being talked of from the 
capital of Shansi to Liao. It is being pushed 
by the Chinese. Wireless telegraphy and 
telephony are being introduced. Messages 
can travel fast; people can travel fast. The 
burden that presses me now is, '* Is the 
message of Christ traveling rapidly 
enough?" and "Is it rooting deep enough 
into the hearts of the people and making 
them over after the pattern of Christ?" 

The work is moving on. Growth can be 
seen in our little mission in the last year. 
More people are knowing Christ and more 
who had accepted him are growing in the 
Christ-life. People in villages isolated 
from the late movements are more preju- 
diced. Success is ours; we can not fail for 
Christ is here. And about it all there is 
no uncertain sound. The power belongs to 
us to conquer. Christ says, "All things 
whatsoever ye ask I will give it," and 
" Freely ye have received, freely give." 
We read also in the Bible, " There is no 
other name under heaven whereby men 
must be saved." Let us think on these 
things till they become a part of us; then 
go in the power of God to accomplish 
them. 

Ping Ting Hsien, Shansi, China. 



July 

1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



175 



Our First Week's Experiences in Language 

School 



Sara Zigler Myers 



ON the morning of Oct. 1, 1919, we 
were up with a hustle and a bustle, 
as it was the opening day of the 
North China Union Language School in 
Peking. At 8: 45 we found ourselves seated 
in the general classroom, awaiting our in- 
itiation, the nature of which we had not 
been told. Soon Mr. W. B. Pettus, the 
director of the school, appeared and* said 
that Mr. Chin, the head Chinese teacher, 
would use the first period in giving us our 
introduction to the Chinese language, and 
that when he stepped before us we should 
arise and bow to him. He told us that this 
was a custom to be observed with each of 
our teachers, every day, both when they 
appeared before us, and when they left at 
the end of the hour. 

Mr. Chin appeared. He bowed most 
gracefully, while we stiff foreigners made 
our first attempt at the same stunt. Then 
we sat down and listened for his first 
words. They were " Wo," " ni," and " t'a," 
with their proper tones, which in English 
mean "I," "you," and "he." After re- 
peating them a number of times, with the 
aid of gestures, he gave a few other words 
in addition, saying them over and over until 
the period was up. 

For the remainder of that day, and the 
two following, we listened to different 
teachers go over those same words. Of 
course we were divided up into smaller 
groups and scattered around through the 
buildings, and each day a few other words 
were added, but the first period of each day 
was and is always used by the head teacher 
when we all assemble for the new words 
and their ways of being used. 

So it went for the first three days. We 
were not allowed to say any of the words 
ourselves, nor to write them down. It was 
our sole business to listen and listen, in 
order to get the proper tones, and to allow 
the words to soak into our mental quarters 
as best they would. After the first three 
days, however, we were divided up into 
still smaller sections, about eight or ten 
pupils in a class, and were assigned also 



private, individual teachers to whom we 
were to go at least two periods a day. 
Then we began being asked to pronounce 
words, and to say short sentences; also 
to ask and answer simple questions. We 
were never allowed to use any English at 
all, even though we soon learned that a 
few of our teachers knew a little them- 
selves. • 

This will give you a brief idea of our 
introduction into language study, and it 
continues much the same as it was begun. 
From 8:45 A. M. until 4 P. M., except for 
two hours at noon, and for special periods 
each week when Mr. Pettus provides us 
with fine lectures given by noted English- 
speaking people, we listen to our long- 
gowned, and, for the most part, very ex- 
cellent Chinese teachers. It is not easy — 
no, not at all — but it is quite fascinating. 
Each day brings us new words and new 
meanings to dig out. Some are hard and 
again some are rather easy, but the right 
order, and the use of proper tones, of which 
there are four (and each word has its spe- 
cial one, the wrong use of which usually por- 
trays an entirely different meaning), is very 
hard. 

Yes, it is fascinating; we enjoy it immense- 
ly. But it is strenuous and very tiresome, 
even though we do not do much studying 
at home. One must concentrate each mo- 
ment if he would understand and be able to 
answer correctly, and it requires a great 
deal of nerve energy. Sometimes we almost 
become discouraged, but again, when we 
occasionally find ourselves able to get our 
meanings across to our friends and 
teachers, when we hear of those who had 
extreme difficulty in getting the language 
and now are masters of it, and when we 
think of the importance of obtaining at 
least a reasonable knowledge of it, if we 
would accomplish the work which we came 
to do among these excellent people, we 
gladly and joyously determine anew to 
push ahead and do our very best. 

North China Union Language School, 
Peking, Feb. 23 ; 



176 



The Missionary Visitor 



July 

1920 



Side Lines to Language Study 



M. M. Myers 



THE North China Union Language 
School is regarded by missionary 
societies as a missionary training 
school, and often it is called such. They 
use the proper term, I think, because mere 
language study is far from being the only 
big advantage provided by the school. 
However, in this report I desire only to 
mention one phase of the opportunities 
offered while here in school, and that is 
the work among the Chinese students, but 
some other time a more comprehensive 
presentation may be given. 

As Peking is the capital, the seat of the 
central government, and the metropolis of 
North China, many students attend the 
large Government University and other 
colleges and schools in the city. The 
churches working here, as they faced this 
tremendous opportunity, divided the city 
and schools among them, making some par- 
ticular denomination responsible for every 
school and section of the city. Each large 
church has put a competent man in charge 
of the student branch of its work. In 
some of the schools, the Y. M. C. A. and 
Y. W. C. A., teachers also are needed for 
classes in English. Last fall there were 
calls for more voluntary helpers than could 
be supplied. By means of cooperation 
many workers are furnished from the Lan- 
guage School. The particular value to a 
person studying the language is that it 
helps to keep his spiritual fires burning, 
and at the same time gives him an oppor- 
tunity to study the Chinese people by direct 
personal contact and to form priceless 
friendships. In this there should be a three- 
fold benefit — to the church, to the students 
and to the teacher. 

It has been my happy privilege to teach a 



Bible class of brilliant young men from the 
Government University each Saturday 
night. And an interesting fact to me is 
that several of the group are Shansi boys, 
their home being in the same province in 
which I am expecting to live and work. 
They can use English fairly well and are 
eager to learn more about it. I should 
say that many of the students enter; these 
Bible classes in order to improve in Eng- 
lish conversation, for they hope to go to 
America or Europe some day. 

For several weeks after Christmas their 
attendance was irregular, because the Stu- 
dent Movement, a movement that is prov- 
ing to be a powerful factor in China, has 
had a program of demonstration of some 
kind on Saturday afternoons and nights. 
One week quite a few of the students were 
imprisoned because the officials were not 
in favor with some things they did. I hope 
that through your American papers* you 
have learned about this movement. Space 
forbids discussion here. 

The hope for China lies in her students, 
for they are facing their country's prob- 
lems, studying her needs, and are endeavor- 
ing through organized, patriotic efforts, to 
create and stimulate a loyal, intelligent 
citizenship among the masses. The op- 
portunity for the Christian church, through 
her Christian students and leaders, is to 
help the people to see and feel the need of 
Christianity and her just principles in the 
program for a greater and better China. 
May sufficient grace, unbounding love, and 
heavenly wisdom be granted the leadership 
of forces for good in these critical days 
of this great country. 

North China Union Language School, 
Peking, Feb. 23, 1920. 



Getting Ready for the Conflict 



O. C. and Hazel Sollenberger 



WE are not yet in the fight, but we 
are putting on the armor. As the 
months come and go we hope to 
put on piece by piece, that soon we may be 



able to enter the conflict for righteousnes 
and help save a few of China's millions. 

One of the prerequisties to doing effec- 
tive work among these people is to learn 



July 
1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



177 



their language, and at this difficult task we 
are digging away in the line of one of 
China's proverbs: "Don't be afraid of go- 
ing slow, but be afraid of standing still! " 

Equally important with acquiring the 
language is obtaining a knowledge of these 
people — their history, their present condi- 
tion and their outlook. Being permitted 
to attend the language school in the capi- 
tal city of China, we have many opportuni- 
ties for preparation that private study else- 
where would not afford. Here we frequently 
have the privilege of listening to lectures 
on China and the great church and world 
movements, given by men who have spent 
years on the field and are giving their, best 
efforts to support these noble causes. 

Aside from the lectures which we hear, 
we also have the privilege of seeing with 
our eyes many temples and other wonder- 
ful pieces of art and architecture, which 
speak louder than words of China's won- 
derful past. But the once magnificent tem- 
ples, where China's millions have worshiped, 
are beginning to crumble, and very lit- 
tle effort is being made to repair them. 
This, together with the, efforts that are 
being made to care for the widows, or- 
phans and poor, although very meager at 
present, reveals a bit of the influence that 
Christianity is exerting. 



Last but not least in our preparation is 
the adjusting of ourselves to new condi- 
tions. The physical, mental and spiritual 
all come into play here. Changing from 
one country and people to another, we find 
the climate, people and customs, all differ- 
ent. Many vexing problems arise day after 
day, and sometimes we think it takes more 
effort to keep close to our Master than it 
did in the homeland. Furthermore, it is 
absolutely necessary that we keep our 
physical bodies in good trim in order to 
learn the language and be able to use the 
armor when we get it on. Here many 
things enter in, such as not worrying, get- 
ting the necessary exercise, plenty of sleep 
and being careful of the food we eat and 
the water we drink. Just at the beginning 
of our study at the school last fall our 
six-year-old daughter fell a victim of dysen- 
tery, which is a very prevalent disease of 
the orient, frequently taking our little ones 
from us. How thankful we were for hos- 
pital advantages, good medical care, and 
the resigned hearts which God gave us! 
Then, when it seemed to us" from the hu- 
man standpoint she could not live, her little 
life was given a new lease. Now she is 
well and happy again and enjoying her 
school work. 



Twenty-One Months in India 



Anetta C. Mow 



ALMOST two years have passed since 
I landed in Bombay. As I look back 
over these months I have to wonder 
what I have done worth reporting. It has 
been a period of readjustment and a time 
for study, but owing to ill health, I have 
not been able to study more than eight 
months. However, I hope the other thir- 
teen months have not been wholly lost, 
for I have been learning about India, her 
peoples, her customs and her beliefs. It 
is my prayer that this time of quiet waiting 
has been a time of making observations 
which will prove helpful when I am able to 
enter the work. I rejoice that I am able to 
study again. 

During the first half of November I was 
given the privilege of attending the W. C. 
T. U. National Convention at Lucknow. 



There 1 met missionary women from all 
over India. I learned to know the serious- 
ness of the liquor question in India. It 
is time that every missionary and Indian 
Christian awakes to the fact that the 
drink habit is fastening itself on this land 
with alarming rapidity, and then rises 
against if. 

I also saw some of the work of several 
missions while on this trip. I visited two 
girls' schools. One morning while in Luck- 
now I ate breakfast in the Isabella Tho- 
burn College dining-hall. 

The trip itself was worth much to me 
from an educational and historical stand- 
point. On the way home I stopped at 
Agra to see the world-famous Taj Mahal. 

Just before Christmas I moved to Vyara. 
I hope soon to be ready for work. 



178 



The Missionary Visitor 



July 

1920 



China Notes for March 



Anna Hutchison 



WE are glad to report that Bro. 
Bright has sufficiently recovered 
from his recent severe illness to 
be about his work again. 

Not least among the happenings in the 
China Mission during the past month was 
the arrival of Master Daniel Harold Bow- 
man March 21. 

The schools of our various stations and 
out-stations, which were closed, for a few 
weeks' holiday at the Chinese New Year 
season, were opened again the second week 
of this month, with renewed interest and 
added numbers. The new impulse given 
to education throughout this province is 
being manifested in both young and old — in 
parents taking a new interest in having 
children educated, and in children them- 
selves desiring to go to school. 



March 15 we opened a two months' ses- 
sion school for the women at Liao Chou. 
This is especially to give religious instruc- 
tion and to teach the women the new pho- 
netic system of reading and writing; a system 
that can be learned even by these illiterate 
women in a month or so of time. We have 
now twenty-two women enrolled, who come 
practically every day. This is the writer's 
first attempt at work of this nature among 
the women, but the vim and interest With 
which the women are taking up the work 
is most gratifying and even touching when 
one sees how desirous they are to learn 
when once the opportunity is given them. 
And best of all, they are eager to go to 
church, and gather each Sunday that we 
may go as a school together. These, to- 
gether with our increased numbers in our 
schools, have filled our chapel to over- 
flowing till we feel like pushing out the 
walls or else " tearing down and building 
greater." 



At Shou Yang the boys' school now. num- 
bers thirty-five and the girls' school twenty- 
nine, and pupils are being sent away for 
lack of room. The chapel is being turned 
into a schoolroom during the week for the 
girls, and on Sunday desks are removed to 
give place for the long benches to seat the 
audience. A churchhouse will be a most 
welcome equipment to the work at that sta- 
tion. 

Since the reopening of the schools at 
Liao Chou the boys' school has increased 
in number until now we have over a hun- 
dred and thirty. The new school-building 
is not large enough to accommodate all of 
them, and some are being lodged in an ad- 
joining temple. The girls' school also has 
grown to nearly forty girls, who are most 
comfortably located in the new Sweitzer 
Memorial Building, and who speak with 
touching appreciation of the gift of their 
splendid home and the sacrifice that made it 
possible. What a new life and freedom of 
girlhood, too, they are experiencing on 
their ample and well-equipped playgrounds! 



Even in these days of greater progress 
and favor, it is not, however, without dif- 
ficulty and opposition that we must some- 
times push forward the work. A few days 
ago a letter came to us from He Shun, one 
of our out-stations, signed by the member- 
ship there, asking the foreigners to come 
without delay to their assistance, as the 
official of the place had shut up the fathers 
and brothers of several of our pupils and 
had threatened others. After prayer and 
consultation together we decided to send 
Bro. Seese and our head teacher to see what 
could be done to adjust matters. Later 
Sister Cripe went, and at this writing is 
still there. We are earnestly praying* that 
all may yet work out to our Father's glory. 

J* 
Recently two of our Christian women at 
Ping Ting went out in a village to live for 
two weeks, preaching the Gospel in every 
home in that and four other near-by vil- 
lages. In all they visited about 250 homes 
and preached to about two thousand people. 
In only one instance did they receive any 
persecution, but many tried to test their 



July 

1920 



The Missionary Visitor 



179 



knowledge of their message in various 
ways. 

Bro. Crumpacker and four of his helpers 
have been conducting an aggressive itiner- 
ary campaign this month in the Ping Ting 
district. About forty-three villages were 
visited and about five thousand people heard 
the message of the Gospel from their lips. 
The people received them gladly and we 
hope for much fruit from the seed-sowing 
that has been done. 

Bro. Yin, pastor at our Ping Ting Sta- 
tion, and his older brother, who has been 
buyer for some years at the Liao Station, 
were absent in the early part of this month 
because of the severe illness of their moth- 
er. She passed away shortly after their 
return to us. We extend to them our heart- 
felt sympathy. 

J* 

The evangelistic department at Shou 
Yang engaged a valuable helper in the per- 
son of Mr. Wu, of Te Chou, who has had 
a thorough theological as well as college 
training. He is taking up his work with 
a zeal and earnestness that speak well for 
a successful worker. He is a member of the 
Congregational Church. 

& 

At the above station the calls are still 
coming in for medical aid, and in many 
cases the workers feel helpless to meet the 
need. March 11 one c_ r our nurses, Edna 
Flory, arrived at the station, and had scarce- 
ly gotten settled when a call came from the 
village of Sung I, five miles out, for some 
one to come and look after some men who 
had been burned in a powder explosion. 
She and Mr. Heisey heeded the call, climbed 
into an oxcart, and in four and a half hours 
arrived at the place of the terrible disaster. 
Six men had been burned to the point of 
unconsciousness. They commenced the 
work of bandaging, which kept up without 
any rest until 4 P. M. Just what was ac- 
complished physically may not be known, 
but grateful appreciation was manifested 
for the effort made, and we may hope this 
vision of the Christ spirit may yet bear 
fruit to his glory. 



The work in the hospital at Ping Ting 
has become heavy since Dr. Wampler's re- 
turn to the field. About thirty in-patients 
are now being cared for, and the daily dis- 
pensary hour is a busy time for the doctor. 

During the latter part of the month there 
was a slight rainfall in the vicinity of Liao, 
the first since last fall, about five months 
ago. 

J* 

China Notes for April 

ONE of the most important happenings 
within the China Mission during the 
past month was the arrival of Master 
Wendell Phillips, on April 24, to gladden 
the home of Brother and Sister Byron 
Flory, who are located at Shou Yang, our 
new station. 

J* 

Dr. Brubaker's two weeks' sojourn with 
the workers at Shou Yang this month was 
much appreciated. During this time he 
was kept busy administering to the needs 
of the " lame, halt and blind." Shou Yang 
is a splendid location for a summer resort, 
but it is not a good place for a doctor to 
rest. Surely the need for medical work 
there is great! 

Even at a far inland station as Liao Chou, 
where one is inclined to feel he is cut off 
from the outside world, not many months 
pass without bringing changes to the work 
and workers. Only a few months ago some 
of our workers returned from furlough; 
others returned, but were located elsewhere. 
As this month draws to a close Dr. Bru- 
baker's are busy making final arrangements 
for leaving and in another week will have 
started on their furlough. Still a few 
months more and Brother Flory's will be 
going. Meanwhile Dr. Homing's come to 
Liao for the summer and possibly others of 
the new work